Books

As part of an effort to create a library collection of George Washington’s favorite reading materials, two books belonging to Washington long held at the National Library of Scotland will soon be returned to Mt Vernon. Alex Salmond, the first minister of Scotland, will soon arrive in the United states to return them. The two […]

Continue reading about George Washington gets his books back from Scotland

The DNA Consultants Blog is a great source of inspiration and information and yesterday’s post is an interesting read. Long before the days of DNA testing scientists, Thomas Jefferson and Constantine Rafinesque, demonstrated the genetic similarity between native Americans and Turkic peoples of the Altai region of southern Siberia. I thought the comment at the […]

Continue reading about Native Americans and Turkic people of southern Siberia share common ancestors

The Espresso Book Machine is an interesting piece of technology that produces a finished book in a matter of minutes.  Just recently the Brooklyn Public Library headquarters became one of about 70 locations to have one (bookstores too) where people can watch a book being made. I can imagine for a writer this could be […]

Continue reading about The Espresso Book Machine a device that prints your own books in a matter of minutes

More than 400 Navajos served as top-secret Code Talkers in the military during World War II. At a time when the best cryptographers fell short of the mark, these modest people successfully contrived the most ingenious and successful code in military history and it completely baffled the Japanese. The unbreakable code played a central part […]

Continue reading about Inspiring interview: World War II Navajo Code Talker Chester Nez

The University of St Andrews, founded in 1413, is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English-speaking world. Talented researchers at St Andrews University, have officially launched a new online catalog of books published between the invention of print and the end of the 16th century. The work is the result of over […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s St. Andrews University 10-year treasure hunt leads to world’s first bibliography of the 16th century

Here’s one for the books. The digital book market is gaining so much traction with consumers and the publishing industry that the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) has expanded its relationship with Nielson BookScan to add a best-seller listing in the weekend edition of WSJ. The new charts debuted on October 29 and includes contributed data […]

Continue reading about The Wall Street Journal debuts eBook best-seller list highlights growing market for digital books

As a child I loved A.A. Milne’s Winnie the Pooh especially “The House at Pooh Corner”. I also loved the smell of those books with their shiny paper (I don’t know if this was significant, but I’m okay). Today is Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday and to commemorate his author A. A. Milne, Findmypast.co.uk has […]

Continue reading about AA Milne in Findmypast records on Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday

Sandy on June 20th, 2011

One of the world’s largest collections of historic books, pamphlets and periodicals housed at the British Library at, 96 Euston Road, London, are to be scanned by Google and made available on the Internet in a deal reached with Google. The deal is to scan 250,000 texts dating back to the 18th century will allow […]

Continue reading about British Library makes a deal with Google

Yes, I’m a Barnes & Noble affiliate, but I decided right from the start that I wouldn’t recommend anything unless I thought it was a good product. If you’ve visited SpittalStreet.com before you’ve probably seen my page Books and Nooks where I have a few books and products that I believe are worth recommending. Not […]

Continue reading about NOOK’s new features will take the eReader to a new level

“Bloomsbury Publishing has announced that it has purchased the backlist of The National Archives’ publications and has agreed to co-publish a range of forthcoming titles. The backlist covers the full range of adult trade titles along with academic works. These include the best-selling titles Genealogists’ Internet by Peter Christian and The UFO Files by Dr […]

Continue reading about Bloomsbury Publishing acquires The National Archives’ UK publications list

In response to the tales of suffering from various encampments throughout the Civil War, sixty-five women of Charlotte formed an association of relief and aid called, “The Soldier’s Aid Society of Charlotte”. The meetings were held in a room given by a Mrs. J.H. Carson, and the very industrious women made over three hundred garments […]

Continue reading about Remembering the Women of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, during the Civil War

A group of about 70 books each with 5 to 15 leaves and bound by lead rings, recently discovered,  could be the earliest Christian writing in existence have survived for almost 2,000 years in a Jordanian cave. A flash flood apparently exposed two niches (plugs) inside the cave. One was marked with the Jewish symbol […]

Continue reading about New archaeological find could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity

Sandy on March 23rd, 2011

The University of Glasgow in Scotland has a special project under way to find out why visitors being shown around the Special Collections often comment on the distinctive and evocative aroma of old books. The university is collaborating with a research team based at the University of Strathclyde to investigate what causes these smells. The […]

Continue reading about Heritage Smells! Visitors comment on smelly books

After searching through all the well-known and not so well known databases only to hit a brick wall, we often overlook some very useful resources. With a lot of family history research done online it’s easy to forget about the other resources like books, genealogy magazines, periodicals and gazetteers that are often great sources of […]

Continue reading about Rare books an often overlooked source for family history researchers