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Sandy on December 19th, 2014

The following useful information published on Ancestry.com’s blog has the potential to help you research and view your ancestry in a whole new light: We’ve launched our latest free research guide for the great state of Montana. Here are five things you might not know about Montana.  When settlers began arriving in Montana in earnest […]

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Sandy on December 17th, 2014

Starting on the 25th of the Jewish month of Kislev, Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights. This year Hanukkah began at sundown yesterday, December 16, 2014.  A miracle happened  in 168 B.C.E. when the Jewish Temple was seized by Syrian-Greek soldiers and dedicated to the worship of the god Zeus. Many of […]

Continue reading about The miracle of the oil—Happy Hanukkah!

Continuing my previous post about the precarious situation brought about by human predators. Brought to us by CNN news the Northern white rhino is teetering on the brink of extinction with only five left worldwide.

Continue reading about Northern white rhino dies at San Diego zoo; only 5 left worldwide

I’ve been a fan of James Rollins amazing Six Sigma novels for several years and I think his latest, The Sixth Extinction (Sigma Force), is the best to date—at least until his next book is published. At the start of each book Rollins publishes informational nuggets of truth vs. fiction to get the juices flowing.  In […]

Continue reading about James Rollins novel “The Sixth Extinction” cleverly relays an important warning to everyone

I’ve traveled around the world about three times during my life. Many years have passed since those days, but it’s safe to say I’ve journeyed extensively in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, the South Pacific, Australia and Central America and more. I’ve always found regular folks to be friendly and kind to people visiting their […]

Continue reading about Christmas Truce December 24–25, 1914: WWI enemies swap gifts and sing carols together

Sandy on December 8th, 2014

On December 8, 1980, John Lennon’s (former member the The Beatles) peaceful domestic life on New York‘s Upper West Side with his wife Yoko Ono and their son Sean was shattered by 25-year-old Mark David Chapman. Psychiatrists diagnosed Chapman as a borderline psychotic. He was instructed to plead insanity, but instead he pleaded guilty to […]

Continue reading about Remembering John Lennon murdered Dec 8, 1980.

Today is Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. At 7:55 a.m. Hawaii time, a Japanese dive bomber bearing the red symbol of the Rising Sun of Japan on its wings appears out of the clouds above the island of Oahu. A swarm of 360 Japanese warplanes followed, descending on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in […]

Continue reading about Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day: Pearl Harbor bombed Dec 7, 1941

So, what else is new?  We’ve been hearing about royal scandals for a long time now but this one could have an interesting outcome. DNA tests have confirmed that the ancient bones found under a car park in Leicester are those of Richard III – but they also point to a sex scandal in his family […]

Continue reading about Genetic analysis raises questions about legitimacy of Henry VIII and other English royals

The following news release comes from the National Genealogical Society(NGS): “Registration is now open for the National Genealogical Society’s thirty-seventh annual family history conference, Crossroads of America, which will be held 13–16 May 2015 at the St. Charles Convention Center in St. Charles, Missouri. Conference highlights include a choice of more than 150 lectures, given by nationally known speakers and subject matter […]

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WorldCat is the world’s largest network of library content and services. It is an online library catalog that lets you look up items in libraries around the world and perfect for family historians, genealogists and everyone else. The items available include books, electronic documents, journals, microform, and audio and video recordings. Best of all its […]

Continue reading about WorldCat the largest network of library content in the world and it’s free.

Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, the British leader who guided Great Britain and the Allies through the crisis of World War II, was born at Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, England, on November 30, 1864, one hundred and fifty years ago. Churchill came from a family with a long history of military service and joined the British […]

Continue reading about Winston Churchill was one of the most inspiring leaders of the twentieth century

Sandy on November 26th, 2014

By 1916, United States citizens were referring to Thanksgiving Day as Turkey Day, but that wasn’t always the case. In fact, the Pilgrims might not have eaten turkey at all. According to historians, the Pilgrims ate wildfowl, corn, and venison.  Turkey first claimed its place as the Thanksgiving bird in the 1700s when Founding Father […]

Continue reading about The history of Thanksgiving

Sandy on November 23rd, 2014

The story behind one of the world’s most epic survival stories is to be displayed in an archive at the National Library of Scotland. If the account was written as fiction many folks would find it hard to believe. The epic tale of the crew’s survival is real and has become the stuff of polar […]

Continue reading about The greatest survival story of all time

The archive of an Indiana Jones-like Scottish adventurer is to be made available to the public by the National Library of Scotland for the first time. Papers belonging to Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor (11 February 1915 – 10 June 2011) will appear on the website of the National Library of Scotland. Fermor, also known […]

Continue reading about Scottish adventurer’s archive now online at the National Library of Scotland

An interesting study from Ancestry.com shows that online family history research has increased 14 times in the past 10 years. See below: “Multi-Country Study by Ancestry.com Examines Changing Family Structures to Show Closer Bonds Between Children and Grandparents; Longevity and Birthrates Lead to Increase in Vertical Families PROVO, UT–(Marketwired – November 19, 2014) – Over the past […]

Continue reading about Online family history research in United States increased 14 times in past decade

Sandy on November 20th, 2014

The latest news on DNA matching improvements is as follows: “We’re excited to tell you about some major improvements we’ve made to help you find your possible relatives with AncestryDNA. AncestryDNA scientists have innovated new and better ways to identify family relationships by comparing DNA between AncestryDNA members. Now, AncestryDNA is almost 70x more likely […]

Continue reading about Ancestry’s DNA matching just got better

Twitter has started to let users search through every tweet publicly sent from the globally-popular one-to-many messaging service since it launched in 2006. The company has built a searchable index of billions tweets posted using the service known for its real-time torrent of messages. Twitter said, “Since that first simple tweet over eight years ago, […]

Continue reading about Twitter has built a searchable index of the billions of tweets posted since 2006

“FamilySearch adds more than 3.7 million indexed records and images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,395,009 images from the Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993 collection; the 396,405 images and 396,405 indexed records from the US, BillionGraves Index collection; and the 389,387 indexed […]

Continue reading about FamilySearch Adds More Than 3.7 Million Indexed Records and Images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, and the United States

The National Genealogy Society (NGS) has released the following information on its full conference program on the 2015 conference in St. Charles Missouri from 13-16 May, titled Crossroads of America: “ARLINGTON, VA, 12 November 2014: The National Genealogical Society (NGS) is pleased to announce the 2015 Family History Conference program is now available in a sixteen-page […]

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Sandy on November 10th, 2014

History is full of dramatic tales that are well known and oft repeated. Some of the incidents might not be what we think, such as Joan of Arc, or Jack the Ripper. History Extra gives us some insight into what we get wrong. See below: “1) A lost Romanov princess When Tsar Nicholas II and […]

Continue reading about Ten historical mysteries we get wrong

This is most definitely hot off the press. Listen carefully: Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

Continue reading about Hot of the press: Russian hackers penetrate US power grid

On November 7, 1980 (34 years ago), the world lost actor Steve McQueen, one of Hollywood’s leading men of the 1960s and 1970s. The star of star action thrillers, such as,, Bullitt and the Towering Inferno died at age 50 in Mexico where where he was undergoing an experimental treatment for cancer. In 1979, McQueen […]

Continue reading about Anniversary of the death of the “King of Cool” Steve McQueen November 7, 1980

Sandy on November 6th, 2014

What has been described by a Forbes article as a pernicious piece of Apple  focused malware succeeded in raising awareness this week.  It may have infected as many as 356,000 users in China. The malicious malware is called WireLurker. Although all are based in China, where the malicious WireLurker code was hidden inside 467 OS X […]

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The latest from Ancestry.com is a very interesting collection of Native American records. See below and note the number of records marked FREE: “If your American ancestors make the settlers at St. Augustine and Jamestown look like a bunch of Johnny-come-latelies, we have good news. We just added 11 new databases to our American Indian collections, […]

Continue reading about Inside Scoop from Ancestry: The American Indian Collection

Although it’s only the beginning of November, it’s already off with Halloween and Thanksgiving (sadly for some) and on with Christmas and Hanukkah.  Retailers have had Christmas items on display since the back-to-school stuff went on clearance. Does your family historian love to read? It was great to discover that there’s genealogical fiction in the world of mystery writing. […]

Continue reading about Holiday gift idea for family historians and mystery buffs

Sandy on October 31st, 2014

The Celts, those interesting and mysterious folks who lived about 2000 years ago in what is known today as the United Kingdom and Ireland, celebrated New Year on November 1st. They believed that on the night before New Year the boundary between the worlds of the living and the world of the dead became blurred. […]

Continue reading about Happy Halloween: It’s not a tall tale it’s real

I’ve just received the following details from Family Tree DNA. If you have tests on Ancestry.com or 23andMe it’s worth investigating: “Family Tree DNA is now allowing people that have taken an AncestryDNA™ or 23andMe© (V3) test to transfer their raw data to the Family Finder database for FREE by visiting www.familytreedna.com/AutosomalTransfer! That’s right!  Pass […]

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Sandy on October 26th, 2014

If you love Jane Austin’s books and Mr Darcy here’s another great find from the BBC’s History Extra: Whether it’s breakfast at Northanger Abbey, tea and cake at Mansfield Park, or one of Mrs Bennet’s dinners to impress, food is an important theme in Jane Austen’s novels. And now, Austen fans can recreate the dishes […]

Continue reading about Top 5 Jane Austen recipes

Sandy on October 24th, 2014

These slices of history arrived via the BBC History Extra magazine: “With one a day said to keep the doctor at bay, apples are today one of the nation’s most popular fruits. But the lunchbox staple also has a curious history – here, on National Apple Day, food historian Joanna Crosby reveals 9 things you probably […]

Continue reading about 9 strange facts about the history of apples

A recent news release from Ancestry.com revealed some very interesting and unexpected statics between occupation and home ownership since 1900: “PROVO, Utah, October 15, 2014 – Members of the armed services are among the least likely to own a home in the United States, according to a new analysis by Ancestry, the world’s largest online family history […]

Continue reading about New analysis from Ancestry reveals surprising connections between occupation and home ownership since 1900

Sandy on October 22nd, 2014

This month we acknowledge our National Archives and Archivist of the United States (AOTUS) David Ferriero enthusiastically celebrated the month long occasion by visiting his old high school in Beverly, Massachusetts. What Mr. Ferriero does to encourage students to become acquainted and interested our national treasures is wonderful.  A couple of days ago he described the experience at Beverly […]

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Apple has announced that customers can start making payments with the touch of a finger as of today October 20, when Apple Pay becomes available in the U.S. to Iphone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus,as well as the IPad  iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3 users in stores will be able to use Touch […]

Continue reading about As of today, October 20, 2014, Apple Pay is set to transform mobile payments

Sandy on October 20th, 2014

The notorious Red Scare kicked into high gear in Washington on October 20, 1947 (67 years ago), as a Congressional committee began investigating Communist influence in one of the world’s richest and most glamorous communities: Hollywood. Has the situation flipped?  Our Government is now actively using the entertainment industry to promote their agenda for different reasons using […]

Continue reading about Congress investigates “Reds” in Hollywood

Sandy on October 17th, 2014

Apple has just unveiled the iPad Air2. As far as I can see Apple Says New iPad Is 18% Thinner; iMac Includes Sharper Resolution Apple’s new iPad Air will give old iPads a body image problem. Apple reports that the new iPad is a fashionable 18% thinner and includes a sharper resolution. The thickness of […]

Continue reading about Apple unveils iPad Air 2, iMac

I hope you managed to take a look at yesterday’s entry about the Family Search library. Today, I’d like to pass along the latest addition of more than 9.2 million records to the FamilySearch.org database. On October 7th more than 2.8 million indexed records and images were added to Belgium, Canada, Columbia, Ghana, Spain and the […]

Continue reading about FamilySearch Adds More Than 9.2 Million Indexed Records and Images to Belgium, India, Slovakia, and the United States

Sandy on October 15th, 2014

The publication Standard Examiner has an interesting article declaring to readers, among other interesting information, that genealogy is the second largest hobby in the world. This is amazing considering how many hobbies are out there. The Ogden Family Search Library houses  the second largest family history library in the United States and maybe the world. The […]

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Sandy on October 14th, 2014

The Hawaii state archives are going digital. Soon, from the comfort of your home you can check records that include your genealogy and marriage licenses. Take a look at the video below:

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Sandy on October 13th, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving Canada! In Canada, Thanksgiving Day is celebrated on the second Monday of October to celebrate the harvest and other blessings of the past year. It’s a statutory holiday in most areas of Canada with the optional exceptions of Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, Labrador, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. Companies regulated by the Canadian […]

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The National Library of Scotland (NLS) has come up with a wonderful way to teach elementary school children the lowland Scots language. See below: “Jings, crivvens … Oor Wullie’s teachin’ the bairns Oor Wullie — one of Scotland’s most famous characters — is helping children to learn Scots in an online educational initiative developed by […]

Continue reading about Scottish cartoon character Oor Wullie (Our William) teaches children the Scots language

The following is the latest update informs of the growing collection of Oregon newspapers from newspapers.com: “This month we’re highlighting our growing collection of papers from Oregon. Although this state’s collection is already at over 500,000 pages across 24 newspapers,Newspapers.com is planning on adding thousands more pages in the near future through our partnership with the […]

Continue reading about Newspapers.com content update: Historical newspaper the Oregonian and the Oregon Statesesman added resources

Sandy on October 10th, 2014

The following announcement comes from the Irish Family History Foundation: “The Irish Family History Foundation is pleased to announce that the rootsireland.ie website has become a Subscription based service, giving users access to search an index of over 20 million Irish records and to view the details of the records. (Subject to our terms and […]

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According to reports Icelanders are “the world champions of human genetics”.  A commercial for a phone company even depicted a couple waking up after a one-night-stand showing a scene where they both pick up their smart phones and log into a family-tree website to check their genealogy. So, why would they do this? There are only 320,000 […]

Continue reading about How Iceland’s obsession with genealogy has led to amazing scientific breakthroughs

To register for the free webinar click on http://www.archives.gov/education/history-day/workshops.html

Continue reading about Free Webinar today, October 7, 2014, with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

FamilySearch adds more than 183 million indexed records and images to Belgium, China, Czech Republic, England and Wales, Finland, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Korea, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 66,586,112 indexed records from the England and Wales, Birth Registration Index, 1837–2008, collection; the 6,142,790 images from the US, Missouri, Probate […]

Continue reading about FamilySearch adds more than 183 Million indexed records and images to Belgium, China, Czech Republic, England and Wales, Finland, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Korea, Ukraine, and the United States

Sandy on October 5th, 2014

What are the Devil’s Footprints? What happened to the Mary Celeste? Did Richard III murder the princes in the Tower? Is the Shroud of Turin the burial cloth of Jesus of Nazareth? These are some of the biggest historical mysteries of all time. Listed below are nine of those unsolved mysteries investigated by Dr David Clarke, who […]

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Sandy on October 3rd, 2014

Today at sundown, is the beginning of the Day of Atonement, also known as Yom Kippur (יוֹם כִּפּוּר or יום הכיפורים.) It’s the holiest and most solemn day of the year for the Jews. The most heard greeting for the Jewish New Year season is “May your name be inscribed in the Book of Life”. […]

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In science fiction, invisibility capes can make kids invisible, but up until now, scientists have only been able to hide certain wavelengths of light, which have part of the visible spectrum (The visible spectrum is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye, none of us can see. Now researchers at the […]

Continue reading about The invisibility cloak you’ve been longing to own is almost here

The following information about the new free genealogy site FamilyTreeNow.com comes with a thank you to Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter: “A new genealogy site has appeared within the past few days at FamilyTreeNow.com. It is billed as being completely free for everything. The site is in beta and claims to have “billions of historical records, including census (1790-1940) […]

Continue reading about Introducing a new free genealogy site: FamilyTreeNow.com

The latest news from Findmypast is as follows: “Today we’re delighted to announce that we’ve published  four million parish records in partnership with the Yorkshire Digitisation Consortium. We’ve worked with six Yorkshire archives to make these records available online for the very first time. This collection comprises beautiful scanned images of the original handwritten registers […]

Continue reading about 400 years of Yorkshire history in the world’s most comprehensive repository of Yorkshire family history records

The following update comes from DeceasedOnline. There are several useful links on this update: “Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council is a large local unitary authority in Southern Lancashire immediately to the north of Bolton (within Greater Manchester) and sandwiched between the Boroughs of Chorley, Rossendale and Hyndburn and south of Ribble Valley. Besides the substantial […]

Continue reading about UK’s South Lancashire burial and cremation records go online

Sandy on September 29th, 2014

On September 29, 1939, Germany and the Soviet Union agreed to divide control of occupied Poland along the Bug River—the Germans taking everything west, the Soviets taking everything east. As a follow-up to the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact, (also known as the Hitler-Stalin Pact), that created a non-aggression treaty between the two behemoth military powers of Germany […]

Continue reading about Nazis and communists divvied up Poland 75 years ago today

The latest from the informative resource Scotland’s People: “Among the hundreds of thousands of Victorian Scots who can be found in the latest year of Valuation Rolls to be released on ScotlandsPeople are two of the most celebrated sportsmen of the era, the golfers Old Tom Morris and his eldest son Young Tom. Valuation rolls […]

Continue reading about Old Tom Morris’s terrible year: Scotland’s golfing dynasty

Sandy on September 24th, 2014

After an amazing Season 1, Season 2 on PBS with Henry Louis Gates Jr. looks like another winner:

Continue reading about Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr Season 2

The latest update from Fold3 is as follows: “One of Fold3’s newest titles is the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies. Like its name suggests, this collection contains the two navies’ official reports, orders, and correspondence from the Civil War. If you’re interested in the Civil War, this is the go-to title for contemporary, […]

Continue reading about Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies a Fold3 update

Dear Scotland, I thankfully don’t have any skin in the game and will view the outcome of the Scottish Independence vote with interest from afar. Please vote with your heads and not your hearts. Remember, a marriage is with the heart, a divorce with the head. That said, a little bird told me those North Sea […]

Continue reading about The world awaits the outcome of the Scottish vote for independence

PERSI is an amazing resource for family historians and genealogists. If you haven’t heard about it before I’d like to share the following explanation with you from FamilySearch.org: “The Periodical Source Index, or PERSI, is the largest subject index to genealogy and local history periodical articles in the world.[1] Created by the staff of the Allen County […]

Continue reading about The Periodical Source Index (PERSI) is the largest subject index to genealogy and local history periodical articles in the world.

Sandy on September 14th, 2014

On September 13, 1814, Francis Scott Key penned a poem which was later set to music 117 years later in 1931 became America’s national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The poem, originally titled “The Defense of Fort McHenry,” was written after Key witnessed the Maryland fort being bombarded by the British during the War of 1812. […]

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On September 12, 1953, Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy, the future 35th president of the United States, married Jacqueline Bouvier in Newport, Rhode Island. Seven years later, the couple became the youngest president and first lady in American history. Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy was born into a prominent New York family in 1929, and became an […]

Continue reading about 1953 Wedding anniversary of President John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier in Newport, Rhode Island

Sandy on September 11th, 2014

Continue reading about Remembering 9/11 thirteen years ago today

Sandy on September 10th, 2014

Right up there with our own National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), with it’s amazing collection of resources, take a look at the British National Archives. Whether you’re looking for ancestors or want to learn more about British History to helps you understand your ancestor’s life experiences, it’s probably the best resource. Did you know? If immigrants arrived in Britain from […]

Continue reading about News from the United Kingdom’s National Archives

Sandy on September 9th, 2014

If you’re looking for ancestors in Northeast England, Durham Records Online provides records from County Durham and Northumberland for genealogists and historians. The latest updates with links are as follows: Wingate Grange marriages 1842-1907 updated with occupations, witnesses, abodes Winston burials 1573-1761 Gateshead baptisms 1769-1812 Stockton Holy Trinity baptisms 1838-1852 Trimdon marriages 1837-1852 Merrington marriages […]

Continue reading about The latest updates from Durham Records Online U.K.

According to Bloomberg News, executives at Scotch whisky suppliers Pernod Ricard, maker of The Glenlivet single malt, and Diageo are among those concerned about the economic consequences of a vote for Scottish independence on September 18, 2014. The following article written by Peter Evans for the Wall Street Journal is timely. This is probably a […]

Continue reading about British business men get Scottish independence jitters as polls narrow for historical vote

Sandy on September 7th, 2014

Ray Liotta has an interesting has an interesting perspective on being adopted.HHe shares how he met his birth parents and biological siblings in his 40s:

Continue reading about Ray Liotta opens up about being adopted

We the people”are finally getting smarter and let’s hope we all remain smart through the November elections. Take a look the epic resignation letter below written by a Congressional staffer that has finally come to light via the New York Daily news with the original posted on Jezebel. Don’t forget to click on the link to Jezebel.com below to […]

Continue reading about Congressional staffer EPIC resignation letter: ‘I’ve f—–g had it’ … ‘F–k you people’

The National Genealogical Society (NGS) on how family photos can undercover rare genetic disorders. There is also a link to a Newsweek article. See below: Though many of us research our ancestry to learn about whom we come from and the circumstances of their life, another aspect can be to compile a health history.  Whether we […]

Continue reading about Scanning family photos can reveal rare genetic disorders