Google Places is no more. Almost a year ago Google announced that the company would merge or integrate Google Places and Google+ Pages. Well, it is all happening today with Google Places pages entirely replaced by Google+ Local pages. Today, about 80 million Google Place pages have been automatically converted into 80 million Google+ Local pages. It […]

Continue reading about Google makes Google+ the center of gravity for local search

With a name like “Big Ben” one might think we’re talking about a North American grizzly bear. Big Ben is actually a famous clock on top of 320-foot-high St. Stephen’s tower. Those classic pictures of the British Houses of Parliament in London wouldn’t be the same without that famous tower-clock. If you’d been around to […]

Continue reading about Big Ben goes into operation in London 153 years ago today

Findmypast Ireland has made a second batch of records available from the Irish Petty Sessions books as follows: “Today we launch online the second batch of records from the Petty Sessions order books (1850-1910), one of the greatest untapped resources for those tracing their Irish roots. The original Petty Sessions records are held at the […]

Continue reading about Findmypast releases more records from the Irish Petty Sessions order books

Sandy on May 30th, 2012

The first million dollar allocation as part of a plan to restore historical monuments around the world is being distributed by American Express in conjunction with The World Monument Fund. The plan is to provide million dollar restoration to six historic landmarks located in Brazil, Mexico, India, New Zealand, Japan and the United Kingdom. Respected […]

Continue reading about A global plan to restore major historic landmarks

I’ve  found the International Genealogical Index (IGI) available at FamilysSearch.org very useful in the past. It has been a mix of community indexed sources and community contributed records. Apparently this mix meant that the records weren’t equally reliable. The problem is in the process of being resolved with the creation of two separate collections searchable […]

Continue reading about New search feature for the International Genealogical Index (IGI)

Sandy on May 29th, 2012

Family Search has a lot to offer and it’s free. There’s a new feature called My Source Box. It’s a useful new place to bookmark a source record and organize them into folders. People with access to the Family Tree can locate a record and add it to the source box for addition to the […]

Continue reading about My Source Box

Memorial Day is our federal holiday that originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the fallen. It is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. The ever popular patriotic song God Bless the U.S.A., written and recorded by Lee Greenwood, serves to remind us of the sacrifice by […]

Continue reading about Have a wonderful Memorial Day Celebration—God Bless the USA

The National Archives at San Francisco officially opened 40,000 case files on immigrants to the United States on May 22, 2012. The research room was dedicated to U.S. Representative Tom Lantos who pushed to have the files re-designated as records of permanent historical value. Transferred from the U.S. Cititzenship and Immigration Servives (USCIS), the files […]

Continue reading about 40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco

It would be hard to miss the promotion by FamilySearch.org of BillionGraves.com which is owned and operated by AppTime. Family Historians and Genealogists will love the constantly expanding database of records and images from cemeteries around the world. Digitized images of each gravestone will be tagged with GPS coordinates to make finding your ancestors an […]

Continue reading about BillionGraves.com makes finding your ancestors graves easy with mobile phone app

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMD) has announced the addition of 14 Portuguese-language newspapers published in California from 1855–1940 to its Portuguese-American Digital Newspaper Collection. As part of a collaborative project with the special collections J.A. Freitas Library, which is a special collections library owned and operated by the Supreme Council of P.F.S.A. in California […]

Continue reading about Historical Portuguese newspapers digitized by University of Massachusetts (UMD) online free of charge

A wooden hulled vessel believed to have sunk in an estimated 4000 feet of water about 200 miles off the Northern Gulf Coast shore by ocean researchers who were exploring the depths of the Gulf of Mexico. The shipwreck was laden with artifacts, such as, anchors, navigational instruments, glass bottles, cannons, boxes of muskets and […]

Continue reading about 200 year-old shipwreck found at a depth of 4000 feet in the Gulf of Mexico

The 1940 census has caused quite a stir in the genealogy and family history community. I’ve written about it several times with progress updates and I thought it has just about been covered by everyone.Wait up! there’s more. The fact that 1940 census has had amazing coverage in national publications is truly impressive. The best […]

Continue reading about The pre-war 1940 U.S. census is a factual gold mine for family historians

If you’re ancestors hailed from the counties of Suffolk and Kent in England you’ll be interested to know that Findmypast.co.uk has published more than 180,000 new parish records for Suffolk and North West Kent as follows: “The Suffolk Family History Society and North West Kent Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records, in association with the […]

Continue reading about England’s Suffolk and North West Kent parish records recently added to Findmypast

I’m sure the venue for next year’s National Genealogical Society’s in Las Vegas will be a popular one. The press release is as follows: “Arlington, VA, 17 May 2012. The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announced at their Family History Conference in Cincinnati last week that the 2013 NGS Family History Conference, Building New Bridges, will be […]

Continue reading about NGS 2013 Family History Conference in Las Vegas Building New Bridges

Sandy on May 21st, 2012

I’ve just read an interesting article posted online by the Irish Times regarding Y-DNA with which I agree. There’s a lot of sales patter and technical jargon out there, but the principle behind genealogical Y-DNA testing is simple and logical. The Y-DNA chromosome is passed along intact from father to son. A random mutation is […]

Continue reading about The realities of DNA testing

The following news release from Ancestry.com and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum World Memory Project marks the first anniversary of their partnership. There are three new collections including information on Poles, Jews, and other victims with more than 1.3 million records indexed from the museum’s archives: “WASHINGTON, DC/PROVO, UTAH, May 10, 2012 — Records […]

Continue reading about First anniversary of World Memory Project marked with more than 1.3 million records

Sandy on May 19th, 2012

When one thinks of Lawrence of Arabia the epic 1962 movie starring Peter O’Toole usually springs to mind. The movie characterizes Lawrence’s experience in Arabia during World War I, in particular his attacks on Aqaba and Damascus, as well as, his involvement in the Arab National Council. Known to the world as Lawrence of Arabia, […]

Continue reading about Who was Lawrence of Arabia?

Dr. Paul R. Billings, renowned genomics expert has been added to the Board of Directors at Ancestry.com. The press release is as follows:   “PROVO, Utah, May 16, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that renowned genomics expert Dr. Paul R. Billings has been appointed […]

Continue reading about Renowned genomics expert added to the Board of Directors at Ancestry.com

Devonshire, England, is a beautiful place, if you have ancestors who hailed from Devon the following 3.5 million records from Findmypast.co.uk will help you find them. For a small area 3.5 million is a lot of records: “Search new Plymouth and Devon parish records covering 3.5 million people and five centuries on findmypast.co.uk These records […]

Continue reading about New Plymouth and Devon records for 3.5 million people on Findmypast

Two priceless Catholic collections originally housed in the Blairs Seminary outside of Aberdeen, Scotland, are being returned to the area after 54 years to be housed this time at the University of Aberdeen. This is a big event given the dark history of the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland. In fact, the archives cover some […]

Continue reading about Priceless Catholic church collections to be returned to north-east Scotland after more than 50 years

The British National Archives has made Olympic and Paralympic documents and images available online for the 19th 20th and 21st centuries. This is a first. The new site called The Olympic Record has a timeline, which enables researchers to brows material from summer Olympics from the Athens games in 1896 to the Beijing games in 2008. […]

Continue reading about Olympic and Paralympic records now available online at British National Archives

It’s that time already! The next Roots Tech conference is scheduled to take place in Salt Lake City, Utah, from March 21-23, 2013. Even if you’re not planning to present the schedule the ideas for sessions in the following call for presentations appearing on the Upfront with NGS blog will be of interest: “The world […]

Continue reading about Call for presentations for the 2013 Roots Tech conference in Salt Lake City, Utah

If you’d like to learn what records are available and where to look at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), there’s a series of presentations available from archivists, volunteers and other experts who share their knowledge of the NARA records with you. To learn more about the program click on Know Your Records.

Continue reading about Know your records program from the National Archives and Records Administration

I’m enjoying Google’s effort to be more transparent and I enjoy learning new things that could be helpful in the future. Today’s post from Google is on the subject of emails and the routing process. For various different reasons, many of us wonder about the email routing process after we hit send. Google has a […]

Continue reading about After you hit send then what? Follow your email’s journey

After a run of three years NBC has decided not to renew the Ancestry.com genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are?  The news release from the Ancestry Investor Relations is as follows: “PROVO, Utah, May 13, 2012 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX) — Ancestry.com Inc. ACOM -11.97% , the world’s largest online family history resource, today commented on NBC’s […]

Continue reading about NBC decides not to renew Who Do You Think You Are?

On May 11, 1812, Spencer Perceval, Britain’s prime minister was shot to death in the lobby of the House of Commons by John Bellingham, a demented businessman. Bellingham who was enraged at his failure to get government compensation for war debts incurred in Russia immediately gave himself up to the authorities.  Though deemed insane, he […]

Continue reading about The assassination of British Prime Minister, Spencer Perceval

Sandy on May 11th, 2012

These days cloud computing is a hot topic and big business. Until very recently I was a skeptic on the subject of storing my files somewhere out there… Some of the many questions that came to mind were: Is it safe? Is this going to cost me a lot of money? Will it start out […]

Continue reading about Can you trust Cloud Computing?

What can you do with 1000memories Shoeboxes? A lot. You can preserve your photos sitting in your old albums and, yes, you can find additional backup for your more recent projects when you spent countless hours storing precious memories on your hard drives or flash drives. Virtual shoeboxes store your photos created around an event […]

Continue reading about Creative organizing and collaboration tool from 1000Memories releases ShoeBox App for Android and iPhone.

Sandy on May 9th, 2012

GenDetective is a genealogy software from RumbleSoft that’s different from most commercial databases on the market today.  It has been described as “a tool that analyzes your genealogical data to produce research recommendations based on missing or incomplete data”.  The software is planned to enable the genealogist to hone his/her research and actually points out additional […]

Continue reading about RumbleSoft Releases GenDetective Version 1.5

The following is some welcome news from FamilySearch.org about their 1940 indexing project, as they prepare to upload the latest data on the 1940 census. This is a great reminder that the organization has so much to offer free of charge: “We did it. We passed the 100,000 mark. Today’s report shows that we have […]

Continue reading about 1940 US Census Indexing Progress Report from Family Search

Ancestry.com has released a database containing membership cards with details on women who joined the Cadet Nurse Corps created during WWII as follows: “Historical Background After the United States entered World War II, the military’s needs quickly brought on a nursing shortage. To address the need, federal funding, administered by the Public Health Service, began […]

Continue reading about World War II Cadet Nursing Corps Card Files, 1942-1948 online at Ancestry.com

It was a big surprise to me to learn today that German submarines preyed on tankers on the east coast of the United States during WWII.  And, thanks to a touching human interest story, with interesting historical commentary, in today’s Charlotte Observer about a crew of British sailors who were buried in Ocracoke cemetery in […]

Continue reading about Son of British sailor buried in Ocracoke cemetery North Carolina to attend annual remembrance

It’s well-known that Irish genealogy research is difficult and often impossible because of the loss of many important records. I’ve touched on this problem before in my blog post The Lack of Irish Genealogical Records and a look at PRONI. On June 30, 1922 the records of the Irish Chancery were destroyed in an explosion […]

Continue reading about CIRCLE a new major internet resource for Irish Chancery Letters 1244-1509

Sandy on May 4th, 2012

Cinco de Mayo (May 5th) is a relatively minor holiday in Mexico, but in the United States it has evolved into a celebration of Mexican culture and heritage. Unfortunately, last year it heralded unrest and we got a glimpse through the media of not so great political activism. We can only hope that tomorrow’s celebration […]

Continue reading about Cinco de Mayo! Celebrating a rich culture

Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America.  He was what might be called today an all-round success (more like a brilliant all-round success), considering his expertise covered so many different areas. He was a “leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, […]

Continue reading about How to get what you want in life: 14 lessons from Benjamin Franklin a man who knew how to get things done

The old saying look before you leap applies to all information posted on the web and this even applies to the latest offering from the world’s most popular genealogy site. It’s interesting to see that Ancestry has named their Best Practices board of scientific advisors in the following news release: “PROVO, Utah, May 3, 2012 […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com launches new affordable DNA test analyzing over 700,000 marker locations

Sandy on May 2nd, 2012

Kathryn Rudy, a lecturer in the School of Art History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, has analyzed some 15th and early 16th-century European prayer books. The point of the study was to learn the reading habits of people who lived in medieval times and turned out to be a kind of forensic analysis […]

Continue reading about Dirty books reveal medieval reading habits

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle creator of Sherlock Holmes, like the rest of us, sometimes suffered from writers block, those days when creativity has stalled. Writing is hard work and clearly illustrates even our most famous writers had to practice their craft. The National Library of Scotland tells the story of manuscripts found, locked away upon […]

Continue reading about New stories from Sherlock Holmes’ creator discovered

Barnes & Noble Inc. stocks surged 68 percent to $23 yesterday in New York after announcing that Microsoft will invest $300 million in a new subsidiary that combines the bookseller’s Nook digital reader and college businesses. You’ll remember that the Nook e-reader was launched in 2009 to compete with Amazon’s Kindle, allowing users to buy, download […]

Continue reading about Microsoft and Barnes and Noble $300 million E-book deal

The following is an announcement from the National Archives and Records Administration regarding a new Microfilm Research Room: “A new Microfilm Research Room is scheduled to open on Monday, May 21, 2012, in the Robert M. Warner Research Center in the National Archives Building, Washington, DC. It will house 27 researcher carrels, 5 public use […]

Continue reading about New Microfilm Research Room set to open at the National Archives on May 21