Family History

Sandy on September 12th, 2011

If you’ve been gathering your family history records over the years you will by now recognize the importance of records preservation. With this problem in mind, I suggest that you read a paper written by Gary T. Wright which is available on the FamilySearch.org website. It’s excellent and answers some of my own questions. Since […]

Continue reading about Preserving your family history records digitally

Sandy on September 12th, 2011

When I recently discovered a couple of misspellings in my family tree (this happens a lot), I’ve had more than a couple of anxious moments wondering if I managed to change them all.  The following post by Tana Pederson on the ancestry.com blog is a very simple a useful way to remedy the situation with […]

Continue reading about Family Tree Maker: Find and Replace Tool

Sandy on September 12th, 2011

The following is a news flash from Deceased Online:  “Deceased Online has a large stand at the Scottish Association of Family History Societies (SAFHS) annual conference, Adam House, Chambers Street, Edinburgh. You can meet some of our dedicated Scottish team on 25th June where we’ll be unveiling 400,000 Scottish burial and cremation records new to […]

Continue reading about 400,000 more Scottish records from Deceased Online

Sandy on September 10th, 2011

It’s not only journalism students who are taught to answer those, who, what, when, where, why, and how, questions used when analyzing the fruits of our research.  These questions can be applied to most subjects and certainly includes the evidence obtained from your genealogical sources. And, while it’s true in all instances that evidence varies […]

Continue reading about Questions to ask when analyzing your genealogical evidence

Sandy on September 7th, 2011

Another reminder from the National Genealogical Society (NGS): “This is such an exciting project for genealogists that we want to remind you about it. As the War of 1812 pensions are being digitized (see previous posts below and check out this FGS page) they are freely available to all at the Fold3 (previously Footnote) website. Currently about 69,000 […]

Continue reading about War of 1812 pensions freely available at Fold3

The following is an informational announcement from the National Genealogical Society (NGS) about a new project funded project by The National Endowment for the Humanities: “The National Endowment for the Humanities has funded the project, “Biographies: The Atlantic Slaves Data Network” (ASDN). The ASDN will provide a platform for researchers of African slaves in the […]

Continue reading about National Endowment for the Humanities new project: “Biographies: The Atlantic Slaves Data Network”

Ned Kelly was a famous Irish convict in Australia and, if you’re an Aussie you’ve often heard the expression, “As game as Ned Kelly”. In this context the word “game” means willing to face danger. Kelly was considered to be a “Robin Hood” type folk hero by some for his defiance against the British authorities […]

Continue reading about Body of infamous Aussie outlaw found and identified with DNA test

“For immediate release  AYE AYE CAPTAIN – MERCHANT NAVY ARCHIVES REVEAL PHOTOS OF UK’S FORGOTTEN ‘FOURTH SERVICE’ Churchill’s ‘fourth service’ who helped to make Britain ‘Great’ Fascinating photos of British merchant mariners from 100 years ago A ‘floating United Nations’, women and men, young boys, ‘donkeymen’ and manicurists, as well as personal descriptions such as […]

Continue reading about 1 million Merchant Navy Seamen records published by findmypast today – many include photos!

Most of us have used Wikipedia, “the world’s largest and most popular encyclopedia” as a launching pad for research on every subject under the sun. Much to my surprise, I discovered that Wikipedia is part of a much larger organization called Wikimedia. So, what is Wikimedia? “The Wikimedia Foundation,  Inc. is a nonprofit charitable organization […]

Continue reading about Wikimedia resources plus new links to NARA’s online catalog

Sandy on August 31st, 2011

FamilySearch.org has added the following records to it’s enormous database: “Austria, Mexico, Peru, U.S. Each Add Over a Million Records FamilySearch.org added over six million records to its free online database this week. The new collections include seigniorial records from Austria; civil registrations from Chihuahua, Mexico; and probate records from Kentucky, U.S. Also added this week […]

Continue reading about FamilySearch Adds 6 Million Records

On 16 April 1746, about 6 miles from Inverness, Scotland, the  Battle of Culloden Moor was fought. This  was the last battle fought on Scottish soil and was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite (Jacobus is Latin for James) rebellion led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie), against the English Duke of […]

Continue reading about The Battle of Culloden Moor 1746: The last battle ever to be fought on Scottish soil

Sandy on August 30th, 2011

Alan Stewart of Grow Your Own Family Tree publishes a lot of great information on his blog  and the latest is as follows: “TheGenealogist.co.uk has now added a large collection of new Australian records to its Diamond Premium subscription. The records add convict lists, census, general musters, ledger returns and the First Fleet, which was the name given […]

Continue reading about New Australian records online at TheGeneologist

In addition to the Facebook contest information in my recent post, I’m adding the following press release from Ancestry.com for additional information: “Enhanced Collection also Features Celebrity Yearbook Photo Gallery of Today’s Stars before They Became Famous PROVO, UTAH – August 24, 2011 – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family historyresource, today announced a massive expansion […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com Expands U.S. School Yearbook Collection To Include More Than 150 Million Records of Relative’s School Days

If you’re lucky enough to have visited the Smithsonian Museum you’ll already know it’s always free. Here’s an wonderful event sponsored by the Smithsonian for free admission to an impressive list of museums throughout the country. All you need to do is to complete an online form and then select the museum you’d like to […]

Continue reading about Museum Day Free Admission at museums across the country Sept. 24

Sandy on August 25th, 2011

I read a disturbing post on the DNA Consultants blog about a lady called Marcy who had a bad experience with a DNA company who manipulated her test results and likely those of other clients. After reading Marcy’s story, I do agree  when questions arise from the  results of a DNA test that vendors, even […]

Continue reading about Rigged genetics! Say it ain’t so

Here’s the latest sweepstakes information from Ancestry.com: “Ancestry.com has just announced a massive expansion of the world’s most extensive searchable collection of U.S. school yearbooks available online. It now totals over 35,000 and carries 155 million records encompassing the years 1884 to 2009. The U.S. Yearbook Collection includes close to seven million images from thousands […]

Continue reading about U.S. Yearbooks Collection Gets Major Upgrade/New Photo Sweepstakes on Facebook

The following is the latest announcement from FamilySearch.org:  “Because of what we learned from your feedback in the Record Search Pilot, several features that were part of the pilot test will be carried over into the next release of FamilySearch. Some of these features will be available right away, while others may take several months […]

Continue reading about Search feature changes in upcoming releases of FamilySearch.org

The following is the most up-to-date information about digital convict records to be published by the UK National Archives. The records are to be transcribed, digitized and published online by Brightsolid. There’s a link to the Brightsolid website which were you can read some interesting facts about the company:  “The National Archives’ crime, courts and […]

Continue reading about Three million crime, court and convict records to be digitized by UK National Archives

Here’s some interesting news from FindMyPast.co.uk about a fundamental change to be made to the way the site is organized. The changes should make it a lot easier for you to find and search the millions of new records being added to their database every month: “Findmypast has grown an awful lot since we last […]

Continue reading about Improving the way historical records are organized at findmypast

At the beginning of the 19th century the Industrial Revolution had a strong foothold in the Scottish city of Glasgow with the manufacture of cotton and textiles, chemicals, glass, paper and soap. People from the Highlands in the north moved to the area in the 1820s and, later in the 1840s, immigrants arrived from Ireland […]

Continue reading about Victorian Glasgow, Scotland, the “Second City of the Empire”

Sandy on August 11th, 2011

A free webinar has been announced by Legacy Family Tree on Monday, August 15, 2011, at 2:00 p.m. ET. I’ve attended these webinars in the past and have always learned something. I’ve signed up to attend and decided to pass the following notice along to the readers of SpittalStreet: Google+ the Next Big Thing a free […]

Continue reading about Google+ the Next Big Thing

Sandy on August 8th, 2011

From the UK National Archives: “To celebrate the centenary of the 1911 census, The National Archives is holding a one-day conference, Celebrating the Census, on 1 October. Places are limited and are available on a first come first served basis, so book early to guarantee your place. You could also win two tickets for the conference […]

Continue reading about Celebrate the centennial of the UK 1911 census

Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

FamilySearch.org says: “Records of the Swedish American Churches are a great source for genealogical information and especially for helping to establish the place of origin in Sweden. Many of the Swedish-American church records kept in American are of the same high quality found as the records of Sweden. Sweden had a State Church (1527 to […]

Continue reading about Swedish-American:Church Records

Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

Continue reading about UK National Archives launches new library catalog

Amy Sell of Findmypast.co.uk has released the following records: “WOMEN IN BUSINESS CELEBRATED IN NEWLY RELEASED RECORDS Fascinating Business Indexes released online Banned female author Radclyffe Hall of contentious novel The Well of Loneliness listed Celebrated British companies Cadburys, Barclays, Rolls Royce, Lyons, and Harrods all included Set against the backdrop of the early twentieth century, […]

Continue reading about Women in business celebrated in newly released records

Sandy on July 14th, 2011

According to Richard Hill’s post on his DNA Testing Adviser web site: “DNA Heritage ceased operations in April 2011 and transferred existing customer results to Family Tree DNA. FTDNA has now announced the conversion program. The Y-DNA conversion to the basic 25-marker level is free. Existing DNA Heritage customers should click the link below and opt […]

Continue reading about DNA Heritage to FTDNA Conversion

Sandy on July 14th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Findmypast.co.uk: “We are very proud to announce the launch of four sets of nineteenth and twentieth century military records to help enrich your family history. The records provide useful detail including attestation and leaving dates, achievements made in service and soldiers’ physical appearence. And, certainly in the case of the […]

Continue reading about Rich new military records launched by Findmypast

As a reminder, iOS is Apple’s mobile operating system originally developed for the iPhone it has been developed to support other Apple devices such as iPad, iPod touch and Apple TV. It’s not available for Android. That said, this blog post is about the latest App for iOS the Wolfram Genealogy and History Research Assistant […]

Continue reading about Wolfram Genealogy & History Research Assistant App for iOS

According to an article in the Guysborough Journal  the Guysborough Historical Society (GHS) has opened a new research center in thebasement of the Old Courthouse Museum. It’s available for use by visitors and locals for genealogical research. Easy and safe access to museum archives, books and records is available year-round. The GHS also hopes that […]

Continue reading about Old Court House Museum in Nova Scotia opens research center

Sandy on July 11th, 2011

On June 29, I blogged about Google+ challenges to Facebook in the realm of social networking and, as an old IT person I check to see what’s new in technology on a regular basis not only for my own benefit, but also to share technology  on SpittalStreet that might be of use to genealogists. According […]

Continue reading about 9 Reasons to Switch from Facebook to Google+

Sandy on July 8th, 2011

FindMyPast.co.au says: “Today sees the world premiere of the final Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (part two). It’s therefore very apt that this should also be the day that findmypast.co.uk discovers a wizard in the 1911 census! John Watkins Holden had been born in Worcester but was lodging at a house in […]

Continue reading about Real-life Harry Potter found in the 1911 census

Sandy on July 8th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “If you haven’t visited FamilyTreeMaker.com recently, it’s time to take another look. Recently, Family Tree Maker launched its newly redesigned website with simplified navigation and more features to help you find answers to your questions. Here are a few highlights: A tour of the software shows some of the key features and tools available in […]

Continue reading about FamilyTreeMaker.com Gets a New Look

The Japanese samurai warriors were members of the military class of pre-industrial Japan. By the end of the 12th century, the word samurai became almost synonymous with Bushido (the way of the warrior), the word was closely associated with the middle and upper echelons of the warrior class. Samurai used a wide range of weapons, […]

Continue reading about How to get started on your Samurai ancestry and Japanese ancestral research

The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

Continue reading about British National Archives launches new Discovery service

Sandy on July 6th, 2011

MyHeritige.com has posted information today about a new offering called Family Goals which permits families to split the bill on Premium and PremiumPlus subscriptions. This enables family members to chip in to cover the costs thus making family history research more affordable and, at the same time, encourage the wider family to become more connected […]

Continue reading about My Heritage introduces new family subscription

When you make the decision to research your family tree you may want to ponder a while before you proceed, just to make sure that you’ll be able to accept what you uncover. People normally share stories about the good things of life or sad stories with happy endings, leaving out the shocking realities that […]

Continue reading about Warning! Unraveling a family tree may not be what you expect

Sandy on June 29th, 2011

Grow Your Own Family Tree says: “One of the most comprehensive records of the Irish 1916 Easter Rising has been released in a fully searchable structured index for the first time. The Sinn Féin Rebellion Handbook was published by the Irish Times in 1917 and provides a fascinating insight into one of the most important […]

Continue reading about Irish 1916 Easter Rising information goes online

If you’ve been searching for an ancestor in the right place only to discover that you were looking in the wrong county, The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries could prove to be a great help. How often have you searched for an ancestor only to discover that although you were searching in the right place […]

Continue reading about Atlas of Historical County Boundaries-another great find

Up until a couple of years ago, the basic operations of our libraries hadn’t changed much since philanthropists like Andrew Carnegie donated more than $40,000,000 to build about 1,700 libraries in communities throughout the country. Now, the very existence of our libraries is threatened. Like many businesses, libraries all over the country—if they haven’t been […]

Continue reading about What’s happening to public libraries in the face of new technology and budget cutbacks?

Sandy on June 27th, 2011

The following post appeared on the Family Search blog. The FamilySearch.org website provides a continuing learning experience in genealogy and it’s free: “Those of Irish ancestry are well aware of Ireland’s turbulent, troubled history and costly fight for independence. Adding to Ireland’s painful saga was the bloody Irish Civil War fought between1922-1923. One of the […]

Continue reading about Irish Probate Records

I’ve just finished reading an amazing article in the Monterey County Weekly about a dedicated family historian’s 21-year quest to uncover his ancestors. His story starts out like many others, using the same popular resources that most of us are familiar with, but the results are astounding. Gary Carlsen was cleaning his attic in 1990 […]

Continue reading about Family Historian’s research reveals 18,000 direct and in-law relatives dating back to 1847

Sandy on June 24th, 2011

Findmypast.co.uk has just released a huge index and images of  WO96 militia records for 1806-1915. The records are a valuable resource for genealogy research.  See below: “We’ve just published over half a million Militia Service Records, covering 1806 to 1915, in association with The National Archives and in partnership with FamilySearch. This is the first time these records […]

Continue reading about Britain’s everyday military heroes!

Sandy on June 24th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Ancestry.com “There is nothing like meeting and connecting with fellow genealogists. So mark your calendar and join Ancestry.com at the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Washington, DC, August 14-19. This is the 31st year that IAJGS (International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies) has hosted this conference and we’re […]

Continue reading about Join Ancestry.com at the IAJGS Conference in August

Sandy on June 23rd, 2011

The East India Company was created as a Royal Charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I (1533 – 1603) . It has been said that without it the world would not be the same today. It changed the world’s tastes, it’s thinking and it’s people by creating new communities, trading places, and shaped countries and established […]

Continue reading about Online research for Indian genealogical records

Sandy on June 22nd, 2011

FindMyPast.co.uk says: “Adding to our British Army Service Records 1760-1915 collection, we have just published over 500,000 soliders’ records in our Militia service records 1806-1915. These records offer a rich source of information to the family historian, especially because attestation papers form a major part of this collection. Attestation refers to the papers drawn up upon […]

Continue reading about New Militia records launched

“The Brooklyn Historical Society’s four-story Queen Anne style building was completed in 1881 and was designed by architect George B. Post. Post’s bold use of extensive terra cotta ornamentation on the façade, and innovative truss system to support the ceiling of the central library, has long been revered by architectural historians.” Plans for interior renovations […]

Continue reading about Brooklyn Historical Society’s modern update renovation plans unveiled

If, like me, you’ve been researching on FamilySearch.org for several years and have been accustomed to finding things on the old site and are struggling with the new interface, you’ll be happy to know that you can now search for historical records using batch numbers from the International Genealogical Index (IGI). What’s a Batch Number? […]

Continue reading about New International Genealogical Index batch number search feature

Ian Tester of findmypast says: “Hello – I’m Ian Tester, the Product Manager for findmypast, and I wanted to let you know about a neat little project we’re in the middle of to make your experience of searching records a little better. You may have noticed recently that small blue stars have started appearing next […]

Continue reading about Saving your records – what’s new, what’s coming at Findmypast

The DNA test results for a family member have just come in and we’re amazed at the results. A few years ago, although I’d never considered it, I would have been wary of taking a DNA test. Because of the convincing security measures taken by the well-known testing services, there is probably more danger lurking […]

Continue reading about Autosomal DNA testing could break down those genealogical brick walls

Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

On the first Friday of June each year, National Doughnut Day is celebrated by the Salvation Army who created it in 1938 to honor the women who served donuts to soldiers during World War I. Many doughnut stores in the United States offer free doughnuts on National Doughnut Day. In 2009, small doughnut vendors as […]

Continue reading about National Doughnut Day

Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

As of Monday, June 6th, when you make copies in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) research rooms in the Washington, area they will be printed on Windsor Blue paper. This is being done to help delineate which papers were copied on NARA equipment or printed at one of the public use PC printers […]

Continue reading about Why so blue?

Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

Last year’s New Zealand Family History Fair was a great success and over 1000 visitors enjoyed the event that included free access to Ancestry.com, Findmypast, The Genealogist, Footnote, My Heritage, World Vital Records, and FamilyRelatives. Quite a lineup. This year’s fair schedule to take place 26 – 27 August, at Claudelands Events Centre in Hamilton […]

Continue reading about New Zealand’s Family History Fair 2011

Paula Hinkel, Director, Vice President at Southern California Genealogical Society. Co-Chair, Southern California Genealogy Jamboree has posted the following message on LinkedIn: “This is the last call for Jamboree pre-registration, which closes 11:59 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, June 1. This email will list links to all of the Jamboree activities in the SCGS online shopping cart. […]

Continue reading about Last call for pre-registration – Southern California Genealogy Jambore

Sandy on June 2nd, 2011

The following is a news release from Generation Maps now renamed Family ChartMasters: “Cedar Hills, Utah. — June 1st, 2011 — Generation Maps, the leading genealogy chart printing service, announces today that it is changing its name to Family ChartMasters. “We’ve decided to rename in order to simplify and focus our message on exactly what […]

Continue reading about Generation Maps becomes Family ChartMasters

Wow! my Google alert request actually provided me with current information. The National Library of Scotland (NLS) has invited people to have their say on their Gaelic Language Plan. When I was young, Scottish Gaelic was considered a dead language with only a few people still using it in the west highlands and islands. Although […]

Continue reading about Have your say on National Library of Scotland Gaelic Language Plan

Many genealogists and family historians are, like me, members of the professional social network LinkedIn. If you are, you’ll be disappointed to learn that LinkedIn is just one more major website with a serious security flaw that enables a hijacker to access user account without needing a password. It’s vulnerability is directly tied to the […]

Continue reading about A LinkedIn cookie flaw lets attackers hijack your login

In the Fall (Autumn) of 2011, The British Newspaper Archive will digitize millions of pages of newspapers making them available online. The British Libraries newspaper collection is probably the best in the world and the collection will contain most of the runs of newspapers published in the UK since 1800. This could prove to be […]

Continue reading about The British Newspaper Archive: More than one million pages of British historical newspapers are to be published online

As reported in a Boston Phoenix article, Google informed its partners that its News Archive project would stop accepting, scanning and indexing microfilm and other archival material from newspapers. Google has instead decided to focus its energies on “newer projects that help the industry, such as Google One Pass, a platform that enables publishers to […]

Continue reading about Google abandons master-plan to archive the world’s newspapers

With the advent of the amazing and increasingly useful online genealogical resources, family historians have come to realize how important it is to keep up with the latest in technology. It’s with this in mind that I’m posting this very interesting news release from Ancestry.com: “PROVO, Utah, May 18, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com Inc. […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com to Present at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch 2011 Technology Conference

Sandy on May 19th, 2011

Family Historians are usually faced with the problem of preserving old photographs. Families old photograph’s, Family Tree University is offering a free 30-minute Photo Detective Live! webinar. The presentation is also available for download. Here’s the link: Watch the webinar and download the slides on FamilyTreeUniversity.com.  

Continue reading about FREE Photo Detective Live! Webinar

Findmypast.co.uk has a new and improved death records search–see below: “Easily find records of your ancestors’ deaths using findmypast.co.uk’s powerful new death records search Following the transformation of our births and marriages, we have revolutionised how you search for your ancestors’ death records. When you search, you will be presented with a list of individual names – […]

Continue reading about New and improved death records search at Findmypast

Sandy on May 18th, 2011

This following terrific Ancestry.com feature was posted yesterday by Stephanie Cruz who focus is on features that help you find and reach out to other members who share your family history research: “Did you know that you can share your member tree with friends and family for free? Send them an email invitation and they can […]

Continue reading about Share your Tree with Friends and Family

The National Archives Science Working Group has just released a publication developed with a team of archivists, records managers, data managers and scientists in Federal agencies is designed to help Federal agency CIOs, IT program staff and records officers understand what procedures are in place now and what policies and process procedures need to be […]

Continue reading about NARA discussion guide on establishing trustworthy digital repositories

I’d like to point you to a website called African Origins. It contains information about the migration history of Africans who were forcibly carried on slave ships. This important site will bring to light the history of millions of Africans captured and sold into slavery during suppression of the transatlantic slave trade during the 19th century. […]

Continue reading about African Origins website traces the origins of enslaved Africans

On May 5, NARA and five national and international research organizations met in Washington DC to launch a new international research portal for records related to Nazi-era cultural properties. The purpose of the project is to extend public access to the records through a single internet portal. This includes access to descriptions and digitized copies […]

Continue reading about Global catalogue of Nazi-looted art records published online for family researchers and historians