Family History

blog.findmypast.co.uk  says: “Findmypast.co.uk has always had the most comprehensive England & Wales birth and marriage records – now we’ve added our exclusive additional records to create one simple search. As well as England & Wales records, you can now search for your British ancestors’ births and marriages in our overseas, military and at sea records, some […]

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The World Memory Project was created by The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com, to allow the public free online access to records so that families and victims of the  can discover what happened to their loved ones as a result of one of the worst events in the history of the world. This […]

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Sandy on April 29th, 2011

Dutch explorers found Australia in the early 1600s, but decided against settling because the land was too dry and inhospitable. After losing the American colonies the British were anxious to find another place to ship convicts and established the state of New South Wales as a penal colony. In 1788, nine ships of convicts along […]

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The most recent posting on the FGS blog is the following announcement of two new appointments to the Board–Congratulations to Thomas MacEntee and Randy Whited: “For Immediate Release April 22, 2011 FEDERATION OF GENEALOGICAL SOCIETIES BOARD APPOINTMENTS Thomas MacEntee and Randy Whited Named Directors April 22, 2011 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) […]

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Sandy on April 18th, 2011

When I left Scotland one of the items I missed was the “Water Biscuit”. When I asked people in New York where I could find them they’d actually never heard of them. Shortly after I got married I went to visit my mother-in -law who was, when I arrived at her home in Brooklyn, enjoying […]

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I’ve just found a terrific website called Connected Histories I’d like to share that brings together 11 major digital resources related to early modern and nineteenth century Britain (1500-1900), with a single search that allows the sophisticated searching of names places and dates, and the ability to save, connect and even share resources within your […]

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I never forget that I owe my knowledge of and acquaintance with my ancestors for the most part to FamilySearch.org.  And, I still believe that their organization is the best place for beginners to start their search and learn how it all works. I’d like to remind you of their wonderful free classes and vast […]

Continue reading about Family Search adds 14 Million New Records from Belgium, Canada, Chile, England, Netherlands, Slovakia, South Africa, and the U.S.

Sandy on April 4th, 2011

I might be a wee bit biased here because I’m Scottish born and spent my formative years in Scotland in an area steeped in history. When I lived in New York I actually met very few Scots, but now that I’ve moved south they’re everywhere. And, because I’m a family history enthusiast, I see Scottish […]

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Here’s a copy of a post on the Ancestry.com blog written by Tana L. Pedersen (Family Tree Maker expert) that answered a question of my own, so and I’m passing it along because it may answer yours. “Last month when I announced the February webinar for Family Tree Maker, hundreds of you posted questions for our […]

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After searching through all the well-known and not so well known databases only to hit a brick wall, we often overlook some very useful resources. With a lot of family history research done online it’s easy to forget about the other resources like books, genealogy magazines, periodicals and gazetteers that are often great sources of […]

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“Nearly 37 Million Americans Claim Irish Ancestry including President Obama and Walt Disney PROVO, UTAH (March 14, 2011) – In recognition of St. Patrick’s Day, Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today launchedThe Irish Collection – the definitive 19thcentury collection of Irish historical records. The collection provides nearly 100 years of insight into life […]

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Sandy on March 3rd, 2011

I’m a big fan of Thomas MacEntee of Geneabloggers and was able to attend the RootsTech 2011 “Virtual Presentations Roundtable” (via desktop conference) moderated by Thomas. It was a very interesting experience. I’ve taken the liberty of posting the following information from Genealbloggers and can recommend setting aside some time to view them. The following […]

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Findmypast.co.uk keeps getting better and is a force to be reckoned with the the world of genealogy databases. I’ve found plenty of data on my ancestors that I haven’t found elsewhere. Here’s the latest news from this competitive group: “Findmypast.co.uk and the British Library are working together on an exciting project to digitise a treasure […]

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Sandy on February 24th, 2011

If you’re an Ancestry.com member you’ll be interested to see the following  financial results published today: “PROVO, Utah, Feb. 24, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today reported financial results for the quarter and full year ended December 31, 2010. “2010 was a productive and very successful […]

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Welcome to the dark side of social networking. This certainly includes genealogists and family historians. Cybercriminals, virus writers and others, always go were the numbers are and that translates big time to social media sites.  About 175 million people rely on social media for multiple reasons and  I can understand why the many warnings issued […]

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The Knights Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem, founded in 1080, is the oldest Order of Chivalry in existence. It’s also is also the third oldest religious Order in Christendom and the only remaining offshoot of the period in history known as the Crusades. The Order that never numbered more than a few thousand […]

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Sandy on February 13th, 2011

If you missed Episode 2 of “Who Do You Think You Are?” country music star Tim McGraw’s search for his roots, click on the link. It was a terrific show. The country music superstar uncovers his father’s heritage among the Founding Fathers. I’m sure it was a cathartic experience for him—It usually is.

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Registration is now open for the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society and the Canadian Department of North York Central Library Scottish history workshop.  The program looks like a fascinating featuring three speakers James F.S. Thomson, Chris Paton, and Marian Press. The when and Where: Saturday, June 18, 2011 North York Central Library Auditorium […]

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The “72 Year Census Rule” is the length of time that personal information on the U.S census forms is kept private. When completing a census forms, every household typically answers questions that includes personal information that is preferentially private. As a result the United States Government imposed a rule that protects citizens’ right to privacy […]

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The following announcement was written by FamilySearch: “SALT LAKE CITY—RootsTech, a new family history and technology conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 10-12, 2011, announced today that six of its popular sessions will be broadcasted live and complimentary over the Internet. The live broadcasts will give those unable to attend worldwide a sample […]

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It looks as though there is a solution to the cliff-hanger caused by the departure of the Ancestry.com Expert Connect service. Genealogy Freelancers.com is welcoming many of those affected by the situation to transition to their service. The company was established in 2008 and offers a project bidding system, which is an easy transition for […]

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The FamilySearch indexing project started in 2006, when FamilySearch moved its CD-ROM based content to the web. This is an ongoing  mammoth effort and, in spite of all the criticism regarding the database, I’m impressed. Database development is difficult and I can tell you from experience that a new systems implementation is not easy. I’ve […]

Continue reading about Wow! FamilySearch Volunteers Have Indexed Over 500 Million Records

Since 1976, Black History Month has been celebrated annually in the United States of America during the month of February and the United Kingdom in the month of October. In the U.S.  Black History Month is also called African-American History Month. In honor of Black History Month, Ancestry.com has launched more than 250,000 new records […]

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Ancestry.com has announced that they have a new iPad app called Ancestry. It’s built specifically for the tablet and shows complete images of family records and photos. It’s  also a highly interactive and visual tool for users to share their trees with family and friends. A huge part of the 21st century that our ancestors […]

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As a current member of findmypast.com, I’m always happy to pass along any information that will help make a worthwhile project successful: “The Federation of Family History Societies is carrying out a new and exciting transcription project to help trace missing ancestors, in partnership with findmypast.co.uk: the Lost Ancestors project. The FFHS would like to […]

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Ancestry.com will once again be partnering with NBC to help celebrities discover their family histories in Season 2 of “Who Do You Think You Are?”, premiering on Friday, February 4. Viewers can take an up-close and personal look inside the family history of some of today’s most beloved and iconic celebrities including, Gwyneth Paltrow, Tim […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com “The Ultimate Family Journey Sweepstakes” with grand prize of $20,000 in travel money

“In the Middle Ages, the study of the measure of time was first viewed as prying too deeply into God’s own affairs – and later thought of as a lowly, mechanical study, unworthy of serious contemplation.” The calendar we use today is the Gregorian Calendar, first introduced by Pope Gregory XIII in a papal bull […]

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The following is a notice from the UK Society of Genealogists regarding the “Who Do You Think You Are? Live National History Show” in Olympia, London, sponsored by Ancestry.com.uk: “The Society of Genealogists Family History Show will again take place as part of the Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE National History Show – 25-27 […]

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I wanted to write about the Fortingall Yew, not only because some of my ancestors at one time lived and worked the area, but also because people have asked about it. It’s one of eight pictures that rotate on my blog and each time you visit SpittalStreet.com, or click on another page in the blog, […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s Fortingall Yew is 2000–5000 years old is the oldest tree in Europe

If you’ve been using FindMyPast for your genealogical research during the past couple of years, you’ll find that they have become a real competitor when it comes to helping people to find their ancestors ancestors in their database. Here’s a copy of their latest blog announcement: “You can now search 126,967 new parish baptism and […]

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Sandy on January 7th, 2011

Technology has radically transformed world communication during the last few years and consequently the changes in the rapidly expanding field of genealogy are also radical. For most people the changes at the personal level are significant since it’s now much easier and faster to document family histories using online databases that only a short while […]

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The following is the Society of Genealogists UK announcement on publishing over 9 million records at findmypast.com.uk: “Today the Society of Genealogists in London and leading family history website findmypast.co.uk have published online over 9 million records from the Society’s unrivalled collection at findmypast.co.uk.

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