Genealogy

Sandy on October 15th, 2011

If you’re leery of downloading toolbars this one isn’t an advertisement. Tami  Glatz has created and shared  a  toolbar on LinkedIn that works with all browsers and its FREE. It’s all handy links for online genealogy researchers! Tami’s constantly adding more great sites – most  are free.  I’ve downloaded it myself and can assure you […]

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As a child I loved A.A. Milne’s Winnie the Pooh especially “The House at Pooh Corner”. I also loved the smell of those books with their shiny paper (I don’t know if this was significant, but I’m okay). Today is Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday and to commemorate his author A. A. Milne, Findmypast.co.uk has […]

Continue reading about AA Milne in Findmypast records on Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday

Sandy on October 14th, 2011

“You can now search 10,529 records of WWII Escapers & Evaders on findmypast.co.uk These records are individual reports for allied service personnel about their experiences of escaping from prisoner of war camps or evading capture in Central Europe throughout WWII. Each entry will tell you the following key information about your ancestor: name, rank, number, […]

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Sandy on October 14th, 2011

UK family history site Genes Reunited have added the following Parish records to their growing record collection: “ Today sees the launch of over 35 million baptism, marriage and burial records for England and Wales dating back to 1538. Parish records are an important source for family historians allowing them to trace their ancestors back further […]

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Here’s the latest from Deceased Online: “After conducting research and finding the cemetery, churchyard or burial ground where an ancestor is buried, many family historians are frustrated that they cannot find the plot or even a rough location for their ancestor’s last resting place. And on a cold, wet Tuesday afternoon in February there is […]

Continue reading about Maps of cemeteries and burial grounds in Angus, Scotland

The most heard greeting for the Jewish New Year season is “May your name be inscribed in the Book of Life”. Today at sundown, is the beginning of the Day of Atonement, also known as Yom Kippur (יוֹם כִּפּוּר or יום הכיפורים.)  It’s the holiest and most solemn day of the year for the Jews and […]

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Sandy on October 7th, 2011

Findmypast UK says: “We have just published more than 730,000 new Berkshire parish records on findmypast.co.uk These new records will be a great help to anyone trying to trace their Berkshire ancestors. Berkshire Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records. Further details of this release are as follows: Type of records Number of records Date range […]

Continue reading about New Berkshire parish records on findmypast.co.uk

Personal Historian 2 is finally launched. The press release is as follows: “SPRINGVILLE, Utah. — September 28, 2011 — RootsMagic, Inc. today announced the official release of Personal Historian 2, the latest version of the ground-breaking computer software which helps you write the story of your life and of other individuals.  Personal Historian breaks this seemingly […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Here’s some information from Ancestry.com about today’s release of Family Tree Maker 2012, which provides you with a description of the improvements made in this latest upgrade. If you’d like to purchase it,  you can click on the graphic above and it’ll take you to where you need to go… “Ancestry.com announced the release of […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “This week was a happy dance week for those of us with Irish roots.  Ancestry.com has posted indexes to Irish Civil Registrations which began in 1864 for births,  marriages, and deaths (1845 for non-Catholic marriages). In addition there is an index to births and baptisms that dates back to 1620, extracted from a variety of records. Three other collections that […]

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Three months after the largest wildfire ever recorded on New Mexico state records, the National Parks Service (NPS) has reopened sections of the Bandelier National Monument to visitors. “The fire which began on June 26, burned over 60% of the park and altered much of the park landscape.” The visitor center, which contained the largest […]

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The following information is the latest from the Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) with thanks to Dick Eastman’s EOGN blog for pointing this one out: “Today, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) commemorates the 170th anniversary of the Canada Gazette by making accessible the digitized back issues, from 1841 to 1997, on its website dedicated to this […]

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Here’s the latest release of records from Findmypast.co.uk: “MANCHESTER ‘BAD BOYS’ REVEALED IN CITY ARCHIVE RECORDS RELEASED ONLINE Manchester prison and workhouse records included Charges include: indecent relations with a pig, and driving a contagious cow along a highway Victorian law and order likely to have punished today’s rioters more severely First execution listed at […]

Continue reading about Findmypast.co.uk publishes 1.3 million Manchester family history records, including prison and school registers

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) has recently launched a beautiful website dedicated to Native American ancestry titled Trace Indian Ancestry offering helpful tips and information on researching the genealogy of your Native American ancestors: “To determine if you are eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, contact the tribe, or tribes, you […]

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The National Library of Ireland is investigating a situation regarding a cache of more than 400,000 records released by a UK genealogy company infringes on its legal rights to the microfilms behind the records. Ancestry.com.uk published more than 40 million Irish birth, marriage and death records. According to the Irish Times, the files consist of […]

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Sandy on September 23rd, 2011

Slot canyons can be found in many parts of the world, mainly in areas with low rainfall. Some of the most well-known slot canyons can be found in the Southwestern United States, in the Pyrenees bordering France and Spain, the Sierra de Guara in northern Spain and, as headlined in this post, in the Blue […]

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Sandy on September 22nd, 2011

Most of us realize that the Internet has changed family history research and a recent article in Desert News online describes how the next five years will accelerate the process making it more affordable and rewarding. The article “Family history in the future” was written by Paul Allen the famed co-founder and CEO of Ancestry.com […]

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Sandy on September 21st, 2011

The great Nez Perce leader known to non-Indians as Chief Joseph died on the Colville reservation in northern Washington on September 21, 1904. Nez Perce Him-mah-too yah-lat-kekt (“Thunder Rolling Down from the Mountains”) has been described by Europeans as a superhuman military genius and an Indian Napoleon, but he was actually more of a diplomat […]

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FamilySearch.org says: “FamilySearch.org added millions of new records this week including 11 new records collections. More than six million Hungary Catholic Church records were added, as well as four million Mexico civil registration records. Looking for records from China? Over a million new Chinese genealogies from 1500–1900 are now available for viewing. Begin searching for free at FamilySearch.org. Searchable records on FamilySearch.org are […]

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Wade Mainer a singer and banjo pioneer whose definitive style and devotion to old-time mountain songs made him a pivotal figure in the transition to bluegrass music, died of congestive heart failure on Monday September 12, 2011, at the age of 104 in his home in Flint, Michigan. After joining his older brother at a […]

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I recently posted an article titled “The Battle of Culloden Moor 1746: The last battle ever to be fought on Scottish soil”  the last battle of the 1745 Jacobite rebellion in Scotland. I was intrigued to learn that the Royal Bank of Scotland Group is making history in 140 characters by using Twitter that will certainly […]

Continue reading about Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) finds a unique way to bring the 1745 Jacobite rebellion to life.

Sandy on September 12th, 2011

If you’ve been gathering your family history records over the years you will by now recognize the importance of records preservation. With this problem in mind, I suggest that you read a paper written by Gary T. Wright which is available on the FamilySearch.org website. It’s excellent and answers some of my own questions. Since […]

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If you live in California and have valid questions about participating in DNA tests, you’ll be interested to learn  that Jerry Brown has signed a bill into law that will prevent people from experiencing discrimination when buying a house, finding a job, health insurance, life insurance, getting a mortgage, and even education. In this day […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

The following is a news flash from Deceased Online:  “Deceased Online has a large stand at the Scottish Association of Family History Societies (SAFHS) annual conference, Adam House, Chambers Street, Edinburgh. You can meet some of our dedicated Scottish team on 25th June where we’ll be unveiling 400,000 Scottish burial and cremation records new to […]

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The Anazazi  were pueblo people who lived in the Four Corners area of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. “Anasazi (ah-nuh-SAH-zee) is a Navaho (more correctly, “Diné” or “Dineh”) word which, depending on pronunciation, means either “enemy ancestors” or “ancient people who are not us.” Many modern Puebloan descendants of the Anasazi object to the […]

Continue reading about What happened to the Anasazi civilization and why did they abandon their cities?

Sandy on September 10th, 2011

It’s not only journalism students who are taught to answer those, who, what, when, where, why, and how, questions used when analyzing the fruits of our research.  These questions can be applied to most subjects and certainly includes the evidence obtained from your genealogical sources. And, while it’s true in all instances that evidence varies […]

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Because of the changing needs of its customers, the National Library of Scotland (NLS) has plans in the works to update and develop services and functions for the 21st century. As one of the major research libraries in Europe, Scotland NLS is the only legal deposit library that has a copy anything published in the […]

Continue reading about National Library of Scotland Bill Program for Government 2011-2012

Sandy on September 7th, 2011

Another reminder from the National Genealogical Society (NGS): “This is such an exciting project for genealogists that we want to remind you about it. As the War of 1812 pensions are being digitized (see previous posts below and check out this FGS page) they are freely available to all at the Fold3 (previously Footnote) website. Currently about 69,000 […]

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The following is an informational announcement from the National Genealogical Society (NGS) about a new project funded project by The National Endowment for the Humanities: “The National Endowment for the Humanities has funded the project, “Biographies: The Atlantic Slaves Data Network” (ASDN). The ASDN will provide a platform for researchers of African slaves in the […]

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Ned Kelly was a famous Irish convict in Australia and, if you’re an Aussie you’ve often heard the expression, “As game as Ned Kelly”. In this context the word “game” means willing to face danger. Kelly was considered to be a “Robin Hood” type folk hero by some for his defiance against the British authorities […]

Continue reading about Body of infamous Aussie outlaw found and identified with DNA test

“For immediate release  AYE AYE CAPTAIN – MERCHANT NAVY ARCHIVES REVEAL PHOTOS OF UK’S FORGOTTEN ‘FOURTH SERVICE’ Churchill’s ‘fourth service’ who helped to make Britain ‘Great’ Fascinating photos of British merchant mariners from 100 years ago A ‘floating United Nations’, women and men, young boys, ‘donkeymen’ and manicurists, as well as personal descriptions such as […]

Continue reading about 1 million Merchant Navy Seamen records published by findmypast today – many include photos!

Most of us have used Wikipedia, “the world’s largest and most popular encyclopedia” as a launching pad for research on every subject under the sun. Much to my surprise, I discovered that Wikipedia is part of a much larger organization called Wikimedia. So, what is Wikimedia? “The Wikimedia Foundation,  Inc. is a nonprofit charitable organization […]

Continue reading about Wikimedia resources plus new links to NARA’s online catalog

Sandy on August 31st, 2011

FamilySearch.org has added the following records to it’s enormous database: “Austria, Mexico, Peru, U.S. Each Add Over a Million Records FamilySearch.org added over six million records to its free online database this week. The new collections include seigniorial records from Austria; civil registrations from Chihuahua, Mexico; and probate records from Kentucky, U.S. Also added this week […]

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Sandy on August 30th, 2011

Alan Stewart of Grow Your Own Family Tree publishes a lot of great information on his blog  and the latest is as follows: “TheGenealogist.co.uk has now added a large collection of new Australian records to its Diamond Premium subscription. The records add convict lists, census, general musters, ledger returns and the First Fleet, which was the name given […]

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In addition to the Facebook contest information in my recent post, I’m adding the following press release from Ancestry.com for additional information: “Enhanced Collection also Features Celebrity Yearbook Photo Gallery of Today’s Stars before They Became Famous PROVO, UTAH – August 24, 2011 – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family historyresource, today announced a massive expansion […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com Expands U.S. School Yearbook Collection To Include More Than 150 Million Records of Relative’s School Days

If you’re lucky enough to have visited the Smithsonian Museum you’ll already know it’s always free. Here’s an wonderful event sponsored by the Smithsonian for free admission to an impressive list of museums throughout the country. All you need to do is to complete an online form and then select the museum you’d like to […]

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Sandy on August 25th, 2011

I read a disturbing post on the DNA Consultants blog about a lady called Marcy who had a bad experience with a DNA company who manipulated her test results and likely those of other clients. After reading Marcy’s story, I do agree  when questions arise from the  results of a DNA test that vendors, even […]

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Here’s the latest sweepstakes information from Ancestry.com: “Ancestry.com has just announced a massive expansion of the world’s most extensive searchable collection of U.S. school yearbooks available online. It now totals over 35,000 and carries 155 million records encompassing the years 1884 to 2009. The U.S. Yearbook Collection includes close to seven million images from thousands […]

Continue reading about U.S. Yearbooks Collection Gets Major Upgrade/New Photo Sweepstakes on Facebook

The following is the latest announcement from FamilySearch.org:  “Because of what we learned from your feedback in the Record Search Pilot, several features that were part of the pilot test will be carried over into the next release of FamilySearch. Some of these features will be available right away, while others may take several months […]

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Here’s an interesting announcement from Family Tree DNA: “We are pleased to inform you about the launch of a new feature “Third Party” uploads. This will allow for the upload of 33 and 46-marker Y-DNA test results from Ancestry, GeneTree or Sorensen’s SMGF. This was a natural development since the necessary tools were created to […]

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Sandy on August 22nd, 2011

Rose O’Neal Greenhow a wealthy widow who lived in Washington at the outbreak of the Cival War was a renowned Confederate spy. As a leader in Washington, D.C. society during the period to prior the American Civil War, she traveled in important political circles cultivating  friendships and  using her connections to pass along key military information to the Confederacy at the […]

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Sandy on August 21st, 2011

I’ve seen many comments stating that genealogy has become one of the most popular hobbies around today and, in spite of this, the word genealogy is also reported to have an identity crisis. For many people the word conjures a picture of senior citizens sharing conversation starting with “In my day…” According to a quote […]

Continue reading about Genealogy is a fun way for kids to discover the past

The following is an article written by Allison Meany for the Sun News that describes a Civil War Ghost Trail program scheduled to take place on September 14, in Rorth Ridgeville, Ohio, public library: “Lorain Public Library System’s North Ridgeville Branch will host a free “Civil War Ghost Trail” program at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 […]

Continue reading about North Ridgeville library presenter to argue Civil War cemeteries are haunted

Sandy on August 19th, 2011

The following is an announcement released yesterday, Thursday, August 18,  from Footnote.com, which has now been renamed Fold3. Going forward Fold3 will focus on producing the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available: “Today we announced our intention to create the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available on […]

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Early plans have been made public in Edinburgh, Scotland, for a new festival of Scottish history during the month of November of this year. The event is being organized by Ian Harrower and comedian Susan Morrison who plan a ten-day festival involving the city’s museums, libraries, archives, local cafes, bars and shopping centers. The festival […]

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Sandy on August 18th, 2011

Ancestry.com press release says: “PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April […]

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The following is the most up-to-date information about digital convict records to be published by the UK National Archives. The records are to be transcribed, digitized and published online by Brightsolid. There’s a link to the Brightsolid website which were you can read some interesting facts about the company:  “The National Archives’ crime, courts and […]

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Sandy on August 16th, 2011

Actress Ashley Judd thought her great-great-great grandfather had lost his leg in the prison camp in Andersonville. The fact is that her ancestor lost his leg in the Battle of Saltville, Virginia and learned the truth from George Wunderlich, executive director of the National Museum of Civil Ware Medicine in Frederick, Maryland. The information was discovered […]

Continue reading about Maryland museum director solves TV history mysteries

Here’s some interesting news from FindMyPast.co.uk about a fundamental change to be made to the way the site is organized. The changes should make it a lot easier for you to find and search the millions of new records being added to their database every month: “Findmypast has grown an awful lot since we last […]

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At the beginning of the 19th century the Industrial Revolution had a strong foothold in the Scottish city of Glasgow with the manufacture of cotton and textiles, chemicals, glass, paper and soap. People from the Highlands in the north moved to the area in the 1820s and, later in the 1840s, immigrants arrived from Ireland […]

Continue reading about Victorian Glasgow, Scotland, the “Second City of the Empire”

A couple of days ago FamilySearch.org announced that their new FamilySearch Film Ordering System is available in the U.S. Northwest/West Area. This is in addition to other areas that have current access of the system.  The announcement also lists which areas will be available soon including Australia, New Zealand and Belgium: “This announcement is to […]

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Sandy on August 11th, 2011

A free webinar has been announced by Legacy Family Tree on Monday, August 15, 2011, at 2:00 p.m. ET. I’ve attended these webinars in the past and have always learned something. I’ve signed up to attend and decided to pass the following notice along to the readers of SpittalStreet: Google+ the Next Big Thing a free […]

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Sandy on August 10th, 2011

In his memoirs written in 1955, Harry Truman wrote a few pages on his decision to drop an atom bomb on the city of Hiroshima. He wrote, “I regarded the bomb as a military weapon and never had any doubt that it should be used. The top military advisors to the President, recommended its use, […]

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Chris Paton says: “Ancestral Scotland (www.ancestralscotland.com) is offering 30 free ScotlandsPeople credits, worth £7, to overseas residents in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The credits can be used at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk to view Scottish vital and census records (about 4 digitised records and two LDS 1881 census transcriptions views – wills and Arms not included).” Click […]

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We’ve been hearing on the news that Texas is experiencing one of the worst drought in the history of the state, it’s actually helping archaeologists unearth a little piece of America—a graveyard for freed slaves. Two graves have been uncovered that are believed to have been there for more than a hundred years. According to […]

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Sandy on August 4th, 2011

If you’ve ever visited Scotland you’ll remember that just about every shop with a focus on tourism has shortbread on its shelves. Shortbread is often given as a Christmas gift but it is a definite feature of Scotland’s New Year festivities. A Scottish New Year (Hogmanay) custom is to eat shortbread on New Year’s Eve. […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

FamilySearch.org says: “Records of the Swedish American Churches are a great source for genealogical information and especially for helping to establish the place of origin in Sweden. Many of the Swedish-American church records kept in American are of the same high quality found as the records of Sweden. Sweden had a State Church (1527 to […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

I saw this post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and wanted to pass it along his reference to intimate details that people share on Facebook all the while they protest sharing census information: “They may not mind sharing their most intimate details up on Facebook, but the majority of Australians want their census records destroyed for […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

According to a Reuters London article that appeared on the West Australian newspaper site,  geneticists in Zurich, Switzerland, have reconstructed the DNA profile of the boy Pharaoh and have concluded that  up to 70 percent of British men and half of all the Western European men are related to Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun. Apparently King Tut […]

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The Royal Museum of Scotland has finally reopened to the public after a £47 million (pounds Sterling) transformation.  It’s a moment thousands of people from the capital city of Edinburgh (pronounced Edinburra) and many visitors from around the world have been waiting for. The  light-filled Victorian building with its soaring Grand Gallery was cherished for […]

Continue reading about Revamped Royal Museum of Scotland opens to the public after three years

Some of you may have read in newspaper or heard on TV that the journal Science stated that they had discovered that a genetic signature could predict longevity. I’d like to share a blog post by 23andMe informing readers that the authors have formally retracted the longevity study as follows: “Last summer, a study published in the […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The Magna Carta (Great Charter) is an English charter that was originally issued in the year 1215 and then reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. It included the most direct challenges to the monarch’s authority and first became law in 1225. The 1297 version and the most commonly known still remains on the statute books of England and […]

Continue reading about The Magna Carta conservation challenge

According to Toronto’s CTV news,  on Thursday July 28th archaeologists in Dresden, Ontario began a search using high-tech ground penetrating radar to find lost graves at the Uncle Tom’s Cabin historic site in southwestern Ontario, Canada.  The site is owned and operated by the Ontario Heritage Trust. Ground-penetrating radar sends radar waves into the ground […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

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The following information from Brigham Young University (BYU) sounds as though their Conference on Family History and Genealogy will be fascinating as well as educational: “The 43rd annual BYU Conference on Family History and Genealogy may not be making history, but participants are preparing to find it. Approximately 600-700 participants are taking part in more […]

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