Census

Sandy on August 17th, 2012

With the 1940 U.S. census completed on Ancestry.com, you can search through all 134 million people in the census.  Now that this is done, Ancestry is working behind the scenes to make it even better and this includes the input from users of the mammoth database. In a huge effort to make the 1940 U.S. […]

Continue reading about How you can help improve the 1940 U.S. Census content

Having written about British genealogy company brightsolid (poet e.e. cummings would love the use of lower case “b”) a couple of times recently I’m not surprised to be tapping out another post. My last entry was about their sponsorship of the currently active Rootstech conference and their imminent plans to enter the genealogy market here in […]

Continue reading about Brightsolid to launch pay-as-you-go census records site—try the beta version for free

The following is an update from England’s findmypast.com that is guaranteed to reveal a lot of interesting surprises and some humor for family history researchers: “The final, missing column of data from the 1911 census, which details individuals’ infirmities is today released for the very first time at  www.findmypast.co.uk and www.1911census.co.uk, the family history websites which first […]

Continue reading about 1911 census previously hidden infirmities column now available in well-known UK genealogy database

To make sure that Ancestry.com met customer requirements, they asked users what they could do to make their research goals better. Based on the response, they put together a list of 12 improvements Ancestry will implement in 2012 as follows: “1. Announcing the 1940 U.S. Federal Census — the 72-year wait is over! The long-awaited […]

Continue reading about New Year Resolutions from Ancestry with list of improvements for 2012

Sandy on August 18th, 2011

Ancestry.com press release says: “PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April […]

Continue reading about 1940 U.S. Census to be Free on Ancestry.com

Here’s some interesting news from FindMyPast.co.uk about a fundamental change to be made to the way the site is organized. The changes should make it a lot easier for you to find and search the millions of new records being added to their database every month: “Findmypast has grown an awful lot since we last […]

Continue reading about Improving the way historical records are organized at findmypast

Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

I saw this post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and wanted to pass it along his reference to intimate details that people share on Facebook all the while they protest sharing census information: “They may not mind sharing their most intimate details up on Facebook, but the majority of Australians want their census records destroyed for […]

Continue reading about Australians want census forms destroyed

Staff at the ScotlandsPeople center said in a news update that they were excited to find an entry in the 1841 Census for South Uist (an island that lies off the west coast of Scotland) confirming that many people had emigrated from that Island to Cape Breton in Nova Scotia. It’s unusual to find comments […]

Continue reading about Another interesting find in the 1841 Scottish Census

Sandy on July 8th, 2011

FindMyPast.co.au says: “Today sees the world premiere of the final Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (part two). It’s therefore very apt that this should also be the day that findmypast.co.uk discovers a wizard in the 1911 census! John Watkins Holden had been born in Worcester but was lodging at a house in […]

Continue reading about Real-life Harry Potter found in the 1911 census

Sandy on April 5th, 2011

The 1911 Scottish census is available as of today April 5, 2011. The images of the books are in full color and for the first time including particulars of marriage, the number of children born from the marriage, the occupation and nationality of the person listed on the census. People with special needs were enumerated as […]

Continue reading about 1911 Scottish Census is available today!

Here’s a reminder from Scotland’s People on the release of the 1911 Scottish census: “The 1911 census will be available by 11:00 BST on Tuesday 5 April. Images of the enumeration books will be in full colour and for the first time the enumeration includes the particulars of the marriage, the number of children born […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s People to release the 1911 Census on Tuesday, April, 5.

Sandy on March 22nd, 2011

For my readers in the United Kingdom the following offer from Ancestry.com.uk  is offering free access for 24 hours to their English, Welsh and Scottish census collections to commemorate Census Day 2011: “Get ready! To mark Census Day 2011, we’re letting you access all our UK census record indexes, from England, Wales and Scotland, completely FREE, for […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com offers free census access on 27th March

The “72 Year Census Rule” is the length of time that personal information on the U.S census forms is kept private. When completing a census forms, every household typically answers questions that includes personal information that is preferentially private. As a result the United States Government imposed a rule that protects citizens’ right to privacy […]

Continue reading about The U.S. 72-year census rule and the Scottish 100-year census rule