History

Sandy on August 19th, 2011

The following is an announcement released yesterday, Thursday, August 18,  from Footnote.com, which has now been renamed Fold3. Going forward Fold3 will focus on producing the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available: “Today we announced our intention to create the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available on […]

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Early plans have been made public in Edinburgh, Scotland, for a new festival of Scottish history during the month of November of this year. The event is being organized by Ian Harrower and comedian Susan Morrison who plan a ten-day festival involving the city’s museums, libraries, archives, local cafes, bars and shopping centers. The festival […]

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Sandy on August 18th, 2011

Ancestry.com press release says: “PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April […]

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The following is the most up-to-date information about digital convict records to be published by the UK National Archives. The records are to be transcribed, digitized and published online by Brightsolid. There’s a link to the Brightsolid website which were you can read some interesting facts about the company:  “The National Archives’ crime, courts and […]

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Sandy on August 16th, 2011

Actress Ashley Judd thought her great-great-great grandfather had lost his leg in the prison camp in Andersonville. The fact is that her ancestor lost his leg in the Battle of Saltville, Virginia and learned the truth from George Wunderlich, executive director of the National Museum of Civil Ware Medicine in Frederick, Maryland. The information was discovered […]

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At the beginning of the 19th century the Industrial Revolution had a strong foothold in the Scottish city of Glasgow with the manufacture of cotton and textiles, chemicals, glass, paper and soap. People from the Highlands in the north moved to the area in the 1820s and, later in the 1840s, immigrants arrived from Ireland […]

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A couple of days ago FamilySearch.org announced that their new FamilySearch Film Ordering System is available in the U.S. Northwest/West Area. This is in addition to other areas that have current access of the system.  The announcement also lists which areas will be available soon including Australia, New Zealand and Belgium: “This announcement is to […]

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Sandy on August 10th, 2011

In his memoirs written in 1955, Harry Truman wrote a few pages on his decision to drop an atom bomb on the city of Hiroshima. He wrote, “I regarded the bomb as a military weapon and never had any doubt that it should be used. The top military advisors to the President, recommended its use, […]

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The saying “dead man walking” didn’t cut the mustard in comparison to what Tremayne Gray had to experience. Mr. Gray’s plight is one that is similar to thousands of Americans who are mistakenly reported dead every year by the Social Security Administration or other federal agencies. Illinois reportedly has one of the highest rates of […]

Continue reading about False government death reports leave people in the lurch

Chris Paton says: “Ancestral Scotland (www.ancestralscotland.com) is offering 30 free ScotlandsPeople credits, worth £7, to overseas residents in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The credits can be used at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk to view Scottish vital and census records (about 4 digitised records and two LDS 1881 census transcriptions views – wills and Arms not included).” Click […]

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We’ve been hearing on the news that Texas is experiencing one of the worst drought in the history of the state, it’s actually helping archaeologists unearth a little piece of America—a graveyard for freed slaves. Two graves have been uncovered that are believed to have been there for more than a hundred years. According to […]

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Sandy on August 4th, 2011

If you’ve ever visited Scotland you’ll remember that just about every shop with a focus on tourism has shortbread on its shelves. Shortbread is often given as a Christmas gift but it is a definite feature of Scotland’s New Year festivities. A Scottish New Year (Hogmanay) custom is to eat shortbread on New Year’s Eve. […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

FamilySearch.org says: “Records of the Swedish American Churches are a great source for genealogical information and especially for helping to establish the place of origin in Sweden. Many of the Swedish-American church records kept in American are of the same high quality found as the records of Sweden. Sweden had a State Church (1527 to […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

I saw this post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and wanted to pass it along his reference to intimate details that people share on Facebook all the while they protest sharing census information: “They may not mind sharing their most intimate details up on Facebook, but the majority of Australians want their census records destroyed for […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

According to a Reuters London article that appeared on the West Australian newspaper site,  geneticists in Zurich, Switzerland, have reconstructed the DNA profile of the boy Pharaoh and have concluded that  up to 70 percent of British men and half of all the Western European men are related to Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun. Apparently King Tut […]

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The Royal Museum of Scotland has finally reopened to the public after a £47 million (pounds Sterling) transformation.  It’s a moment thousands of people from the capital city of Edinburgh (pronounced Edinburra) and many visitors from around the world have been waiting for. The  light-filled Victorian building with its soaring Grand Gallery was cherished for […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The Magna Carta (Great Charter) is an English charter that was originally issued in the year 1215 and then reissued later in the 13th century in modified versions. It included the most direct challenges to the monarch’s authority and first became law in 1225. The 1297 version and the most commonly known still remains on the statute books of England and […]

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According to Toronto’s CTV news,  on Thursday July 28th archaeologists in Dresden, Ontario began a search using high-tech ground penetrating radar to find lost graves at the Uncle Tom’s Cabin historic site in southwestern Ontario, Canada.  The site is owned and operated by the Ontario Heritage Trust. Ground-penetrating radar sends radar waves into the ground […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

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Sandy on July 29th, 2011

If, like me, you didn’t realize that the General Motors Corporation Cadillac was originally owned by the Cadillac Automobile Company the country’s leading luxury automaker you’ll be interested to learn that on July 29, 1909, the newly formed General Motors Corporation  (GM) purchased the Cadillac  for $4.5 million. Cadillac  grew from the  ruins of automotive […]

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The following information from Brigham Young University (BYU) sounds as though their Conference on Family History and Genealogy will be fascinating as well as educational: “The 43rd annual BYU Conference on Family History and Genealogy may not be making history, but participants are preparing to find it. Approximately 600-700 participants are taking part in more […]

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“Findmypast.co.uk has released over 290,000 new parish records going back the the sixteenth century covering Warwickshire, Sheffield, Suffolk and Rugby. The records provide essential plugs to gaps in the records and may prove vital in enabling you to trace your ancestors. Have a look at the detail in the table below: Church and type Number of […]

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Amy Sell of Findmypast.co.uk has released the following records: “WOMEN IN BUSINESS CELEBRATED IN NEWLY RELEASED RECORDS Fascinating Business Indexes released online Banned female author Radclyffe Hall of contentious novel The Well of Loneliness listed Celebrated British companies Cadburys, Barclays, Rolls Royce, Lyons, and Harrods all included Set against the backdrop of the early twentieth century, […]

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Sandy on July 14th, 2011

According to Richard Hill’s post on his DNA Testing Adviser web site: “DNA Heritage ceased operations in April 2011 and transferred existing customer results to Family Tree DNA. FTDNA has now announced the conversion program. The Y-DNA conversion to the basic 25-marker level is free. Existing DNA Heritage customers should click the link below and opt […]

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Sandy on July 14th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Findmypast.co.uk: “We are very proud to announce the launch of four sets of nineteenth and twentieth century military records to help enrich your family history. The records provide useful detail including attestation and leaving dates, achievements made in service and soldiers’ physical appearence. And, certainly in the case of the […]

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As a reminder, iOS is Apple’s mobile operating system originally developed for the iPhone it has been developed to support other Apple devices such as iPad, iPod touch and Apple TV. It’s not available for Android. That said, this blog post is about the latest App for iOS the Wolfram Genealogy and History Research Assistant […]

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This post is not about an ancient Chinese dynasty it’s an amazing story of the genealogy of New York’s Wu-Tang Clan, an infamous organization with roots in Staten Island, New York.  It’s only one of the subcultures that arose as masses of Chinese and Southeast Asian immigrants flooded to New York in search of better lives. […]

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According to an article in the Guysborough Journal  the Guysborough Historical Society (GHS) has opened a new research center in thebasement of the Old Courthouse Museum. It’s available for use by visitors and locals for genealogical research. Easy and safe access to museum archives, books and records is available year-round. The GHS also hopes that […]

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Two hundred and thirty-four years ago today, the independent state of New York elected its first governor, Brigadier General George Clinton. In addition to being New York’s longest-serving governor, he was also the longest-serving governor of the United States. Clinton held the post from 1777-1795 and again from 1801-1804. He was also elected to the […]

Continue reading about On July 9 1777 New York elected its first governor George Clinton

The Maori’s of New Zealand wrote a collection of 19th century manuscripts recording their lives before the arrival of Europeans. These records have been officially listed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World New Zealand register. UNESCO was established in 1945 by the United Nations to promote the exchange of ideas, information and culture. Found among […]

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The Japanese samurai warriors were members of the military class of pre-industrial Japan. By the end of the 12th century, the word samurai became almost synonymous with Bushido (the way of the warrior), the word was closely associated with the middle and upper echelons of the warrior class. Samurai used a wide range of weapons, […]

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Following a court-ordered search, an estimated $22 billion worth of gold, jewels and statues has been discovered in a southern India 16th century Sri Padmanabhaswamy temple. It’s the largest find of this type in India and there’s likely to be more. On Monday searchers started to unseal Section B of the vaults, a large space […]

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The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

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Sandy on July 6th, 2011

MyHeritige.com has posted information today about a new offering called Family Goals which permits families to split the bill on Premium and PremiumPlus subscriptions. This enables family members to chip in to cover the costs thus making family history research more affordable and, at the same time, encourage the wider family to become more connected […]

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When you make the decision to research your family tree you may want to ponder a while before you proceed, just to make sure that you’ll be able to accept what you uncover. People normally share stories about the good things of life or sad stories with happy endings, leaving out the shocking realities that […]

Continue reading about Warning! Unraveling a family tree may not be what you expect

Sandy on June 29th, 2011

Grow Your Own Family Tree says: “One of the most comprehensive records of the Irish 1916 Easter Rising has been released in a fully searchable structured index for the first time. The Sinn Féin Rebellion Handbook was published by the Irish Times in 1917 and provides a fascinating insight into one of the most important […]

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Sandy on June 29th, 2011

I’ve seen many books on the origins and function of Freemasonry but started to think about it on a more personal level after re-reading my grandfather’s obituary, which included the fact that he was a member of two Masonic lodges. After making a couple of inquiries I was informed that because of the secrecy involved […]

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If you’ve been searching for an ancestor in the right place only to discover that you were looking in the wrong county, The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries could prove to be a great help. How often have you searched for an ancestor only to discover that although you were searching in the right place […]

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Up until a couple of years ago, the basic operations of our libraries hadn’t changed much since philanthropists like Andrew Carnegie donated more than $40,000,000 to build about 1,700 libraries in communities throughout the country. Now, the very existence of our libraries is threatened. Like many businesses, libraries all over the country—if they haven’t been […]

Continue reading about What’s happening to public libraries in the face of new technology and budget cutbacks?

Sandy on June 27th, 2011

The following post appeared on the Family Search blog. The FamilySearch.org website provides a continuing learning experience in genealogy and it’s free: “Those of Irish ancestry are well aware of Ireland’s turbulent, troubled history and costly fight for independence. Adding to Ireland’s painful saga was the bloody Irish Civil War fought between1922-1923. One of the […]

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I’ve just finished reading an amazing article in the Monterey County Weekly about a dedicated family historian’s 21-year quest to uncover his ancestors. His story starts out like many others, using the same popular resources that most of us are familiar with, but the results are astounding. Gary Carlsen was cleaning his attic in 1990 […]

Continue reading about Family Historian’s research reveals 18,000 direct and in-law relatives dating back to 1847

Sandy on June 24th, 2011

Findmypast.co.uk has just released a huge index and images of  WO96 militia records for 1806-1915. The records are a valuable resource for genealogy research.  See below: “We’ve just published over half a million Militia Service Records, covering 1806 to 1915, in association with The National Archives and in partnership with FamilySearch. This is the first time these records […]

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Sandy on June 24th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Ancestry.com “There is nothing like meeting and connecting with fellow genealogists. So mark your calendar and join Ancestry.com at the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Washington, DC, August 14-19. This is the 31st year that IAJGS (International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies) has hosted this conference and we’re […]

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Sandy on June 23rd, 2011

The East India Company was created as a Royal Charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I (1533 – 1603) . It has been said that without it the world would not be the same today. It changed the world’s tastes, it’s thinking and it’s people by creating new communities, trading places, and shaped countries and established […]

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Sandy on June 22nd, 2011

FindMyPast.co.uk says: “Adding to our British Army Service Records 1760-1915 collection, we have just published over 500,000 soliders’ records in our Militia service records 1806-1915. These records offer a rich source of information to the family historian, especially because attestation papers form a major part of this collection. Attestation refers to the papers drawn up upon […]

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Sandy on June 22nd, 2011

The publisher of WhitePages in Australia, Sensis, has noted the increasing popularity of non-Anglo surnames in the most populous state of Australia, New South Wales. And, the change is big. Apparently the Nguyens (pronounced Win or Wynne) are making good ground on the Joneses. Typical Aussie names like Smith, Jones and Brown are still leaders […]

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“The Brooklyn Historical Society’s four-story Queen Anne style building was completed in 1881 and was designed by architect George B. Post. Post’s bold use of extensive terra cotta ornamentation on the façade, and innovative truss system to support the ceiling of the central library, has long been revered by architectural historians.” Plans for interior renovations […]

Continue reading about Brooklyn Historical Society’s modern update renovation plans unveiled

Sandy on June 20th, 2011

One of the world’s largest collections of historic books, pamphlets and periodicals housed at the British Library at, 96 Euston Road, London, are to be scanned by Google and made available on the Internet in a deal reached with Google. The deal is to scan 250,000 texts dating back to the 18th century will allow […]

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If, like me, you’ve been researching on FamilySearch.org for several years and have been accustomed to finding things on the old site and are struggling with the new interface, you’ll be happy to know that you can now search for historical records using batch numbers from the International Genealogical Index (IGI). What’s a Batch Number? […]

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Sandy on June 15th, 2011

Why I would think that backroom politics happened during the Tudor and Stuart Early Modern period beats me. The UK National Archives has made available online documents exposing backroom politics from 1509-1714 for academic research as follows: “The largest set of government documents from the Early Modern period is now available online for academic research. […]

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Ian Tester of findmypast says: “Hello – I’m Ian Tester, the Product Manager for findmypast, and I wanted to let you know about a neat little project we’re in the middle of to make your experience of searching records a little better. You may have noticed recently that small blue stars have started appearing next […]

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Sandy on June 13th, 2011

Today, forty years after they were first leaked, all 7000 pages of the Pentagon Papers are finally declassified and publicly released. They have been released in book form more than once. And, as it turns out, those texts were incomplete. Now that everything has been made public the papers can now be read in their […]

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The DNA test results for a family member have just come in and we’re amazed at the results. A few years ago, although I’d never considered it, I would have been wary of taking a DNA test. Because of the convincing security measures taken by the well-known testing services, there is probably more danger lurking […]

Continue reading about Autosomal DNA testing could break down those genealogical brick walls

Scotland’s Loch Ness monster was first written about in Adamnan’s Life of Columba, in which the missionary described how St. Columba persuaded a fierce sea creature to close its jaws and go in peace instead of devouring a  fellow monk. The first newspaper account of a sighting of the monster was not until 1933,when the […]

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Sandy on June 8th, 2011

The National Genealogical Society says: “The National Genealogical Society proudly announces the release of its newest American Genealogy Studies course, Introduction to Civil War Records,developed by renowned military expert Craig Roberts Scott, cg. Craig Roberts Scott is a nationally recognized lecturer, educator, and genealogical and historical researcher with more than thirty years’ experience. He is a member of […]

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Sandy on June 6th, 2011

I found this article  posted on Chris Paton’s blog Scotland’s Greatest Story today and by extension EOGN. I often read “The Scotsman” newspaper online and missed this one. The things people do never ceases to amaze me. “A member of the IT staff at the National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk) has pleaded guilty at Edinburgh Sheriff […]

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The British Royal Family has come a long way in the past two generations, especially Queen Elizabeth II (and 1st of Scotland) who was likely thrust into a new reality when she agreed to the divorce of Prince Charles and that of her children Prince Andrew and Princess Anne. Not to mention the behavioral patterns […]

Continue reading about Royal household saw Prince Philip as an outsider for going to ‘crank’ school

Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

On the first Friday of June each year, National Doughnut Day is celebrated by the Salvation Army who created it in 1938 to honor the women who served donuts to soldiers during World War I. Many doughnut stores in the United States offer free doughnuts on National Doughnut Day. In 2009, small doughnut vendors as […]

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Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

Last year’s New Zealand Family History Fair was a great success and over 1000 visitors enjoyed the event that included free access to Ancestry.com, Findmypast, The Genealogist, Footnote, My Heritage, World Vital Records, and FamilyRelatives. Quite a lineup. This year’s fair schedule to take place 26 – 27 August, at Claudelands Events Centre in Hamilton […]

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Paula Hinkel, Director, Vice President at Southern California Genealogical Society. Co-Chair, Southern California Genealogy Jamboree has posted the following message on LinkedIn: “This is the last call for Jamboree pre-registration, which closes 11:59 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, June 1. This email will list links to all of the Jamboree activities in the SCGS online shopping cart. […]

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Sandy on June 2nd, 2011

The following is a news release from Generation Maps now renamed Family ChartMasters: “Cedar Hills, Utah. — June 1st, 2011 — Generation Maps, the leading genealogy chart printing service, announces today that it is changing its name to Family ChartMasters. “We’ve decided to rename in order to simplify and focus our message on exactly what […]

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FindMyPast.co.uk says: “We have just published 42,291 new London Probate Index records on findmypast.co.uk Most of the records are from 1750 to 1858 – although we have around 70 records outside that date range – and they may prove very useful in providing more detail about London ancestors. The records come from the London Probate Index […]

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Deceased online says “A further 105,000 burial records for Aberdeen City have been added to the database. This is in addition to nearly 25,000 burial records for Scotland’s third largest city so this will increase the data size to almost 130,000. The new data is for St Peter’s Cemetery and Churchyard for the period 1830 […]

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Sandy on May 28th, 2011

Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our nation. There are many stories about how it began and over 24 cities have laid claim to being the one to start it off. There is also evidence that women’s organized groups in the South were decorating graves before the end […]

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When archaeologists recovered the first anchor form the wreck of Blackbeard’s flagship Queen Anne’s Revenge in shallow waters off the coast of North Carolina on Friday they determined that plans would need to be changed for further excavation and recovery of the rest of the 300-year-old artifacts located in the central part of the ship. […]

Continue reading about Anchor of Blackbeard’s ship Queen Anne’s Revenge raised off the coast of North Carolina