National Archives

As readers will see from my blog posts, I’m not a political animal.  Being fully aware of the small reduction percentage resulting from sequestration, is cutting the hours at our National Archives absolutely necessary Mr. President?  Closing the “The People’s House” to visitors too! This line spoken by Marcellus in Shakespeare’s Hamlet seems appropriate, “Something […]

Continue reading about Sequestration reduction of public hours in Washington, DC area

In case you’re interested in the impossible task of predicting Tuesday’s election, the National Archives has launched new interactive Electoral College maps. Many people do not understand the significance of the Electoral College and often debate whether we should go with the popular vote. There are reasons why and the National Archives has also launched […]

Continue reading about You Tube video explains Electoral College process plus new interactive maps from the National Archives

The British National Archives is an amazing online resource. The latest addition to their collection is a project titled “Asia through a lens”. The collection is made up of more than 35,000 photographs, sketches and drawings from across the British Empire and offers a unique insight into life in the colonies from the second half […]

Continue reading about British National Archives has released online early images of Asia

The National Archives has launched new online videos of its most popular genealogy “how to” workshops. The Know Your Records series is a “how to” in creation, content and use of records created by the federal government. The videos cover “hot topics” in genealogical research such as Civil War records, online resources and databases, etc. […]

Continue reading about Know Your Records series on the National Archives YouTube channel

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has recently published an updated Open Government Plan for 2012-2014 designed to guide their efforts “in transparency, participation, and collaboration”. Although I can’t agree with the transparency, participation, and collaboration mantra for all government organizations, I believe that NARA always puts its best foot forward. Unlike some other […]

Continue reading about National Archives and Records Administration agenda for 2012-2014

The Scots have a rare humor when it comes to death and if you’ve heard some to the irreverent Scottish jokes about the subject you’d understand. Don’t get wrong my generation also had a healthy respect for the dead. We always enjoyed those visits to the cemetery on Sunday’s, which usually included a walk around […]

Continue reading about Ten source documents family historians and genealogists need for death records

The British National Archives has made Olympic and Paralympic documents and images available online for the 19th 20th and 21st centuries. This is a first. The new site called The Olympic Record has a timeline, which enables researchers to brows material from summer Olympics from the Athens games in 1896 to the Beijing games in 2008. […]

Continue reading about Olympic and Paralympic records now available online at British National Archives

The following is an announcement from the National Archives and Records Administration regarding a new Microfilm Research Room: “A new Microfilm Research Room is scheduled to open on Monday, May 21, 2012, in the Robert M. Warner Research Center in the National Archives Building, Washington, DC. It will house 27 researcher carrels, 5 public use […]

Continue reading about New Microfilm Research Room set to open at the National Archives on May 21

Wills are a wonderful source of information for family historians and genealogy researchers. They provide an amazing peep into your ancestor’s world. The information found in wills usually includes details, such as, where the person who died lived and the name of the executor who is the person responsible for carrying out the wishes of […]

Continue reading about Researching wills at the UK National Archives including last testaments of the famous

It wasn’t so long ago that I heard the warnings at work to embrace and learn new processes with comments like, “Unless you embrace the new technologies and a new way of performing tasks, you’re bound to be looking for a new job.”  This turned out to be true. As you can well imagine, too […]

Continue reading about The National Archives of the United States understands the use of social media

Document preservation is serious business whether it be your own personal records or our National Archives. You might know, in comparison  to most of our efforts, the national archives wins hands-down. The following press release from the National Archives takes viewers inside their state-of-the-art preservation lab where you’ll see a series of videos which demonstrates […]

Continue reading about New National Archives Video provides a look inside their Preservation Lab

Sandy on March 16th, 2012

Crista Cowan writing on the Ancestry.com blog offers some useful research tips  for people with a little or a lot of Irish in them as follows: “One in eight Americans claim Irish ancestry according to an American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008. That works out to about 36 million people. […]

Continue reading about Everybody has a little Irish in them

The British National Archives has revised and made available for online research, the Manorial Documents Register for Gloucestershire, England. The records still have legal relevance today, safeguarding rights and defining privileges. They give wonderful insight into the lives of ordinary people in the Middle Ages. Records have been identified as far afield as Utah in […]

Continue reading about Updated Manorial Documents Register for Gloucestershire, England, available online

The British National Archives is now offering researchers the ability to download the Royal Naval Seaman service records. It’s another resource to add to your list of places to look for your ancestors.  I can  recommend this database because I was lucky enough to find someone to add to my family history records online from […]

Continue reading about Search Royal Naval Seamen (1853 – 1923) online at the National Archives UK

The following is an update from England’s findmypast.com that is guaranteed to reveal a lot of interesting surprises and some humor for family history researchers: “The final, missing column of data from the 1911 census, which details individuals’ infirmities is today released for the very first time at  www.findmypast.co.uk and www.1911census.co.uk, the family history websites which first […]

Continue reading about 1911 census previously hidden infirmities column now available in well-known UK genealogy database

The British Newspaper Archive officially launched their vast resources today. They have a lot of activities planned for today so if, like me you don’t live in London you can still follow on Facebook, You Tube, or click on the link to the website: “Today is the launch day for the British Newspaper Archive –www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk – […]

Continue reading about Official launch of the British Newspaper Archive a Digital Sheherazade…

The British National Archives is offering a series of podcasts titled Voices of the Armistice podcast series bringing to life the individual experiences of those who served in WWI. These free podcasts express the individual perspective of servicemen and women and highlight some of the unusual and interesting stories found in military records. The narrated recordings […]

Continue reading about Free podcasts marking the 90th anniversary of Armistice

A few days ago I recorded information on SpittalStreet.com about access to nursing records from Findmypast. Today I can share the following notice I received from the British National Archives regarding the publication of WWI nursing service records. At the same time I can offer the reminder that the National Archives is a tremendous resource: […]

Continue reading about Nursing Service Records go online at British National Archives

Sandy on September 29th, 2011

The following information was posted by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States: “The National Archives just joined iTunes U, a dedicated area within the iTunes Store giving users public access to thousands of free lectures, videos, books and podcasts from learning institutions all over the world.  If you already have iTunes on your […]

Continue reading about Connect with Us on iTunes U

Sandy on September 20th, 2011

 On September 19, 1881, President James Garfield died, after surviving for nearly three months, from a close range gunshot wound inflicted by Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled job seeker. This was the final success of several previous attempts to shoot the President and Guiteau finally managed mortally wound the President with a pearl-handled pistol as he […]

Continue reading about The 1881 assassination of President Garfield

Sandy on August 8th, 2011

From the UK National Archives: “To celebrate the centenary of the 1911 census, The National Archives is holding a one-day conference, Celebrating the Census, on 1 October. Places are limited and are available on a first come first served basis, so book early to guarantee your place. You could also win two tickets for the conference […]

Continue reading about Celebrate the centennial of the UK 1911 census

Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

Continue reading about UK National Archives launches new library catalog

Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

As of Monday, June 6th, when you make copies in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) research rooms in the Washington, area they will be printed on Windsor Blue paper. This is being done to help delineate which papers were copied on NARA equipment or printed at one of the public use PC printers […]

Continue reading about Why so blue?

On May 5, NARA and five national and international research organizations met in Washington DC to launch a new international research portal for records related to Nazi-era cultural properties. The purpose of the project is to extend public access to the records through a single internet portal. This includes access to descriptions and digitized copies […]

Continue reading about Global catalogue of Nazi-looted art records published online for family researchers and historians

blog.findmypast.co.uk  says: “Findmypast.co.uk has always had the most comprehensive England & Wales birth and marriage records – now we’ve added our exclusive additional records to create one simple search. As well as England & Wales records, you can now search for your British ancestors’ births and marriages in our overseas, military and at sea records, some […]

Continue reading about A single search for all births and marriages from findmypast.com.uk

Sandy on April 22nd, 2011

Six documents were declassified last week as part of the work of the National Declassification Center (NDC), regarding  secret writing as described in the documentation. The NDC was established within the National Archives at the direction of the President in 2009 with the task of reviewing more than 400 million pages of records by year […]

Continue reading about CIA declassifies six secret writing documents

“Bloomsbury Publishing has announced that it has purchased the backlist of The National Archives’ publications and has agreed to co-publish a range of forthcoming titles. The backlist covers the full range of adult trade titles along with academic works. These include the best-selling titles Genealogists’ Internet by Peter Christian and The UFO Files by Dr […]

Continue reading about Bloomsbury Publishing acquires The National Archives’ UK publications list

The following is a press release from Ancestry.com “Nearly 25 million National Archives Civil War records documenting lives and service of Union and Confederate soldiers available free to public at Ancestry.com from April 7-14 WASHINGTON, D.C., and PROVO, UTAH — (April 6, 2011) – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, and the National Archives, […]

Continue reading about Millions of Civil War records released online for the first time by Ancestry.com and the National Archives to honor the 150th anniversary

“The 26th release of files from the Security Service MI5 reveals secret plans including assassination plots and use of poisons after the Second World War. This release contains 180 files, bringing the total of Secret Service files at The National Archives to 4,725. Many of the files are available at DocumentsOnline. You can download them for […]

Continue reading about MI5 releases and 180 files to the UK National Archives including assassination plots and use of poisons

The following copied from the National Archives and Records Administration website to help spread the word  about a media conference scheduled by the NARA to take place on April 12. The discussion is one on how technology could improve access to government information for all. It’s  free and open to the public but registration is required. […]

Continue reading about NARA-Media Access to Government Information Conference (MAGIC)

Oliver Morley the new Chief Executive Officer at the National Archives of the United Kingdom has launched the new Business Plan for 2011-2015. It’s called For the Record. For Good and lays out the National Archives for the next four years. The plan is to address the need for innovation and transformation of the organization […]

Continue reading about New CEO at National Archives UK launches new business plan

I’m a big fan of Wikipedia and so is David Ferriero, 10th Archivist of the United States. That’s an impressive endorsement. Most of us have discovered that it’s usually the first place to go for information to get started on research.  According to a recent Pew Internet report, with about 53% of all Internet-connected using its […]

Continue reading about Wikipedia Celebrates 10 years and the Archivist of the United States has student job opening for 2011

We are bombarded with so much data these days that we’re apt to overlook some excellent sources of genealogical information. One of these is the passport application. Would you believe, the U.S. Department of State has issued passports to people traveling abroad since 1789, although it didn’t have the authority to do so until Congress […]

Continue reading about Passport applications an excellent source of genealogy information

Sandy on January 11th, 2011

“Today’s Document” is the name given to the newly released first mobile application based on the “popular feature” on Archives.gov. It’s an interactive gallery that gives you access to explore the holdings of the US National Archives through 365 fascinating documents and photographs thorough history. If you want to learn what happened on your birthday, […]

Continue reading about Social media and web 2.0 at the National Archives!