Sandy on June 30th, 2011

According a report from the US National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) our National Parks are in bad condition. This is apparently caused by a myriad of effects such as, pollution, invasive species, climate change, energy and land development, and chronic funding shortfalls. The study by the NPCA took 10 years to complete and it is […]

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Sandy on June 29th, 2011

Grow Your Own Family Tree says: “One of the most comprehensive records of the Irish 1916 Easter Rising has been released in a fully searchable structured index for the first time. The Sinn Féin Rebellion Handbook was published by the Irish Times in 1917 and provides a fascinating insight into one of the most important […]

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Sandy on June 29th, 2011

Online giant Google has unveiled its new social networking project Google+. It’s a huge project that aims to place all of Google’s services on one social platform. It hopes to be a strong rival to Facebook to take first place in social networking. Similar to Facebook’s notification bar Google has redesigned its nativation bar to […]

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Sandy on June 29th, 2011

I’ve seen many books on the origins and function of Freemasonry but started to think about it on a more personal level after re-reading my grandfather’s obituary, which included the fact that he was a member of two Masonic lodges. After making a couple of inquiries I was informed that because of the secrecy involved […]

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I’ve written several blog posts about the Arlington Cemetery’s unconscionable mishandling of remains and the latest update by the Washington Post points to the continued  FBI criminal probe as well as the Army’s Criminal Investigation Command. The scope of the investigation is broad and includes seeking evidence of possible contracting fraud and falsification of records. […]

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Microsoft Office launched 365 today. It’s the online version of its popular software suite of Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint etc. and used every day by millions of people worldwide and a rival for Google Apps. The application has been beta tested since October and is designed to allow users to collaborate on documents, spreadsheets, and […]

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The following is an announcement posted on The Council of State Archivists website by David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States on the appointment of Debra Steidel Wall as Deputy Archivist of the United States, starting July 3, 2011: “I am pleased to announce the appointment of Debra Steidel Wall as Deputy Archivist of […]

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If you’ve been searching for an ancestor in the right place only to discover that you were looking in the wrong county, The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries could prove to be a great help. How often have you searched for an ancestor only to discover that although you were searching in the right place […]

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Up until a couple of years ago, the basic operations of our libraries hadn’t changed much since philanthropists like Andrew Carnegie donated more than $40,000,000 to build about 1,700 libraries in communities throughout the country. Now, the very existence of our libraries is threatened. Like many businesses, libraries all over the country—if they haven’t been […]

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Sandy on June 27th, 2011

The following post appeared on the Family Search blog. The FamilySearch.org website provides a continuing learning experience in genealogy and it’s free: “Those of Irish ancestry are well aware of Ireland’s turbulent, troubled history and costly fight for independence. Adding to Ireland’s painful saga was the bloody Irish Civil War fought between1922-1923. One of the […]

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I’ve just finished reading an amazing article in the Monterey County Weekly about a dedicated family historian’s 21-year quest to uncover his ancestors. His story starts out like many others, using the same popular resources that most of us are familiar with, but the results are astounding. Gary Carlsen was cleaning his attic in 1990 […]

Continue reading about Family Historian’s research reveals 18,000 direct and in-law relatives dating back to 1847

Sandy on June 24th, 2011

Findmypast.co.uk has just released a huge index and images of  WO96 militia records for 1806-1915. The records are a valuable resource for genealogy research.  See below: “We’ve just published over half a million Militia Service Records, covering 1806 to 1915, in association with The National Archives and in partnership with FamilySearch. This is the first time these records […]

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As reported in the UPI.com article today, a congressional subcommittee was informed that 59 boxes of records about people buried in Arlington National Cemetery have been discovered in an unsecured Virginia storage locker. The records contained the names and social security numbers of the deceased, but officials believe the security risk is low. The boxes […]

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Sandy on June 24th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Ancestry.com “There is nothing like meeting and connecting with fellow genealogists. So mark your calendar and join Ancestry.com at the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Washington, DC, August 14-19. This is the 31st year that IAJGS (International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies) has hosted this conference and we’re […]

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Sandy on June 23rd, 2011

The East India Company was created as a Royal Charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I (1533 – 1603) . It has been said that without it the world would not be the same today. It changed the world’s tastes, it’s thinking and it’s people by creating new communities, trading places, and shaped countries and established […]

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Sandy on June 22nd, 2011

FindMyPast.co.uk says: “Adding to our British Army Service Records 1760-1915 collection, we have just published over 500,000 soliders’ records in our Militia service records 1806-1915. These records offer a rich source of information to the family historian, especially because attestation papers form a major part of this collection. Attestation refers to the papers drawn up upon […]

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Sandy on June 22nd, 2011

The publisher of WhitePages in Australia, Sensis, has noted the increasing popularity of non-Anglo surnames in the most populous state of Australia, New South Wales. And, the change is big. Apparently the Nguyens (pronounced Win or Wynne) are making good ground on the Joneses. Typical Aussie names like Smith, Jones and Brown are still leaders […]

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“The Brooklyn Historical Society’s four-story Queen Anne style building was completed in 1881 and was designed by architect George B. Post. Post’s bold use of extensive terra cotta ornamentation on the façade, and innovative truss system to support the ceiling of the central library, has long been revered by architectural historians.” Plans for interior renovations […]

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Sandy on June 20th, 2011

One of the world’s largest collections of historic books, pamphlets and periodicals housed at the British Library at, 96 Euston Road, London, are to be scanned by Google and made available on the Internet in a deal reached with Google. The deal is to scan 250,000 texts dating back to the 18th century will allow […]

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If, like me, you’ve been researching on FamilySearch.org for several years and have been accustomed to finding things on the old site and are struggling with the new interface, you’ll be happy to know that you can now search for historical records using batch numbers from the International Genealogical Index (IGI). What’s a Batch Number? […]

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I found an  interesting post on The Genetic Genealogist blog about  a new browser-based software out there called Interpretone. It is likely to be useful in examining autosomal  DNA testing results from 23andMe and Lumigenix (along with American International Biotechnology Services and Precision Quality DNA) is currently under FDA scruitiny–the FDA views these services as ones that […]

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Sandy on June 15th, 2011

Why I would think that backroom politics happened during the Tudor and Stuart Early Modern period beats me. The UK National Archives has made available online documents exposing backroom politics from 1509-1714 for academic research as follows: “The largest set of government documents from the Early Modern period is now available online for academic research. […]

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Ian Tester of findmypast says: “Hello – I’m Ian Tester, the Product Manager for findmypast, and I wanted to let you know about a neat little project we’re in the middle of to make your experience of searching records a little better. You may have noticed recently that small blue stars have started appearing next […]

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Sandy on June 13th, 2011

Today, forty years after they were first leaked, all 7000 pages of the Pentagon Papers are finally declassified and publicly released. They have been released in book form more than once. And, as it turns out, those texts were incomplete. Now that everything has been made public the papers can now be read in their […]

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The DNA test results for a family member have just come in and we’re amazed at the results. A few years ago, although I’d never considered it, I would have been wary of taking a DNA test. Because of the convincing security measures taken by the well-known testing services, there is probably more danger lurking […]

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Scotland’s Loch Ness monster was first written about in Adamnan’s Life of Columba, in which the missionary described how St. Columba persuaded a fierce sea creature to close its jaws and go in peace instead of devouring a  fellow monk. The first newspaper account of a sighting of the monster was not until 1933,when the […]

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Sandy on June 8th, 2011

The National Genealogical Society says: “The National Genealogical Society proudly announces the release of its newest American Genealogy Studies course, Introduction to Civil War Records,developed by renowned military expert Craig Roberts Scott, cg. Craig Roberts Scott is a nationally recognized lecturer, educator, and genealogical and historical researcher with more than thirty years’ experience. He is a member of […]

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Sandy on June 6th, 2011

I found this article  posted on Chris Paton’s blog Scotland’s Greatest Story today and by extension EOGN. I often read “The Scotsman” newspaper online and missed this one. The things people do never ceases to amaze me. “A member of the IT staff at the National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk) has pleaded guilty at Edinburgh Sheriff […]

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FindMyPast is rapidly improving the content of their database and I have to say that I’ve located ancestors that haven’t appeared anywhere else. Here’s the latest: “Following the recent launch of our improved death records search, we’ve been delving into the records to see what we can find. As well as our own ancestors, we’ve discovered […]

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The British Royal Family has come a long way in the past two generations, especially Queen Elizabeth II (and 1st of Scotland) who was likely thrust into a new reality when she agreed to the divorce of Prince Charles and that of her children Prince Andrew and Princess Anne. Not to mention the behavioral patterns […]

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Sandy on June 4th, 2011

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. I enjoyed this article and hope that you will too. “Do you ever have a need to delete all the information on […]

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Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

On the first Friday of June each year, National Doughnut Day is celebrated by the Salvation Army who created it in 1938 to honor the women who served donuts to soldiers during World War I. Many doughnut stores in the United States offer free doughnuts on National Doughnut Day. In 2009, small doughnut vendors as […]

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Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

As of Monday, June 6th, when you make copies in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) research rooms in the Washington, area they will be printed on Windsor Blue paper. This is being done to help delineate which papers were copied on NARA equipment or printed at one of the public use PC printers […]

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Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

Last year’s New Zealand Family History Fair was a great success and over 1000 visitors enjoyed the event that included free access to Ancestry.com, Findmypast, The Genealogist, Footnote, My Heritage, World Vital Records, and FamilyRelatives. Quite a lineup. This year’s fair schedule to take place 26 – 27 August, at Claudelands Events Centre in Hamilton […]

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Paula Hinkel, Director, Vice President at Southern California Genealogical Society. Co-Chair, Southern California Genealogy Jamboree has posted the following message on LinkedIn: “This is the last call for Jamboree pre-registration, which closes 11:59 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, June 1. This email will list links to all of the Jamboree activities in the SCGS online shopping cart. […]

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Sandy on June 2nd, 2011

The following is a news release from Generation Maps now renamed Family ChartMasters: “Cedar Hills, Utah. — June 1st, 2011 — Generation Maps, the leading genealogy chart printing service, announces today that it is changing its name to Family ChartMasters. “We’ve decided to rename in order to simplify and focus our message on exactly what […]

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Wow! my Google alert request actually provided me with current information. The National Library of Scotland (NLS) has invited people to have their say on their Gaelic Language Plan. When I was young, Scottish Gaelic was considered a dead language with only a few people still using it in the west highlands and islands. Although […]

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FindMyPast.co.uk says: “We have just published 42,291 new London Probate Index records on findmypast.co.uk Most of the records are from 1750 to 1858 – although we have around 70 records outside that date range – and they may prove very useful in providing more detail about London ancestors. The records come from the London Probate Index […]

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