Discovery

Discovery is the British National Archives’ new catalog, which provides a more integrated and functional way to explore the collections. It has been designed to host, search and display the many different databases and datasets being held at the National Archives. There’s a newly updated version of Discovery  available. It is much improved.  The new […]

Continue reading about British National Archives newly updated version of their Discovery system

According to a new Spanish National Research Council report, a concrete structure nearly 10 feet wide and 6.5 feet tall has been unearthed by archaeologists. It is currently thought to have been erected by Julius Caesar’s successor, Augustus, to condemn the assassination of Caesar on March 25, 44 B.C. The structure was found at the […]

Continue reading about Discovery of spot where Julius Caesar was assassinated in the Curia of Pompey

I stay up to date on a much of the current news on Bloomberg and Bloomgerg BusinessWeek. There are actually two headlines this week that are of interest to genealogists and historians. One in particular is this news story for fans of Who Do You Think You Are? who are disappointed over NBCs cancellation of […]

Continue reading about TLC Network in talks with Ancestry.com to pick up Who Do You Think You Are?

A wooden hulled vessel believed to have sunk in an estimated 4000 feet of water about 200 miles off the Northern Gulf Coast shore by ocean researchers who were exploring the depths of the Gulf of Mexico. The shipwreck was laden with artifacts, such as, anchors, navigational instruments, glass bottles, cannons, boxes of muskets and […]

Continue reading about 200 year-old shipwreck found at a depth of 4000 feet in the Gulf of Mexico

Sandy on May 2nd, 2012

Kathryn Rudy, a lecturer in the School of Art History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, has analyzed some 15th and early 16th-century European prayer books. The point of the study was to learn the reading habits of people who lived in medieval times and turned out to be a kind of forensic analysis […]

Continue reading about Dirty books reveal medieval reading habits

The British National Archives is planning the launch of their new website Discovery at the end of June 2012.  Having  found that searching the site and finding cogent information has been a challenge with the old system, this is music to my ‘eyes’. Discovery will replace the current Catalogue site and offers additional features, which […]

Continue reading about British National Archives launch of their new and improved website Discovery

Graduate of the Savannah College of Art and design Gary Daniels has recently announced the discovery of 2000 year old pottery in the state of Georgia. The highly decorated pottery known as Swift Creek Complicated Stamped started around 100 A.D. and continued on for several hundred years. The glyphs were noted as being similar in […]

Continue reading about Large cache of ancient Mayan pottery discovered in Georgia

Here’s a shout-out to 23andMe for not only making their information more interesting for genealogists this past year but also for their interesting research in personal genetics. They have an improved relative finder tool and have made groundbreaking research discoveries, thanks to members contributions in their study of the genetics of Parkinson’s Disease. It will […]

Continue reading about How DNA research company 23andMe helped their customers this past year

Sandy on December 16th, 2011

It’s almost time for the RootsTech again. So, what is RootsTech? It’s a conference for genealogists who meet to find cutting edges solutions and discover the latest technologies to enhance their research experience. On the techies side developers will gain information to produce innovative applications. RootsTech has something for everyone even if you’re a newbie […]

Continue reading about Special discount on early registration for RootsTech 2012

There’s been a lot writing and discussion in the media about Neanderthals recently and it’s probably due to the increased interest in DNA testing for genealogy and Haplogroups. For instance it has now been discovered that people who belong to the R1b group share a common ancestor with Egypt’s Pharoh Tutankhamun (about 1341 BC – 1323 […]

Continue reading about If you have a mental foramen you could be part Neanderthal

Ned Kelly was a famous Irish convict in Australia and, if you’re an Aussie you’ve often heard the expression, “As game as Ned Kelly”. In this context the word “game” means willing to face danger. Kelly was considered to be a “Robin Hood” type folk hero by some for his defiance against the British authorities […]

Continue reading about Body of infamous Aussie outlaw found and identified with DNA test

The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

Continue reading about British National Archives launches new Discovery service

A group of about 70 books each with 5 to 15 leaves and bound by lead rings, recently discovered,  could be the earliest Christian writing in existence have survived for almost 2,000 years in a Jordanian cave. A flash flood apparently exposed two niches (plugs) inside the cave. One was marked with the Jewish symbol […]

Continue reading about New archaeological find could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity