Sandy on September 30th, 2011

Has Jeff Bezos of Amazon produced a quality cheaper alternative to Apple’s iPad?  Hmm… it all depends on what you need and, for many, this probably begins starting with the attractive price of $199.  Added to that, the 7-inch display that makes it about half the size of iPad and ideal for slipping into a […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Here’s some information from Ancestry.com about today’s release of Family Tree Maker 2012, which provides you with a description of the improvements made in this latest upgrade. If you’d like to purchase it,  you can click on the graphic above and it’ll take you to where you need to go… “Ancestry.com announced the release of […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

The following information was posted by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States: “The National Archives just joined iTunes U, a dedicated area within the iTunes Store giving users public access to thousands of free lectures, videos, books and podcasts from learning institutions all over the world.  If you already have iTunes on your […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “This week was a happy dance week for those of us with Irish roots.  Ancestry.com has posted indexes to Irish Civil Registrations which began in 1864 for births,  marriages, and deaths (1845 for non-Catholic marriages). In addition there is an index to births and baptisms that dates back to 1620, extracted from a variety of records. Three other collections that […]

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The website of the Oklahoma Tourism & Recreation Department is an interesting experience. It’s  simple yet displays a measure of creativity with a great visual impact and it’s easy to read. As a member of the Nation Genealogical Society (NGS), I check in often to see latest news.  Today it led me to Oklahoma’s Tourism […]

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Three months after the largest wildfire ever recorded on New Mexico state records, the National Parks Service (NPS) has reopened sections of the Bandelier National Monument to visitors. “The fire which began on June 26, burned over 60% of the park and altered much of the park landscape.” The visitor center, which contained the largest […]

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The following information is the latest from the Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) with thanks to Dick Eastman’s EOGN blog for pointing this one out: “Today, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) commemorates the 170th anniversary of the Canada Gazette by making accessible the digitized back issues, from 1841 to 1997, on its website dedicated to this […]

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Thanks to a partnership between the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and Google, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest known biblical manuscripts, are now available online in high-resolution format. The manuscripts, so fragile that they can’t be exposed to direct light, were discovered between 1947 and 1956 in caves along the shores of the Dean Sea, and […]

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Here’s the latest release of records from Findmypast.co.uk: “MANCHESTER ‘BAD BOYS’ REVEALED IN CITY ARCHIVE RECORDS RELEASED ONLINE Manchester prison and workhouse records included Charges include: indecent relations with a pig, and driving a contagious cow along a highway Victorian law and order likely to have punished today’s rioters more severely First execution listed at […]

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The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) has recently launched a beautiful website dedicated to Native American ancestry titled Trace Indian Ancestry offering helpful tips and information on researching the genealogy of your Native American ancestors: “To determine if you are eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, contact the tribe, or tribes, you […]

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The following post on DNA Consultant’s blog is fascinating, so I’m passing it along: “Almost a century ago, British anthropologist Alfred Cort Haddon traveled the world seeking samples of human hair, among other curios, for his ethnographic studies of native people. The samples, which lay in a museum drawer for 90 years, included hair from […]

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The National Library of Ireland is investigating a situation regarding a cache of more than 400,000 records released by a UK genealogy company infringes on its legal rights to the microfilms behind the records. Ancestry.com.uk published more than 40 million Irish birth, marriage and death records. According to the Irish Times, the files consist of […]

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Sandy on September 23rd, 2011

Slot canyons can be found in many parts of the world, mainly in areas with low rainfall. Some of the most well-known slot canyons can be found in the Southwestern United States, in the Pyrenees bordering France and Spain, the Sierra de Guara in northern Spain and, as headlined in this post, in the Blue […]

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Sandy on September 22nd, 2011

Some simple and effective tips on how to improve your online genealogy search from Family Tree magazine: “Improve your online ancestor searches with these pointers from Search Engine Tips and Tricks, a Family Tree University webinar presented by Lisa Louise Cooke: Save time with synonym searches. Rather than run separate searches on similar keywords, include a tilde (~) […]

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Sandy on September 22nd, 2011

Most of us realize that the Internet has changed family history research and a recent article in Desert News online describes how the next five years will accelerate the process making it more affordable and rewarding. The article “Family history in the future” was written by Paul Allen the famed co-founder and CEO of Ancestry.com […]

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Sandy on September 21st, 2011

The great Nez Perce leader known to non-Indians as Chief Joseph died on the Colville reservation in northern Washington on September 21, 1904. Nez Perce Him-mah-too yah-lat-kekt (“Thunder Rolling Down from the Mountains”) has been described by Europeans as a superhuman military genius and an Indian Napoleon, but he was actually more of a diplomat […]

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Sandy on September 20th, 2011

 On September 19, 1881, President James Garfield died, after surviving for nearly three months, from a close range gunshot wound inflicted by Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled job seeker. This was the final success of several previous attempts to shoot the President and Guiteau finally managed mortally wound the President with a pearl-handled pistol as he […]

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FamilySearch.org says: “FamilySearch.org added millions of new records this week including 11 new records collections. More than six million Hungary Catholic Church records were added, as well as four million Mexico civil registration records. Looking for records from China? Over a million new Chinese genealogies from 1500–1900 are now available for viewing. Begin searching for free at FamilySearch.org. Searchable records on FamilySearch.org are […]

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Sandy on September 19th, 2011

Although the Kansas City museum has exhibits about Anglo, Native American and African American heritage, officials are aware that be there has been a major gap in documenting Latino history, which goes back hundreds of years. An effort is currently underway to collect historical artifacts and documents for the museum collection. To this end, an […]

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Sandy on September 16th, 2011

Search for free in honor of Mexican Independence Day.  Paul Rawlins on Ancestry.com blog says: “One thing I learned as we launched the 1930 Mexico Census online is that Mexico is much more of a melting pot than I realized. Mexico’s 1930 national census (“El Quinto Censo General de Población y Vivienda 1930, México”) is called the […]

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Wade Mainer a singer and banjo pioneer whose definitive style and devotion to old-time mountain songs made him a pivotal figure in the transition to bluegrass music, died of congestive heart failure on Monday September 12, 2011, at the age of 104 in his home in Flint, Michigan. After joining his older brother at a […]

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I recently posted an article titled “The Battle of Culloden Moor 1746: The last battle ever to be fought on Scottish soil”  the last battle of the 1745 Jacobite rebellion in Scotland. I was intrigued to learn that the Royal Bank of Scotland Group is making history in 140 characters by using Twitter that will certainly […]

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Four tribal leaders have been recognized by the California State Assembly for their contributions to the promotion and preservation of Native American Indian history and culture in the state. The State Assembly announced on August 25 that ACR 72: California Native American Heritage Month was passed The bill was introduced by Assemblyman Luis A. Alejo […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

If you’ve been gathering your family history records over the years you will by now recognize the importance of records preservation. With this problem in mind, I suggest that you read a paper written by Gary T. Wright which is available on the FamilySearch.org website. It’s excellent and answers some of my own questions. Since […]

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If you live in California and have valid questions about participating in DNA tests, you’ll be interested to learn  that Jerry Brown has signed a bill into law that will prevent people from experiencing discrimination when buying a house, finding a job, health insurance, life insurance, getting a mortgage, and even education. In this day […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

When I recently discovered a couple of misspellings in my family tree (this happens a lot), I’ve had more than a couple of anxious moments wondering if I managed to change them all.  The following post by Tana Pederson on the ancestry.com blog is a very simple a useful way to remedy the situation with […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

The following is a news flash from Deceased Online:  “Deceased Online has a large stand at the Scottish Association of Family History Societies (SAFHS) annual conference, Adam House, Chambers Street, Edinburgh. You can meet some of our dedicated Scottish team on 25th June where we’ll be unveiling 400,000 Scottish burial and cremation records new to […]

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Sandy on September 11th, 2011

Shanksville Pennsylvania The Pentagon

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The Anazazi  were pueblo people who lived in the Four Corners area of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. “Anasazi (ah-nuh-SAH-zee) is a Navaho (more correctly, “Diné” or “Dineh”) word which, depending on pronunciation, means either “enemy ancestors” or “ancient people who are not us.” Many modern Puebloan descendants of the Anasazi object to the […]

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Sandy on September 10th, 2011

It’s not only journalism students who are taught to answer those, who, what, when, where, why, and how, questions used when analyzing the fruits of our research.  These questions can be applied to most subjects and certainly includes the evidence obtained from your genealogical sources. And, while it’s true in all instances that evidence varies […]

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Because of the changing needs of its customers, the National Library of Scotland (NLS) has plans in the works to update and develop services and functions for the 21st century. As one of the major research libraries in Europe, Scotland NLS is the only legal deposit library that has a copy anything published in the […]

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Sandy on September 7th, 2011

Another reminder from the National Genealogical Society (NGS): “This is such an exciting project for genealogists that we want to remind you about it. As the War of 1812 pensions are being digitized (see previous posts below and check out this FGS page) they are freely available to all at the Fold3 (previously Footnote) website. Currently about 69,000 […]

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The following is an informational announcement from the National Genealogical Society (NGS) about a new project funded project by The National Endowment for the Humanities: “The National Endowment for the Humanities has funded the project, “Biographies: The Atlantic Slaves Data Network” (ASDN). The ASDN will provide a platform for researchers of African slaves in the […]

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Ned Kelly was a famous Irish convict in Australia and, if you’re an Aussie you’ve often heard the expression, “As game as Ned Kelly”. In this context the word “game” means willing to face danger. Kelly was considered to be a “Robin Hood” type folk hero by some for his defiance against the British authorities […]

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“For immediate release  AYE AYE CAPTAIN – MERCHANT NAVY ARCHIVES REVEAL PHOTOS OF UK’S FORGOTTEN ‘FOURTH SERVICE’ Churchill’s ‘fourth service’ who helped to make Britain ‘Great’ Fascinating photos of British merchant mariners from 100 years ago A ‘floating United Nations’, women and men, young boys, ‘donkeymen’ and manicurists, as well as personal descriptions such as […]

Continue reading about 1 million Merchant Navy Seamen records published by findmypast today – many include photos!

Most of us have used Wikipedia, “the world’s largest and most popular encyclopedia” as a launching pad for research on every subject under the sun. Much to my surprise, I discovered that Wikipedia is part of a much larger organization called Wikimedia. So, what is Wikimedia? “The Wikimedia Foundation,  Inc. is a nonprofit charitable organization […]

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