Sandy on August 31st, 2011

FamilySearch.org has added the following records to it’s enormous database: “Austria, Mexico, Peru, U.S. Each Add Over a Million Records FamilySearch.org added over six million records to its free online database this week. The new collections include seigniorial records from Austria; civil registrations from Chihuahua, Mexico; and probate records from Kentucky, U.S. Also added this week […]

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On 16 April 1746, about 6 miles from Inverness, Scotland, the  Battle of Culloden Moor was fought. This  was the last battle fought on Scottish soil and was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite (Jacobus is Latin for James) rebellion led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie), against the English Duke of […]

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Sandy on August 30th, 2011

Alan Stewart of Grow Your Own Family Tree publishes a lot of great information on his blog  and the latest is as follows: “TheGenealogist.co.uk has now added a large collection of new Australian records to its Diamond Premium subscription. The records add convict lists, census, general musters, ledger returns and the First Fleet, which was the name given […]

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Sandy on August 27th, 2011

I’ve written a couple of times about the scandalous situation at Arlington National Cemetery regarding the mismatched and unmarked graves and mismanagement of records which prompted an FBI criminal probe If you’d like to read my articles to get up to speed click on the links: Arlington National Cemetery records found in an unsecured storage […]

Continue reading about Troops photograph Arlington graves every night

In addition to the Facebook contest information in my recent post, I’m adding the following press release from Ancestry.com for additional information: “Enhanced Collection also Features Celebrity Yearbook Photo Gallery of Today’s Stars before They Became Famous PROVO, UTAH – August 24, 2011 – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family historyresource, today announced a massive expansion […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com Expands U.S. School Yearbook Collection To Include More Than 150 Million Records of Relative’s School Days

If you’re lucky enough to have visited the Smithsonian Museum you’ll already know it’s always free. Here’s an wonderful event sponsored by the Smithsonian for free admission to an impressive list of museums throughout the country. All you need to do is to complete an online form and then select the museum you’d like to […]

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Sandy on August 25th, 2011

I read a disturbing post on the DNA Consultants blog about a lady called Marcy who had a bad experience with a DNA company who manipulated her test results and likely those of other clients. After reading Marcy’s story, I do agree  when questions arise from the  results of a DNA test that vendors, even […]

Continue reading about Rigged genetics! Say it ain’t so

Here’s the latest sweepstakes information from Ancestry.com: “Ancestry.com has just announced a massive expansion of the world’s most extensive searchable collection of U.S. school yearbooks available online. It now totals over 35,000 and carries 155 million records encompassing the years 1884 to 2009. The U.S. Yearbook Collection includes close to seven million images from thousands […]

Continue reading about U.S. Yearbooks Collection Gets Major Upgrade/New Photo Sweepstakes on Facebook

The following is the latest announcement from FamilySearch.org:  “Because of what we learned from your feedback in the Record Search Pilot, several features that were part of the pilot test will be carried over into the next release of FamilySearch. Some of these features will be available right away, while others may take several months […]

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Here’s an interesting announcement from Family Tree DNA: “We are pleased to inform you about the launch of a new feature “Third Party” uploads. This will allow for the upload of 33 and 46-marker Y-DNA test results from Ancestry, GeneTree or Sorensen’s SMGF. This was a natural development since the necessary tools were created to […]

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Sandy on August 22nd, 2011

Rose O’Neal Greenhow a wealthy widow who lived in Washington at the outbreak of the Cival War was a renowned Confederate spy. As a leader in Washington, D.C. society during the period to prior the American Civil War, she traveled in important political circles cultivating  friendships and  using her connections to pass along key military information to the Confederacy at the […]

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Sandy on August 21st, 2011

I’ve seen many comments stating that genealogy has become one of the most popular hobbies around today and, in spite of this, the word genealogy is also reported to have an identity crisis. For many people the word conjures a picture of senior citizens sharing conversation starting with “In my day…” According to a quote […]

Continue reading about Genealogy is a fun way for kids to discover the past

The following is an article written by Allison Meany for the Sun News that describes a Civil War Ghost Trail program scheduled to take place on September 14, in Rorth Ridgeville, Ohio, public library: “Lorain Public Library System’s North Ridgeville Branch will host a free “Civil War Ghost Trail” program at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 […]

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Sandy on August 19th, 2011

The following is an announcement released yesterday, Thursday, August 18,  from Footnote.com, which has now been renamed Fold3. Going forward Fold3 will focus on producing the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available: “Today we announced our intention to create the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available on […]

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An article published on LinkedIn reveals yet another privacy concern with Facebook and I’d like to share it with you.  And, I agree with the author that it’s “the scariest thing I’ve seen all day”. It’s a ranking algorithm probably based on whose profile you look at, who you chat with and who you’ve recently […]

Continue reading about Beware! bookmarklet shows the activity and people you’re active with on Facebook

Early plans have been made public in Edinburgh, Scotland, for a new festival of Scottish history during the month of November of this year. The event is being organized by Ian Harrower and comedian Susan Morrison who plan a ten-day festival involving the city’s museums, libraries, archives, local cafes, bars and shopping centers. The festival […]

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Sandy on August 18th, 2011

Ancestry.com press release says: “PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April […]

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The following is the most up-to-date information about digital convict records to be published by the UK National Archives. The records are to be transcribed, digitized and published online by Brightsolid. There’s a link to the Brightsolid website which were you can read some interesting facts about the company:  “The National Archives’ crime, courts and […]

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Sandy on August 16th, 2011

Actress Ashley Judd thought her great-great-great grandfather had lost his leg in the prison camp in Andersonville. The fact is that her ancestor lost his leg in the Battle of Saltville, Virginia and learned the truth from George Wunderlich, executive director of the National Museum of Civil Ware Medicine in Frederick, Maryland. The information was discovered […]

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Here’s some interesting news from FindMyPast.co.uk about a fundamental change to be made to the way the site is organized. The changes should make it a lot easier for you to find and search the millions of new records being added to their database every month: “Findmypast has grown an awful lot since we last […]

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At the beginning of the 19th century the Industrial Revolution had a strong foothold in the Scottish city of Glasgow with the manufacture of cotton and textiles, chemicals, glass, paper and soap. People from the Highlands in the north moved to the area in the 1820s and, later in the 1840s, immigrants arrived from Ireland […]

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A couple of days ago FamilySearch.org announced that their new FamilySearch Film Ordering System is available in the U.S. Northwest/West Area. This is in addition to other areas that have current access of the system.  The announcement also lists which areas will be available soon including Australia, New Zealand and Belgium: “This announcement is to […]

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Sandy on August 11th, 2011

A free webinar has been announced by Legacy Family Tree on Monday, August 15, 2011, at 2:00 p.m. ET. I’ve attended these webinars in the past and have always learned something. I’ve signed up to attend and decided to pass the following notice along to the readers of SpittalStreet: Google+ the Next Big Thing a free […]

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Sandy on August 10th, 2011

In his memoirs written in 1955, Harry Truman wrote a few pages on his decision to drop an atom bomb on the city of Hiroshima. He wrote, “I regarded the bomb as a military weapon and never had any doubt that it should be used. The top military advisors to the President, recommended its use, […]

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The saying “dead man walking” didn’t cut the mustard in comparison to what Tremayne Gray had to experience. Mr. Gray’s plight is one that is similar to thousands of Americans who are mistakenly reported dead every year by the Social Security Administration or other federal agencies. Illinois reportedly has one of the highest rates of […]

Continue reading about False government death reports leave people in the lurch

Sandy on August 8th, 2011

From the UK National Archives: “To celebrate the centenary of the 1911 census, The National Archives is holding a one-day conference, Celebrating the Census, on 1 October. Places are limited and are available on a first come first served basis, so book early to guarantee your place. You could also win two tickets for the conference […]

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Chris Paton says: “Ancestral Scotland (www.ancestralscotland.com) is offering 30 free ScotlandsPeople credits, worth £7, to overseas residents in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The credits can be used at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk to view Scottish vital and census records (about 4 digitised records and two LDS 1881 census transcriptions views – wills and Arms not included).” Click […]

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We’ve been hearing on the news that Texas is experiencing one of the worst drought in the history of the state, it’s actually helping archaeologists unearth a little piece of America—a graveyard for freed slaves. Two graves have been uncovered that are believed to have been there for more than a hundred years. According to […]

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Sandy on August 4th, 2011

If you’ve ever visited Scotland you’ll remember that just about every shop with a focus on tourism has shortbread on its shelves. Shortbread is often given as a Christmas gift but it is a definite feature of Scotland’s New Year festivities. A Scottish New Year (Hogmanay) custom is to eat shortbread on New Year’s Eve. […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

FamilySearch.org says: “Records of the Swedish American Churches are a great source for genealogical information and especially for helping to establish the place of origin in Sweden. Many of the Swedish-American church records kept in American are of the same high quality found as the records of Sweden. Sweden had a State Church (1527 to […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

I saw this post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and wanted to pass it along his reference to intimate details that people share on Facebook all the while they protest sharing census information: “They may not mind sharing their most intimate details up on Facebook, but the majority of Australians want their census records destroyed for […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

According to a Reuters London article that appeared on the West Australian newspaper site,  geneticists in Zurich, Switzerland, have reconstructed the DNA profile of the boy Pharaoh and have concluded that  up to 70 percent of British men and half of all the Western European men are related to Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun. Apparently King Tut […]

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The Royal Museum of Scotland has finally reopened to the public after a £47 million (pounds Sterling) transformation.  It’s a moment thousands of people from the capital city of Edinburgh (pronounced Edinburra) and many visitors from around the world have been waiting for. The  light-filled Victorian building with its soaring Grand Gallery was cherished for […]

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Some of you may have read in newspaper or heard on TV that the journal Science stated that they had discovered that a genetic signature could predict longevity. I’d like to share a blog post by 23andMe informing readers that the authors have formally retracted the longevity study as follows: “Last summer, a study published in the […]

Continue reading about Controversial DNA longevity paper formally retracted