History

There’s an entry dated April 19 on the Ancestry.com blog about the indexing of the 1940 census. The purpose of the article is to answer the question many have been asking as to why their state is not listed yet. I did mention in a previous blog post that I didn’t expect to see the […]

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The following is an announcement from The Foundation for the National Archives: “WASHINGTON, April 18, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – The Foundation for the National Archives announces the publication of the Genealogy Tool Kit: Getting Started on Your Family History at the National Archives, written by National Archives genealogy archives specialist John P. Deeben. This 160-page step-by-step guide […]

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Sandy on April 12th, 2012

FamilySearch.org volunteers have been hard at work indexing the 1940 census. A lot of people are asking questions about the progress of the effort and when and in what order the states will be posted on FamilySearch and on the FamilySearch Indexing site. Every day more states are posted and the team is planning to […]

Continue reading about Family Search 1940 US Census State release order

Today The National Museum of American History has opened and exhibit with iconic objects from pop culture and items dating back to the arrival of the Pilgrim’s arrival in Plymouth, Massachusets in 1620. The exhibit titled “American Stories” is a chronology of U.S. history, including early European encounters with Native Americans to a Barack Obama […]

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The British National Archives is planning the launch of their new website Discovery at the end of June 2012.  Having  found that searching the site and finding cogent information has been a challenge with the old system, this is music to my ‘eyes’. Discovery will replace the current Catalogue site and offers additional features, which […]

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Sandy on April 3rd, 2012

For 100 years the tragic sinking of the Titanic has been discussed, filmed, been the subject of fiction and non –fiction.  Most of us have thought about it in terms of a horrible tragedy of an unsinkable ship being torn apart by an iceberg lurking below the surface of the water in a place it […]

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I mentioned in my blog post a few days ago that I had serious doubts that the launch of the 1940 census would run smoothly because of a high volume of users trying to access the website at the same time. Unfortunately, I was correct—in the world of Internet Technology there is never enough band […]

Continue reading about 1940 Census: They expected a flood and got a Tsunami!

FamilySearch.org has, only a few days ago, added just over 34 million new records online for the following countries: Brazil Canada Chile Columbia Czech Republic England France Germany Ireland Mexico Norway Peru Portugal Puerto Rico Scotland United States Wales. You can search this amazing newly digitized collection as well as a startling 2.5 billion other records […]

Continue reading about Over 25 million World War One Draft Registration Cards added at FamilySearch

Document preservation is serious business whether it be your own personal records or our National Archives. You might know, in comparison  to most of our efforts, the national archives wins hands-down. The following press release from the National Archives takes viewers inside their state-of-the-art preservation lab where you’ll see a series of videos which demonstrates […]

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Sandy on March 29th, 2012

Having viewed this outstanding New York Public Library video on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter via a tip from a  newsletter reader Amy Gonigam, I just had to pass it along. I continue to support the opinion, if you discover your own family history it helps one to understand and appreciate those who came before. Solving the […]

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From crofts to castles you’ll  find a  fascinating snapshot of Scotland during the First World War and a major new family history resource as the Valuation Rolls of Scotland go online for the first time. The news release is as follows: “A detailed picture of wartime Scotland is revealed today with the release of details from […]

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Sandy on March 27th, 2012

Over a million baptism marriage and burial records dating back to 1538 are now available at Findmypast.co.uk. This is the first time that images of original parish records from London’s Westminster are online. Additionally, the records can now be searched free of charge by visiting the Life Events (BMDs) section of Findmypast. The press release […]

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Sandy on March 26th, 2012

Joris Dik and his team of experts at the Delft University of Technology made the decision to use X-rays to examine a painting Still Life with Meadow Flowers and Roses on display in the Kroeller-Mueller Museum in the Netherlands. In the late1990s, X-rays were used to reveal an image, of two men wrestling, under the […]

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The following is an interesting and useful press release I received from Ancestry.com: “Families Can Connect to the Bay State’s Historical Past Through Centuries of Birth, Marriage and Death Records Which Are Now Available Online For the First Time PROVO, UT, March 20, 2012 — Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com Publishes the Most Comprehensive Collection of Massachusetts Vital Records Ever Compiled

Sandy on March 19th, 2012

You may have read my recent post on this blog MyHeritage the world’s largest family genealogy network now offers DNA testing regarding the business move at MyHeritage to integrate their DNA database with the Family Tree DNA and a customer base of 62 million users. This means an expansion into new markets for the benefit of […]

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Sandy on March 16th, 2012

Crista Cowan writing on the Ancestry.com blog offers some useful research tips  for people with a little or a lot of Irish in them as follows: “One in eight Americans claim Irish ancestry according to an American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008. That works out to about 36 million people. […]

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Sandy on March 5th, 2012

Grow Your Own Family Tree says: “Marriage licence bonds for the Diocese of Raphoe have been made available online. Find My Past Ireland has put online Raphoe marriage licence bonds covering the periods from 1710-55 and 1817-30. Find My Past says: “[The bonds] are extremely useful for those researching their Irish family history with ancestors from […]

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The World Memory Project has keyed more than one million records. All the records contain important information on individual victims of the Holocaust and Nazi persecution from children in Germany to Jewish victims at camps in Poland, the Czech Republic and Ukraine. The information is available free of charge on Ancestry.com and will help survivors and […]

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Sandy on February 27th, 2012

My cousin who lives in Australia emailed me an amazing link to the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Queen Street, Edinburgh, Scotland. The gallery which originally opened in 1889 was closed from 2009 to 2011 for a major renovation. This refurbishment included the improvement of a frieze that goes around the Main Hall of the […]

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Sandy on February 24th, 2012

Findmypast.co.uk says: “You can now search 359,000 records of Merchant Navy Seamen for the period 1835-1857 on findmypast.co.uk We have made these 19th century Merchant Navy records available online for the first time, working in association with The National Archives. From 1835, the central government started to monitor a potential reserve ofsailors for the Royal […]

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We’re all aware that privacy has become increasingly important and during these days of the Internet where a disturbing amount of information is available online—whether accurate or not and usually not. Today, Ancestry.com is taking extra measures to make sure that your data online at Ancestry is protected. To this end they have published a […]

Continue reading about Hot of the Press: Ancestry.com has published a new Privacy Philosophy

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has announced that the 1940 census will be available on April 2, 2012 and will be online at 9:00 a.m. (Eastern). This is an official website of NARA in partnership with Archives.com. The link to the site will be: 1940Census.archives.gov Click on the video below to watch the […]

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The National Genealogical Society (NGS) is cracking down, with good reason, on folks recording presentations at the NGS Family History Conference. Without prior written permission, the NGS will not allow “audio recordings, still photograph, video recordings, or written transcripts”. You can still communicate via Facebook, Twitter, Google+, or blog at the conferences, but only to […]

Continue reading about The National Genealogical Society’s new social media policy

Plans are in the works for The National Library of Wales in conjunction with Welsh Library and archives to digitize First World War records.  I’ve decided to pass along the following information from Alan Stewart’s UK and Ireland genealogy news blog Grow Your Own Family Tree: “The National Library of Wales, together with Welsh libraries […]

Continue reading about Welsh First World War history to be digitized for online research

February 7, marked the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens and I’ve seen reports of several productions to mark the occasion. The BBC You Tube video is a terrific cartoon and helps us get to know Dickens in a memorable way. Enjoy the video below:

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“The House Ways and Means Committee Subcommittee on Social Security is proposing to completely shut down use of the SSDI by genealogists as well as other industries such as banking and insurance that rely upon its information. Such an attempt is short-sighted and runs counter to the original purpose of the SSDI: to actually combat […]

Continue reading about STOP ID THEFT NOW—Genealogy Community responds to efforts to remove access to Social Security Death Index and Other Records

Former CEO at FamilySearch.org, Jay Verkler, said in a RootsTech speech that he believes 7 billion people will participate in family history 40 years from now.  This is not hard to believe—unlike the fad hobbies that come and go, family history search is gaining speed. We are now able to find so much genealogy information […]

Continue reading about Former CEO at FamilySearch predicts 7 billion people will participate in genealogy by 2060

Sandy on February 6th, 2012

The Rootstech conference is likeley the most important conference to attend and discover emerging technologies and devices to improve your genealogy research. It’s packed with hands-on workshops and interactive presentations.  It’s all over now, but there’s always next year. FamilySearch.org has uploaded a collection of You Tube videos featuring commentary from Rootstech 2012 attendees and […]

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Everyone in the U.S. is hyped with anticipation for the Super Bowl on Sunday. Go Giants! Many people don’t realize how the game evolved to became the phenomenon that it is today. When I learned that this American pastime was shaped by the military, it wasn’t a stretch to envision a violent north eastern college […]

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Having written about British genealogy company brightsolid (poet e.e. cummings would love the use of lower case “b”) a couple of times recently I’m not surprised to be tapping out another post. My last entry was about their sponsorship of the currently active Rootstech conference and their imminent plans to enter the genealogy market here in […]

Continue reading about Brightsolid to launch pay-as-you-go census records site—try the beta version for free

I’ve written about this important topic twice Social Security Death Index (SSDI) no longer available to the public and SSDI: A different and interesting point of view about losing access to an important resource. Today, I’d like to take the opportunity to point you to a “call to action” from The Legal Genealogist Judy Russell to […]

Continue reading about Call to action to save our access to the Social Security Death Index SSDI

This is a true story that few want to acknowledge because it’s shameful. It sheds light on an aspect of WWII that needs to be told, if only for those brave men who suffered because of pure vindictiveness. An article in the Mail Online tells the story of a couple of  airman who, along with […]

Continue reading about How Irish troops were blacklisted by their own Prime Minister de Valera for fighting against Hitler in WWII

Having recently read a list of MyHeritage.com accomplishments for 2011, this year I’ll be paying a lot more attention to what they’re offering users. It’s probably the second most popular genealogy site in the global community, Ancestry.com being number one. They’re predicting that 2012 will be equally good and I wouldn’t doubt it. Like other […]

Continue reading about An interesting year for the number two genealogy website, some say number one

On, January 25th every year Scots all over the world gather to celebrate the birth date of Robert Burns (25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796).  My cousin shares the same birthday as the Bard—Happy Birthday T.B. Robert Burns, born in Alloway, Ayreshire, Scotland, is also known as the Ploughman Poet.  His popularity back then (and […]

Continue reading about In celebration of Scotland’s poet Robert Burns birthday–The Bard

Sandy on January 23rd, 2012

I received this stirring video from a relative, T. Smith of Indiana. I hope you take the time to view the entire footage: http://youtu.be/EeZvForbmbk

Continue reading about A must see Civil War Veteran Footage on MP3 video

Sandy on January 23rd, 2012

London, England’s dockland baptism records are now online at Findmypast.co.uk as follows: “We’ve just published 16,696 new London Docklands baptism records on findmypast.co.uk – excellent news for all of you with Docklands ancestors. Further details of these baptism records are as follows: St Dunstan, Stepney: 10,035 baptism entries spanning 1668-1679 Christchurch, Spitalfields: 6,661 baptism entries […]

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The disaster of the Costa Concordia will probably never be forgotten nor will the fact that the captain Franceso Schettino apparently abandoned the ship while there were still hundreds of people aboard. This included two newborns and four disabled people who were not rescued until 2 a.m. I’ve heard various different versions of the story […]

Continue reading about The captain of the Costo Concordia is one of many who broke the historical code of chivalry

The fact that the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso,  is visiting Scotland speaks of a whole new world and a very exciting one for the pupils from all Edinburgh schools because they are going to have the Dalai Lama’s speech broadcast in their classrooms during his visit to the Capital. The enthusiasm can probably be […]

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Sandy on January 19th, 2012

Findmypast.co.uk has recently published the following 3,749 records by courtesy of the Cheshire Family History Society: “These records could provide essential new information for those of you with Cheshire ancestors. Further details are as follows: Type of records: Burials Number of records: 3,749 Date range: 1800-2002 Parish / place: Appleton The Cheshire Family History Society […]

Continue reading about New Cheshire, England, parish burial records published

Many people don’t realize that Brightsolid is part of a very big organization. It’s actually owned by DC Thomson (the Thomson family), a huge and long established British company that can probably compared to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. DC Thomson has been in the publishing business for over  a 100 years. They publish The Courier […]

Continue reading about Brightsolid organization voted best in genealogy for 2011

An article in today’s  Charlotte Observer  provides  theory but still no clear evidence about what happened to the H.L. Hunley a Confederate submarine (the  secret hope of the Confederacy) that sank near Charleston, South Carolina in 1864. The Hunley was the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. The public will soon have […]

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On December 14, 1991, Sarah Yarborough arrived at her Seattle, Washington,  high school early so that she could catch the 9:30 a.m. bus to take her cheerleading team to an away competition. Sarah’s body was found at 9:15 a.m. near her school by a jogger only 150 feet away from her parked car. She had […]

Continue reading about Police hold DNA of 1991 killer that traces back to 17th century Mayflower family

Okay, so were now in the second week of 2012 and your inbox has probably been filled with ideas for potential goals for the next twelve months. If you’re like the majority of people, administrative and clerical tasks are considered mundane chores in comparison with all the interesting research you do to find who or […]

Continue reading about Simple but useful goals for genealogists and others in 2012

The following is a news release from Ancestry.com which shows an interesting and optimistic trend not only for Ancestry but also for enthusiastic family history researchers:   “PROVO, Utah, Jan. 5, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today reported that it ended the fourth quarter with 1,703,000 […]

Continue reading about Start the new year right Ancestry.com has 1.7 million subscribers mid to high teens are catching on too

We’re often told that the moment we’re born the end of live process begins. The same can be said for “The Last Supper” completed in 1498 by Leonardo da Vinci. As soon as the fresco was completed, it started to deteriorate. The famous painting has suffered over the centuries from human carelessness, humidity, pollution, a […]

Continue reading about Researchers from USC perform study to save da Vinci’s “The Last Supper” from environmental toxins

I’m writing about the Carnegie Free Library in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, because I believe that libraries and the services they offer are, instead of diminishing in importance, actually increasing in importance as a resource for people who need them for the host of resources typically offered at libraries. This post refers to an article written by […]

Continue reading about Carnegie Free Library in trouble but will still increase community resources

Sandy on January 3rd, 2012

Inhabited about 800 to 1000 years ago the Town Creek Indian Mound near Mount Gilead, North Carolina, may be one of the oldest villages in the area and is one of the most popular State Historic Sites in North Carolina. It was once a bustling place that contained homes, work areas and ceremonial buildings, built […]

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Sandy on December 31st, 2011

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards:

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On December 29, 1990, four hundred people held an Indian spiritual ceremony at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, marking one hundred years at a mass grave where Sioux Indians were mowed down by federal troops. More than 200 of those who attended the event arrived on horseback after completing a 175-mile journey that began in Fort […]

Continue reading about Remembering those who were slain at Wounded Knee, South Dakota

For years it has been said that the shroud of Turin is a fake, now scientists have found evidence that it could after all be authentic. And, let’s face the fact that we will always have the believers, the non-believers, those who want it to be a fake no matter what, and those who are […]

Continue reading about New scientific evidence: The image on the shroud of Turin created by a flash of electromagnetic energy

Sandy on December 20th, 2011

Starting on the 25th of the Jewish month of Kislev, Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights. It coincides with late November or late December on the secular calendar. This year Hanukkah begins at sundown today December 20.. It all began in 168 B.C.E. when the Jewish Temple was seized by […]

Continue reading about Happy Hanukkah! The message and the miracle of the oil

From various historical sources, Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) is thought to be one of the most controversial figures in British history. Cromwell was considered a regicidal (murderer of a monarch) a dictator by some and a hero of liberty by others and his almost genocidal activities against Catholics in Scotland […]

Continue reading about British National Archives records reveal Christmas was once canceled

Hot on the heals of my article yesterday titled, Social Security Death Index (SSDI) no longer available to the public  about the denial of access to SSDI, I’m passing along worthwhile commentary published on Dick Eastman’s, Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, Genealogists are Losing Access to SSDI, Mostly Due to Misinformation, detailing a very interesting point of view regarding this loss […]

Continue reading about SSDI: A different and interesting point of view about losing access to an important resource

The film adaption of Michael Morpurgo’s book War Horse is planned for release in the UK on January 13th of next year. It’s a World War I tale set in 1914 and is the story of Joey, a young and beautiful bay-red horse with a distinctive cross on his nose sold to the army. With […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.co.uk. partners with Disney to promote War Horse movie release

More than 400 Navajos served as top-secret Code Talkers in the military during World War II. At a time when the best cryptographers fell short of the mark, these modest people successfully contrived the most ingenious and successful code in military history and it completely baffled the Japanese. The unbreakable code played a central part […]

Continue reading about Inspiring interview: World War II Navajo Code Talker Chester Nez

Sandy on December 6th, 2011

I received the following poem from one of my LinkedIn Groups and decided to share this amusing and perceptive illustration, which demonstrates the enthusiasm for researching family history and how it just grabs you…  “Grandma and the Family Tree  Author: unknown  There’s been a change in Grandma, we’ve noticed her of late, She’s reading history […]

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Sandy on December 1st, 2011

From the Society of Genealogists (UK): “The IGRS has issued the following press release and I have to say the the Society of Genealogists most definitely shares their worries: The Irish Genealogical Research Society (ITGRS) is concerned that a so-called merger of the National Archives “into” the National Library could diminish these vital heritage services. […]

Continue reading about Irish Archive and Library Reforms Worry Genealogists

St. Andrews is the Patron Saint of Scotland and although widely celebrated every year on November 30th in Scotland every year since the 6th century, St. Andrew’s Day isn’t recognized as a public holiday. There are about 40 million people throughout the world who claim Scottish descent so, as you can well imagine, there’s a […]

Continue reading about Happy St. Andrew’s Day! To 40 million who claim Scottish descent…

Hot off the press: The following is a newsflash released today from Ancestry.com about their new mobile app that gives users the ability to access billions of historical records to build their new family tree:  “PROVO, Utah, Nov. 29, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced the […]

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The British Newspaper Archive officially launched their vast resources today. They have a lot of activities planned for today so if, like me you don’t live in London you can still follow on Facebook, You Tube, or click on the link to the website: “Today is the launch day for the British Newspaper Archive –www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk – […]

Continue reading about Official launch of the British Newspaper Archive a Digital Sheherazade…

The University of St Andrews, founded in 1413, is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English-speaking world. Talented researchers at St Andrews University, have officially launched a new online catalog of books published between the invention of print and the end of the 16th century. The work is the result of over […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s St. Andrews University 10-year treasure hunt leads to world’s first bibliography of the 16th century

Here’s a newsflash from Enhanced Online News (EON): “PROVO, Utah & LONDON & TEL AVIV, Israel–(EON: Enhanced Online News)–MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, announced today the acquisition of FamilyLink.com, Inc., maker of the family history content sites FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com. This is MyHeritage’s seventh and largest acquisition since 2007. The purchase marks a […]

Continue reading about MyHeritage Acquires FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com a significant U.S. market move

Sandy on November 21st, 2011

Many moons ago in a classroom in Scotland, I learned how Native American showed great respect for the land and the animals who shared it with their tribes. I was reminded of this today when I read that North America’s oldest white bison, Yvnvssv Hetke, had died. Yvnvssv Hetke—Muscogee for bison—was about 30 years old. He […]

Continue reading about RIP Yvnvssv Hetke: North America’s Oldest White Bison

Sandy on November 18th, 2011

Did you know that Ireland’s County Cork is toying with the idea of secession from the Republic of Ireland? (As reported in Cork Independent online–not serious). Although county official Laura McGonigle isn’t really proposing secession, she has come up with an interesting idea to issue a “Cork Passport” to people with family ties to Cork […]

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Here’s the latest information from Ancestry.com about their Advanced Image Viewer: “Several years ago, we launched the Advanced Image Viewer. This viewer provided some much-needed capabilities and was welcomed by the users who could take advantage of it. Our other users – almost 50% of our total user base – continued to use a basic […]

Continue reading about Beta Image Viewer available from Ancestry for faster image loading