Library

As part of an effort to create a library collection of George Washington’s favorite reading materials, two books belonging to Washington long held at the National Library of Scotland will soon be returned to Mt Vernon. Alex Salmond, the first minister of Scotland, will soon arrive in the United states to return them. The two […]

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Sandy on March 16th, 2012

Crista Cowan writing on the Ancestry.com blog offers some useful research tips  for people with a little or a lot of Irish in them as follows: “One in eight Americans claim Irish ancestry according to an American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008. That works out to about 36 million people. […]

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An Antarctic search and rescue party discovered the tent of Captain Robert Scott and his two companions on November 12, 1912. They found the body of Scott wedged between those of his team members with the flaps of his sleeping bag and his coat open.  Lt. Henry Bowers and Dr. Edward Wilson lay covered in […]

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For folks who live in the area here’s some useful information about a free genealogy class at  the Lexington Library, North Carolina: “The Lexington Library, at 602 S. Main St., in Lexington, North Carolina, will hold a free class in beginning genealogy during the month of February. The class will be held from 6:30 to […]

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I’m writing about the Carnegie Free Library in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, because I believe that libraries and the services they offer are, instead of diminishing in importance, actually increasing in importance as a resource for people who need them for the host of resources typically offered at libraries. This post refers to an article written by […]

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Charles Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol in 1853. It’s the story about the redemption of a miserly character Ebinezer Scrouge and, Tiny Tim, the crippled son of his is clerk Bob Cratchit. Although it was written in the mid 1800s, story supports an ageless message and not only as a reminder for personal reflection but has […]

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Sandy on December 6th, 2011

When budget cuts are deemed necessary, public libraries and library systems are at the top of the list. It’s hard to understand why, because libraries are an important resource for not only borrowing and research, but also for those who need help to find a job, update their resumes, or send an online job application—most […]

Continue reading about Texas budget cut eliminates a regional library system

The University of St Andrews, founded in 1413, is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English-speaking world. Talented researchers at St Andrews University, have officially launched a new online catalog of books published between the invention of print and the end of the 16th century. The work is the result of over […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s St. Andrews University 10-year treasure hunt leads to world’s first bibliography of the 16th century

An article that appeared in the Lansing Michigan online publication City Pulse described the Library of Michigan’s successful auction of books that were no longer needed. This serves as a reminder that most libraries sell old books at certain times during the year. What the library doesn’t consider essential could be a valuable resource for […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

The following information was posted by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States: “The National Archives just joined iTunes U, a dedicated area within the iTunes Store giving users public access to thousands of free lectures, videos, books and podcasts from learning institutions all over the world.  If you already have iTunes on your […]

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The following information is the latest from the Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) with thanks to Dick Eastman’s EOGN blog for pointing this one out: “Today, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) commemorates the 170th anniversary of the Canada Gazette by making accessible the digitized back issues, from 1841 to 1997, on its website dedicated to this […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

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The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

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Up until a couple of years ago, the basic operations of our libraries hadn’t changed much since philanthropists like Andrew Carnegie donated more than $40,000,000 to build about 1,700 libraries in communities throughout the country. Now, the very existence of our libraries is threatened. Like many businesses, libraries all over the country—if they haven’t been […]

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“The Brooklyn Historical Society’s four-story Queen Anne style building was completed in 1881 and was designed by architect George B. Post. Post’s bold use of extensive terra cotta ornamentation on the façade, and innovative truss system to support the ceiling of the central library, has long been revered by architectural historians.” Plans for interior renovations […]

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Sandy on June 20th, 2011

One of the world’s largest collections of historic books, pamphlets and periodicals housed at the British Library at, 96 Euston Road, London, are to be scanned by Google and made available on the Internet in a deal reached with Google. The deal is to scan 250,000 texts dating back to the 18th century will allow […]

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Wow! my Google alert request actually provided me with current information. The National Library of Scotland (NLS) has invited people to have their say on their Gaelic Language Plan. When I was young, Scottish Gaelic was considered a dead language with only a few people still using it in the west highlands and islands. Although […]

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The World Memory Project was created by The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com, to allow the public free online access to records so that families and victims of the  can discover what happened to their loved ones as a result of one of the worst events in the history of the world. This […]

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I’ve just found a terrific website called Connected Histories I’d like to share that brings together 11 major digital resources related to early modern and nineteenth century Britain (1500-1900), with a single search that allows the sophisticated searching of names places and dates, and the ability to save, connect and even share resources within your […]

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Gale is Celebrating National Library Week from 10-24 April by giving you free access to select Gale resources as follows from NGS: “Gale NewsVault — access to more than 10 million digitized pages. This collection includes: 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers 19th Century British Library Newspapers 19th Century U.S. Newspapers 19th Century UK Periodicals: Empire 19th Century UK Periodicals: New Readerships

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“Nearly 37 Million Americans Claim Irish Ancestry including President Obama and Walt Disney PROVO, UTAH (March 14, 2011) – In recognition of St. Patrick’s Day, Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today launchedThe Irish Collection – the definitive 19thcentury collection of Irish historical records. The collection provides nearly 100 years of insight into life […]

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I’ve written about the merger of the National Archives of Scotland and the General Register Office for Scotland. This is to remind you that as of April 1, the merger will be completed: “From  1 April 2011 the name of the merged NAS-GROS organisation will be the National Records of Scotland (NRS) The strapline  for the new […]

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As we remember the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War (1861-1865), you can explore the history of the conflict and your ancestors’ role in it in ways they (and maybe you) would never have imagined. It’s also known as the War Between the States. Today you can look up the name […]

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A year-long celebration is planned to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of the 40th President of the United States of America, Ronald Wilson Reagan, on February 6, 1911, in Tampico, Illinois. Inaugurated at age 69, Reagan was the oldest President and, according to some of the trivia out there, he was apparently almost […]

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The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Canadian Genealogy Centre is definitely the best place to visit to begin your Canadian family research. Access is free and the website gives clearly points you to where you need to search. I’m sure most of us appreciate websites that manage to provide a wealth of information and yet […]

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When public libraries offer historical documentation online in addition to card catalogue’s this is another sign that they’re starting to get the 21st century big picture aspects of which I’ve covered in my previous article’s More on the subject of CD Books and eBooks and Google launches new eBookstore. The Sylacauga public library now has […]

Continue reading about Alabama’s Avondale Mill archives covering 82 years available at Sylacauga’s public library