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Here’s a good news statement from the office of the Governor of Georgia published yesterday October 18: “Gov. Nathan Deal and Secretary of State Brian Kemp announced today that the state will restore $125,000 to Kemp’s budget to keep the Georgia State Archives open to Georgians for the remainder of the budget year. “Georgia’s Archives […]

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The Jersey Journal has an interesting article which serves to remind us that Universities are often great resources to get some genealogy research. The article highlights Rutgers University’s Special Collections and University Archives as one of those resources especially if you’re researching colonial New Jersey. Daniel Kline,  author of the article, has first-hand knowledge of […]

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The following is a news release from Ancestry.com clearly illustrating the continued popularity of genealogy and family history research:   “PROVO, Utah, July 2, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, has added its two-millionth active current subscriber. The milestone recently was reached when Yvonne Ocheltree, of Collierville, Tenn., […]

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New indexed records and digital images have been added to the FamilySearch.org database as follows: “FamilySearch published new, free records online for Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, England, Georgia, Indonesia, Italy, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. The 1940 US Census Community Project continues to progress […]

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The DNA Consultants Blog is a great source of inspiration and information and yesterday’s post is an interesting read. Long before the days of DNA testing scientists, Thomas Jefferson and Constantine Rafinesque, demonstrated the genetic similarity between native Americans and Turkic peoples of the Altai region of southern Siberia. I thought the comment at the […]

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Sandy on April 17th, 2012

It doesn’t take much for most of us to remember the deadline for filing our taxes, here in the U.S., is upon us and to remember that we had a reprieve this year.  April 15, was Sunday and April 16 was designated as Emancipation Day in the District of Columbia. Today is it. Since we are […]

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From various historical sources, Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) is thought to be one of the most controversial figures in British history. Cromwell was considered a regicidal (murderer of a monarch) a dictator by some and a hero of liberty by others and his almost genocidal activities against Catholics in Scotland […]

Continue reading about British National Archives records reveal Christmas was once canceled

Hot on the heals of my article yesterday titled, Social Security Death Index (SSDI) no longer available to the public  about the denial of access to SSDI, I’m passing along worthwhile commentary published on Dick Eastman’s, Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, Genealogists are Losing Access to SSDI, Mostly Due to Misinformation, detailing a very interesting point of view regarding this loss […]

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Hot off the press: The following is a newsflash released today from Ancestry.com about their new mobile app that gives users the ability to access billions of historical records to build their new family tree:  “PROVO, Utah, Nov. 29, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced the […]

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Sandy on November 26th, 2011

The British Newspaper Archive has a Facebook page where you can read some interesting entries including some of the classic writers, assassination attempts on Queen Victoria, etc. Here’s a copy of their recent blog post with links to Facebook and Twitter– You can also sign up for their newsletter as follows: “To give people some […]

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The University of St Andrews, founded in 1413, is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English-speaking world. Talented researchers at St Andrews University, have officially launched a new online catalog of books published between the invention of print and the end of the 16th century. The work is the result of over […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s St. Andrews University 10-year treasure hunt leads to world’s first bibliography of the 16th century

Here’s the latest information from Ancestry.com about their Advanced Image Viewer: “Several years ago, we launched the Advanced Image Viewer. This viewer provided some much-needed capabilities and was welcomed by the users who could take advantage of it. Our other users – almost 50% of our total user base – continued to use a basic […]

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Sandy on November 10th, 2011

As you’ll see from the following news release from findmypast, England’s county of Cheshire is famous for more than the delicious cheese: “CHESHIRE REVEALED AS A WONDERLAND OF UNUSUAL FINDS AS NEW LOCAL RECORDS GO ONLINE Lewis Carroll’s baptism found in Daresbury,11 July 1832 Earthquake hit Cheshire on 18 March 1612 Ancestors of James Bond […]

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I’ve just read a wonderful and amusing essay written by Drew Moore published in The Fortnightly Review and titled “Genealogy in America”. (The original Fortnightly Review was one of the most important and influential magazines in nineteenth-century. This New Fortnightly Review in the age of technology is a fascinating discovery.) The essay/article describes how Mr. […]

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Sandy on November 2nd, 2011

Here’s another useful resource for family history researchers passed along by the National Genealogical Society (NGS): “The Georgia Historic Newspapers Collection (part of the Digital Library of Georgia) has a nice South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive. The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive spans the years 1845-1922 and includes the following titles: Albany News, 1870-1883 Albany Patriot, 1845-1866 Americus Times Recorder, […]

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I’d like an following  blog post written by David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, on the very important issue of “Releasing All We Can, Protecting What We Must.”: “In early October President Obama signed an Executive Order (EO) covering “Structural Reforms to Improve the Security of Classified Networks and the Responsible Sharing and Safeguarding of Classified […]

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Sandy on October 14th, 2011

“You can now search 10,529 records of WWII Escapers & Evaders on findmypast.co.uk These records are individual reports for allied service personnel about their experiences of escaping from prisoner of war camps or evading capture in Central Europe throughout WWII. Each entry will tell you the following key information about your ancestor: name, rank, number, […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “This week was a happy dance week for those of us with Irish roots.  Ancestry.com has posted indexes to Irish Civil Registrations which began in 1864 for births,  marriages, and deaths (1845 for non-Catholic marriages). In addition there is an index to births and baptisms that dates back to 1620, extracted from a variety of records. Three other collections that […]

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The following information is the latest from the Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) with thanks to Dick Eastman’s EOGN blog for pointing this one out: “Today, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) commemorates the 170th anniversary of the Canada Gazette by making accessible the digitized back issues, from 1841 to 1997, on its website dedicated to this […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

When I recently discovered a couple of misspellings in my family tree (this happens a lot), I’ve had more than a couple of anxious moments wondering if I managed to change them all.  The following post by Tana Pederson on the ancestry.com blog is a very simple a useful way to remedy the situation with […]

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Sandy on August 19th, 2011

The following is an announcement released yesterday, Thursday, August 18,  from Footnote.com, which has now been renamed Fold3. Going forward Fold3 will focus on producing the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available: “Today we announced our intention to create the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available on […]

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The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

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Sandy on July 6th, 2011

MyHeritige.com has posted information today about a new offering called Family Goals which permits families to split the bill on Premium and PremiumPlus subscriptions. This enables family members to chip in to cover the costs thus making family history research more affordable and, at the same time, encourage the wider family to become more connected […]

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In the Fall (Autumn) of 2011, The British Newspaper Archive will digitize millions of pages of newspapers making them available online. The British Libraries newspaper collection is probably the best in the world and the collection will contain most of the runs of newspapers published in the UK since 1800. This could prove to be […]

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As reported in a Boston Phoenix article, Google informed its partners that its News Archive project would stop accepting, scanning and indexing microfilm and other archival material from newspapers. Google has instead decided to focus its energies on “newer projects that help the industry, such as Google One Pass, a platform that enables publishers to […]

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Sandy on April 22nd, 2011

Six documents were declassified last week as part of the work of the National Declassification Center (NDC), regarding  secret writing as described in the documentation. The NDC was established within the National Archives at the direction of the President in 2009 with the task of reviewing more than 400 million pages of records by year […]

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Gale is Celebrating National Library Week from 10-24 April by giving you free access to select Gale resources as follows from NGS: “Gale NewsVault — access to more than 10 million digitized pages. This collection includes: 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers 19th Century British Library Newspapers 19th Century U.S. Newspapers 19th Century UK Periodicals: Empire 19th Century UK Periodicals: New Readerships

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“The 26th release of files from the Security Service MI5 reveals secret plans including assassination plots and use of poisons after the Second World War. This release contains 180 files, bringing the total of Secret Service files at The National Archives to 4,725. Many of the files are available at DocumentsOnline. You can download them for […]

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I’ve written about the merger of the National Archives of Scotland and the General Register Office for Scotland. This is to remind you that as of April 1, the merger will be completed: “From  1 April 2011 the name of the merged NAS-GROS organisation will be the National Records of Scotland (NRS) The strapline  for the new […]

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The following information was posted on the National Archives blog “NARations” including the link to the minutes of the February 18, meeting. Anyone involved in the research process will find this interesting. I’ve also provided a link to the NARations blog where you can see the very interesting blog comments: “The minutes from the Researcher […]

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Sandy on March 6th, 2011

Since I started to study genealogy and discovered a contradistinc approach to history, the genealogy and social history of Puerto Rico is one of the richest that I have so far encountered. Puerto Rico, nicknamed Land of Enchantment, has a unique heritage. Christopher Columbus claimed the island for Spain when he landed there in 1493 […]

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We are bombarded with so much data these days that we’re apt to overlook some excellent sources of genealogical information. One of these is the passport application. Would you believe, the U.S. Department of State has issued passports to people traveling abroad since 1789, although it didn’t have the authority to do so until Congress […]

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Yet another chapter in the saga of Arlington National Cemetery has hit the airways. This time it’s concern over the fate of the 9-foot tall decorative marble urns that for decades flanked the stage of Arlington’s Memorial Amphitheater. The urns, now owned by an antiques dealer, will be put up for sale at the Potomack […]

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The following information was posted on the findmypast.co.uk blog today January 20, 2011. It’s a reminder of what was added in 2010 and what’s planned for 2011: “ What’s planned for 2011 on findmypast.co.uk?

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With so many family genealogists out there diligently finding tons of important information, many of us unwittingly place our valuable findings at risk and lose our hard work to hard drive crashes, disk death and obsolescence. In the past only royalty kept family records, now everyone can find and store information on their home computer. […]

Continue reading about Beware the Digital Dark Age and some common-sense solutions to safeguarding your data

The following is a Society of Genealogists (UK) notice of an Ancestry.com announcement: “An online archive revealing historic values of London’s famous landmarks is published today for the first time – Ancestry.co.uk Bank of England, Fleet Street and St Paul’s Cathedral found in records Average London property in 1910 valued at just £14,000, compared to […]

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The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Canadian Genealogy Centre is definitely the best place to visit to begin your Canadian family research. Access is free and the website gives clearly points you to where you need to search. I’m sure most of us appreciate websites that manage to provide a wealth of information and yet […]

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The Comité des Sages is a reflection group focused on bringing Europe’s cultural heritage online. They have made a number of recommendations in their report “The New Renaissance” to the European Union (EU) Member States to ramp up their efforts to make the collections held in all their libraries archives and museums available online. The recommendation […]

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