Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The Magna Carta (Great Charter) is an English charter that was originally issued in the year 1215 and then reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. It included the most direct challenges to the monarch’s authority and first became law in 1225. The 1297 version and the most commonly known still remains on the statute books of England and […]

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According to Toronto’s CTV news,  on Thursday July 28th archaeologists in Dresden, Ontario began a search using high-tech ground penetrating radar to find lost graves at the Uncle Tom’s Cabin historic site in southwestern Ontario, Canada.  The site is owned and operated by the Ontario Heritage Trust. Ground-penetrating radar sends radar waves into the ground […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

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Sandy on July 29th, 2011

If, like me, you didn’t realize that the General Motors Corporation Cadillac was originally owned by the Cadillac Automobile Company the country’s leading luxury automaker you’ll be interested to learn that on July 29, 1909, the newly formed General Motors Corporation  (GM) purchased the Cadillac  for $4.5 million. Cadillac  grew from the  ruins of automotive […]

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The following information from Brigham Young University (BYU) sounds as though their Conference on Family History and Genealogy will be fascinating as well as educational: “The 43rd annual BYU Conference on Family History and Genealogy may not be making history, but participants are preparing to find it. Approximately 600-700 participants are taking part in more […]

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Staff at the ScotlandsPeople center said in a news update that they were excited to find an entry in the 1841 Census for South Uist (an island that lies off the west coast of Scotland) confirming that many people had emigrated from that Island to Cape Breton in Nova Scotia. It’s unusual to find comments […]

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The British Mail Online News has posted some amazing online color photographs from World War II. Usually these war time photograpsh have only been seen in black and white. The new color images show the devastation caused by Nazi bombings on London. “These images were released to mark the 70th anniversary of Winston Churchill’s “V […]

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“Findmypast.co.uk has released over 290,000 new parish records going back the the sixteenth century covering Warwickshire, Sheffield, Suffolk and Rugby. The records provide essential plugs to gaps in the records and may prove vital in enabling you to trace your ancestors. Have a look at the detail in the table below: Church and type Number of […]

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Archaeologists in the Black Sea town of Zozopol in Bulgaria have unearthed the main church of a 14th century Byzantine monastery built by the last dynasty of the Eastern Roman Empire. Funded by the Bulgarian government, Dr Krastina Panayotova’s team of archaeologists  uncovered the St. Apostles monastery church, a small cemetery chapel, and a feudal […]

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Amy Sell of Findmypast.co.uk has released the following records: “WOMEN IN BUSINESS CELEBRATED IN NEWLY RELEASED RECORDS Fascinating Business Indexes released online Banned female author Radclyffe Hall of contentious novel The Well of Loneliness listed Celebrated British companies Cadburys, Barclays, Rolls Royce, Lyons, and Harrods all included Set against the backdrop of the early twentieth century, […]

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Sandy on July 14th, 2011

According to Richard Hill’s post on his DNA Testing Adviser web site: “DNA Heritage ceased operations in April 2011 and transferred existing customer results to Family Tree DNA. FTDNA has now announced the conversion program. The Y-DNA conversion to the basic 25-marker level is free. Existing DNA Heritage customers should click the link below and opt […]

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Sandy on July 14th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Findmypast.co.uk: “We are very proud to announce the launch of four sets of nineteenth and twentieth century military records to help enrich your family history. The records provide useful detail including attestation and leaving dates, achievements made in service and soldiers’ physical appearence. And, certainly in the case of the […]

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As a reminder, iOS is Apple’s mobile operating system originally developed for the iPhone it has been developed to support other Apple devices such as iPad, iPod touch and Apple TV. It’s not available for Android. That said, this blog post is about the latest App for iOS the Wolfram Genealogy and History Research Assistant […]

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This post is not about an ancient Chinese dynasty it’s an amazing story of the genealogy of New York’s Wu-Tang Clan, an infamous organization with roots in Staten Island, New York.  It’s only one of the subcultures that arose as masses of Chinese and Southeast Asian immigrants flooded to New York in search of better lives. […]

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According to an article in the Guysborough Journal  the Guysborough Historical Society (GHS) has opened a new research center in thebasement of the Old Courthouse Museum. It’s available for use by visitors and locals for genealogical research. Easy and safe access to museum archives, books and records is available year-round. The GHS also hopes that […]

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Sandy on July 11th, 2011

The following announcement was printed in the Augusta Chronicle: “Carrie Adamson, the founder and lifetime honorary president of the Augusta Genealogical Society, died Wednesday of natural causes. Adamson was a local historian, creating the Augusta Genealogical Society in 1979 with her husband, Lt. Ray Adamson and 84 other charter members. Adamson was born in Clearfield, […]

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Sandy on July 11th, 2011

On June 29, I blogged about Google+ challenges to Facebook in the realm of social networking and, as an old IT person I check to see what’s new in technology on a regular basis not only for my own benefit, but also to share technology  on SpittalStreet that might be of use to genealogists. According […]

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I got such a kick out of this week’s “Genealogy In Time” newsletter that I just had to post and share it on SpittalStreet.com. Please note the warning in the text: “At GenealogyInTime™ magazine, we notice people often make the same mistakes over and over again when building their family tree. Sometimes these mistakes are subtle […]

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Two hundred and thirty-four years ago today, the independent state of New York elected its first governor, Brigadier General George Clinton. In addition to being New York’s longest-serving governor, he was also the longest-serving governor of the United States. Clinton held the post from 1777-1795 and again from 1801-1804. He was also elected to the […]

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Sandy on July 8th, 2011

FindMyPast.co.au says: “Today sees the world premiere of the final Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (part two). It’s therefore very apt that this should also be the day that findmypast.co.uk discovers a wizard in the 1911 census! John Watkins Holden had been born in Worcester but was lodging at a house in […]

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Sandy on July 8th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “If you haven’t visited FamilyTreeMaker.com recently, it’s time to take another look. Recently, Family Tree Maker launched its newly redesigned website with simplified navigation and more features to help you find answers to your questions. Here are a few highlights: A tour of the software shows some of the key features and tools available in […]

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The Maori’s of New Zealand wrote a collection of 19th century manuscripts recording their lives before the arrival of Europeans. These records have been officially listed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World New Zealand register. UNESCO was established in 1945 by the United Nations to promote the exchange of ideas, information and culture. Found among […]

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The Japanese samurai warriors were members of the military class of pre-industrial Japan. By the end of the 12th century, the word samurai became almost synonymous with Bushido (the way of the warrior), the word was closely associated with the middle and upper echelons of the warrior class. Samurai used a wide range of weapons, […]

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Following a court-ordered search, an estimated $22 billion worth of gold, jewels and statues has been discovered in a southern India 16th century Sri Padmanabhaswamy temple. It’s the largest find of this type in India and there’s likely to be more. On Monday searchers started to unseal Section B of the vaults, a large space […]

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The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

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The following announcement comes today from Ancestry.com. It’s dated June 13, 2011 so unless I’m living in an alternate reality, today’s date is June 6, 2011: “Thousands of stars of the early silver screen detailed in Motion Picture Studio Directories Records include Charlie Chaplin, “Fatty” Arbuckle and Oliver Hardy (images available) Directories reveal ‘vital statistics’ […]

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Sandy on July 6th, 2011

MyHeritige.com has posted information today about a new offering called Family Goals which permits families to split the bill on Premium and PremiumPlus subscriptions. This enables family members to chip in to cover the costs thus making family history research more affordable and, at the same time, encourage the wider family to become more connected […]

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When you make the decision to research your family tree you may want to ponder a while before you proceed, just to make sure that you’ll be able to accept what you uncover. People normally share stories about the good things of life or sad stories with happy endings, leaving out the shocking realities that […]

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The following is a very informative press announcement from Ancestry.com: “New collection to help families discover connections to American freedom fighters is available FREE from June 30 – July 4. In honor of Independence Day, Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource,  today launched theSons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970, a collection of […]

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