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My favorite research starting point Wikipedia has plans to black out its English language site for 24 hours in an effort to seek support against the proposed U.S anti-piracy legislation that will threaten the future of the Internet. Wikipedia is the highest profile name to join an ever growing protest starting midnight January 18 to […]

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The following is a news release from Ancestry.com which shows an interesting and optimistic trend not only for Ancestry but also for enthusiastic family history researchers:   “PROVO, Utah, Jan. 5, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today reported that it ended the fourth quarter with 1,703,000 […]

Continue reading about Start the new year right Ancestry.com has 1.7 million subscribers mid to high teens are catching on too

CeCe Moore who writes the Your Genetic Genealogist blog and Richard Hill of DNA Testing Adviser have both drawn attention to somewhat duplicitous Terms of Service (TOS) changes for v3 customers at well-known genetic testing company 23andMe. I would certainly take note of the censure since both Moore and Hill are known for giving sage advice […]

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Sandy on December 31st, 2011

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards:

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To make sure that Ancestry.com met customer requirements, they asked users what they could do to make their research goals better. Based on the response, they put together a list of 12 improvements Ancestry will implement in 2012 as follows: “1. Announcing the 1940 U.S. Federal Census — the 72-year wait is over! The long-awaited […]

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If you’ve been researching your family tree you’ll understand the kind of connection you make with your ancestors. They become real people who lived real lives and how they handled with the cards they were dealt. The more you find out the more you want to understand how they lived and felt about special occasions […]

Continue reading about A writing site for the average person to record life experiences for future generations

For years it has been said that the shroud of Turin is a fake, now scientists have found evidence that it could after all be authentic. And, let’s face the fact that we will always have the believers, the non-believers, those who want it to be a fake no matter what, and those who are […]

Continue reading about New scientific evidence: The image on the shroud of Turin created by a flash of electromagnetic energy

From various historical sources, Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) is thought to be one of the most controversial figures in British history. Cromwell was considered a regicidal (murderer of a monarch) a dictator by some and a hero of liberty by others and his almost genocidal activities against Catholics in Scotland […]

Continue reading about British National Archives records reveal Christmas was once canceled

Sandy on December 16th, 2011

It’s almost time for the RootsTech again. So, what is RootsTech? It’s a conference for genealogists who meet to find cutting edges solutions and discover the latest technologies to enhance their research experience. On the techies side developers will gain information to produce innovative applications. RootsTech has something for everyone even if you’re a newbie […]

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Hot on the heals of my article yesterday titled, Social Security Death Index (SSDI) no longer available to the public  about the denial of access to SSDI, I’m passing along worthwhile commentary published on Dick Eastman’s, Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, Genealogists are Losing Access to SSDI, Mostly Due to Misinformation, detailing a very interesting point of view regarding this loss […]

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I had this article prepared and ready to go yesterday and it’s almost old news by now, but still front-page information. A significant change has been made by the Social Security Administration (SSA) that will change the amount of information available to the public on the SSA’s Death Master File starting around 1936 with the […]

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It’s not easy to trace Irish ancestors, I can attest to that. An interesting new Facebook page “How to Trace Your Ancestors” has just been launched to lend a hand to people around the world to find their Irish and American ancestors. The page is a how to on tracing your family history with tips, […]

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More than 400 Navajos served as top-secret Code Talkers in the military during World War II. At a time when the best cryptographers fell short of the mark, these modest people successfully contrived the most ingenious and successful code in military history and it completely baffled the Japanese. The unbreakable code played a central part […]

Continue reading about Inspiring interview: World War II Navajo Code Talker Chester Nez

Ancestry. com the worlds largest online family history resource has released two million North Carolina World War II Draft Cards in commemoration of the seventieth anniversary of Pearl Harbor on December 7th as follows: “In remembrance of the upcoming 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor marking the entrance of the United States into World […]

Continue reading about Detailed info on North Carolinians including Billy Graham, Andy Griffith and Ralph Earnhardt free through December 7

Sandy on December 1st, 2011

From the Society of Genealogists (UK): “The IGRS has issued the following press release and I have to say the the Society of Genealogists most definitely shares their worries: The Irish Genealogical Research Society (ITGRS) is concerned that a so-called merger of the National Archives “into” the National Library could diminish these vital heritage services. […]

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St. Andrews is the Patron Saint of Scotland and although widely celebrated every year on November 30th in Scotland every year since the 6th century, St. Andrew’s Day isn’t recognized as a public holiday. There are about 40 million people throughout the world who claim Scottish descent so, as you can well imagine, there’s a […]

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Hot off the press: The following is a newsflash released today from Ancestry.com about their new mobile app that gives users the ability to access billions of historical records to build their new family tree:  “PROVO, Utah, Nov. 29, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced the […]

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The British Newspaper Archive officially launched their vast resources today. They have a lot of activities planned for today so if, like me you don’t live in London you can still follow on Facebook, You Tube, or click on the link to the website: “Today is the launch day for the British Newspaper Archive –www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk – […]

Continue reading about Official launch of the British Newspaper Archive a Digital Sheherazade…

Although genealogist and family historians use more than one service, Google still reigns as the most popular. To keep you up-to-date on changes going forward, Urs Hölzle Senior Vice President, Operations & Google Fellow, has written an article on changes you can expect to see going forward. Google is in the process of shutting down […]

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Sandy on November 26th, 2011

The British Newspaper Archive has a Facebook page where you can read some interesting entries including some of the classic writers, assassination attempts on Queen Victoria, etc. Here’s a copy of their recent blog post with links to Facebook and Twitter– You can also sign up for their newsletter as follows: “To give people some […]

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Here’s a newsflash from Enhanced Online News (EON): “PROVO, Utah & LONDON & TEL AVIV, Israel–(EON: Enhanced Online News)–MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, announced today the acquisition of FamilyLink.com, Inc., maker of the family history content sites FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com. This is MyHeritage’s seventh and largest acquisition since 2007. The purchase marks a […]

Continue reading about MyHeritage Acquires FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com a significant U.S. market move

Sandy on November 20th, 2011

The following information appeared on the Google Blog and will be interesting for Genealogists and Historians, et cetera: “Did you know that every single major league baseball team has a Google+ page? Or that hundreds of professors across the country are using Google+ to hold virtual office hours? Or that every U.S. presidential primary candidate has agreed to […]

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Here’s the latest information from Ancestry.com about their Advanced Image Viewer: “Several years ago, we launched the Advanced Image Viewer. This viewer provided some much-needed capabilities and was welcomed by the users who could take advantage of it. Our other users – almost 50% of our total user base – continued to use a basic […]

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Sandy on November 16th, 2011

Prenuptial agreements 300 years old have been unearthed by an archivist in the state archive of Bückeburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. To be exact, 5500 contracts between 1712 and 1740 have been registered. The administrative district of Stadthagen is represented with 1600 prenuptial agreements (Eheberedungen). The information on these prenuptial agreements is discussed in a FamilySearch.org […]

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Sandy on November 13th, 2011

This week’s GenealogyInTime Magazine newsletter passed on an important tip for family historians that is very often overlooked during research and cause those  brick walls to rise and leave you stymied after you’ve been on a roll: “Looking at historical records, it is not always easy to identify an ancestor who has been married more […]

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Today is Veteran’s Day, I’d like to share this blog post from the NARations blog, you can also find a link on my Blogroll: “At the National Archives, you never know who will come in to do some research.  A few weeks ago, the Still Pictures and Motion Pictures research rooms hosted about 30 Vietnam […]

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Sandy on November 10th, 2011

As you’ll see from the following news release from findmypast, England’s county of Cheshire is famous for more than the delicious cheese: “CHESHIRE REVEALED AS A WONDERLAND OF UNUSUAL FINDS AS NEW LOCAL RECORDS GO ONLINE Lewis Carroll’s baptism found in Daresbury,11 July 1832 Earthquake hit Cheshire on 18 March 1612 Ancestors of James Bond […]

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I’ve just read a wonderful and amusing essay written by Drew Moore published in The Fortnightly Review and titled “Genealogy in America”. (The original Fortnightly Review was one of the most important and influential magazines in nineteenth-century. This New Fortnightly Review in the age of technology is a fascinating discovery.) The essay/article describes how Mr. […]

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Sandy on November 4th, 2011

The following is a very welcome newsflash from FamilySearch.org: “We have received word that the Hugh Wallis site is working again. Thanks to the good work of Hugh Wallis, John Steel and others, the site is once again up and available for you to use. To some, the new format used on the site may […]

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The British National Archives is offering a series of podcasts titled Voices of the Armistice podcast series bringing to life the individual experiences of those who served in WWI. These free podcasts express the individual perspective of servicemen and women and highlight some of the unusual and interesting stories found in military records. The narrated recordings […]

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A few days ago I recorded information on SpittalStreet.com about access to nursing records from Findmypast. Today I can share the following notice I received from the British National Archives regarding the publication of WWI nursing service records. At the same time I can offer the reminder that the National Archives is a tremendous resource: […]

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Sandy on November 2nd, 2011

Here’s another useful resource for family history researchers passed along by the National Genealogical Society (NGS): “The Georgia Historic Newspapers Collection (part of the Digital Library of Georgia) has a nice South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive. The South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive spans the years 1845-1922 and includes the following titles: Albany News, 1870-1883 Albany Patriot, 1845-1866 Americus Times Recorder, […]

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Findmypast.co.uk is a terrific resource for family history research. It has a simple and easy-to-use interface. I do like the development of their database and they’re constantly adding new resources. The latest addition is  as follows:  “You can now search for your ancestors in 4,000 records for military nurses on findmypast.co.uk The records cover the […]

Continue reading about Military Nurses 1856-1940 records published at Findmypast

I’d like an following  blog post written by David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, on the very important issue of “Releasing All We Can, Protecting What We Must.”: “In early October President Obama signed an Executive Order (EO) covering “Structural Reforms to Improve the Security of Classified Networks and the Responsible Sharing and Safeguarding of Classified […]

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Sandy on October 30th, 2011

An interesting newsflash from ScotlandsPeople: “The census street index books for the main towns and cities in Scotland have been digitised for each of the open census years. These books can make it easier to find the registration district and enumeration book details for an address. The streets are arranged alphabetically and the bookmarks allow […]

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For all family history researchers the following information from the UK Society of Genealogists will be useful: “As family historians know, the General Register Office for England and Wales (GRO) provides free public access to the index of events for birth,marriage,death, civil partnership, adoption and overseas records. This information is made available in microfiche format […]

Continue reading about GRO fiche index location changes – Newcastle replaces LMA from 28 october

I’d like to share yesterday’s post by Diane L. Richard on the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Blog. As I’ve mentioned many times on this blog NGS is a tremendous resource for anyone interested in family history research.  This particular blog post is about JSTOR, which is a service provided by a non-profit organization called  ITHAKA. […]

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Sandy on October 25th, 2011

Here we go again. The English claim that they invented the game of soccer (called football in the UK) in 1848 when students at Cambridge University formulated the first set of rules. Not so fast England. According to the UKs Daily Record newspaper experts at the Scottish Foodball Museum at Hampden (Hampden Park near Glasgow […]

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Sandy on October 24th, 2011

Tanya  Peterson, technology guru at Ancestry.com, published this useful article on the Ancestry blog today. I have Family Tree Maker 2012 and the following post on charting has helped me: “Over the years, we have received requests to include some charting features that were available in Family Tree Maker 2006/version 16. In Family Tree Maker […]

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According to an article in the Irish Times written by science editor Dick Ahlstrom, geneticists have teamed up to attempt to root out what it means to be truly Irish. The plan is to map families to their ancestral homes and focus on subtle genetic differences between hailing from Bantry as opposed to Ballinasloe. Details […]

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Sandy on October 23rd, 2011

Did you notice what happened this week  at Ancestry.com? They released over 50 databases containing indexes to millions of vital records from all over the United States. Some of these records date all the way back the 1600s and the most recent of them are from last year. (You can find the complete list by viewing our recently added […]

Continue reading about More Ancestry.com Births, Marriages and Deaths…

I’m sure most of us have found some conflicting information during our family history research. Here’s some sage advice from FamilySearch.org: “Conflicting information from original documents can be troublesome, which means it is always wise to use more than one document when proving family connections. Take the case of Bessie Endy. Or, was she Bessie […]

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Sandy on October 18th, 2011

Here’s the latest news from FamilySearch.org: “The East India Office Company had many people employed in their trade empire in India and Asia. Because of all the activity they were engaged in, the East India Company generated a vast collection of historical records. The records were created by individual government divisions called “presidencies.” These presidencies […]

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The Lawson McGhee Library in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, commemorates its 125th anniversary this month and throughout October. The festivities begin by embracing the future in a very big way. There’s been a lot published recently about the waning  importance of public libraries as bastions of knowledge due to the Internet the digitization of books, and […]

Continue reading about Innovative 125-year old Knoxville Tennessee library embraces the future as well as the past…

Being a member of The National Genealogical Association (NGS) is a real learning experience and a fountainhead  of information for anyone interested in family history research and genealogy.  A few days ago NGS  announced the appointment of  Teresa Koch-Bostic of Mineola, New York, to the Board of Directors. Terry is a professional genealogist who specializes […]

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Sandy on October 15th, 2011

If you’re leery of downloading toolbars this one isn’t an advertisement. Tami  Glatz has created and shared  a  toolbar on LinkedIn that works with all browsers and its FREE. It’s all handy links for online genealogy researchers! Tami’s constantly adding more great sites – most  are free.  I’ve downloaded it myself and can assure you […]

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As a child I loved A.A. Milne’s Winnie the Pooh especially “The House at Pooh Corner”. I also loved the smell of those books with their shiny paper (I don’t know if this was significant, but I’m okay). Today is Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday and to commemorate his author A. A. Milne, Findmypast.co.uk has […]

Continue reading about AA Milne in Findmypast records on Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday

Sandy on October 14th, 2011

“You can now search 10,529 records of WWII Escapers & Evaders on findmypast.co.uk These records are individual reports for allied service personnel about their experiences of escaping from prisoner of war camps or evading capture in Central Europe throughout WWII. Each entry will tell you the following key information about your ancestor: name, rank, number, […]

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Sandy on October 14th, 2011

UK family history site Genes Reunited have added the following Parish records to their growing record collection: “ Today sees the launch of over 35 million baptism, marriage and burial records for England and Wales dating back to 1538. Parish records are an important source for family historians allowing them to trace their ancestors back further […]

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Here’s the latest from Deceased Online: “After conducting research and finding the cemetery, churchyard or burial ground where an ancestor is buried, many family historians are frustrated that they cannot find the plot or even a rough location for their ancestor’s last resting place. And on a cold, wet Tuesday afternoon in February there is […]

Continue reading about Maps of cemeteries and burial grounds in Angus, Scotland

Sandy on October 10th, 2011

“Columbus Day is a U.S. holiday that commemorates the landing of Christopher Columbus in the New World on October 12, 1492. It was unofficially celebrated in a number of cities and states as early as the 18th century but did not become a federal holiday until the 1937. For many, the holiday is a way […]

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Sandy on October 7th, 2011

Findmypast UK says: “We have just published more than 730,000 new Berkshire parish records on findmypast.co.uk These new records will be a great help to anyone trying to trace their Berkshire ancestors. Berkshire Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records. Further details of this release are as follows: Type of records Number of records Date range […]

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Personal Historian 2 is finally launched. The press release is as follows: “SPRINGVILLE, Utah. — September 28, 2011 — RootsMagic, Inc. today announced the official release of Personal Historian 2, the latest version of the ground-breaking computer software which helps you write the story of your life and of other individuals.  Personal Historian breaks this seemingly […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Here’s some information from Ancestry.com about today’s release of Family Tree Maker 2012, which provides you with a description of the improvements made in this latest upgrade. If you’d like to purchase it,  you can click on the graphic above and it’ll take you to where you need to go… “Ancestry.com announced the release of […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

The following information was posted by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States: “The National Archives just joined iTunes U, a dedicated area within the iTunes Store giving users public access to thousands of free lectures, videos, books and podcasts from learning institutions all over the world.  If you already have iTunes on your […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “This week was a happy dance week for those of us with Irish roots.  Ancestry.com has posted indexes to Irish Civil Registrations which began in 1864 for births,  marriages, and deaths (1845 for non-Catholic marriages). In addition there is an index to births and baptisms that dates back to 1620, extracted from a variety of records. Three other collections that […]

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Three months after the largest wildfire ever recorded on New Mexico state records, the National Parks Service (NPS) has reopened sections of the Bandelier National Monument to visitors. “The fire which began on June 26, burned over 60% of the park and altered much of the park landscape.” The visitor center, which contained the largest […]

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The following information is the latest from the Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) with thanks to Dick Eastman’s EOGN blog for pointing this one out: “Today, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) commemorates the 170th anniversary of the Canada Gazette by making accessible the digitized back issues, from 1841 to 1997, on its website dedicated to this […]

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Thanks to a partnership between the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and Google, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest known biblical manuscripts, are now available online in high-resolution format. The manuscripts, so fragile that they can’t be exposed to direct light, were discovered between 1947 and 1956 in caves along the shores of the Dean Sea, and […]

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Here’s the latest release of records from Findmypast.co.uk: “MANCHESTER ‘BAD BOYS’ REVEALED IN CITY ARCHIVE RECORDS RELEASED ONLINE Manchester prison and workhouse records included Charges include: indecent relations with a pig, and driving a contagious cow along a highway Victorian law and order likely to have punished today’s rioters more severely First execution listed at […]

Continue reading about Findmypast.co.uk publishes 1.3 million Manchester family history records, including prison and school registers

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) has recently launched a beautiful website dedicated to Native American ancestry titled Trace Indian Ancestry offering helpful tips and information on researching the genealogy of your Native American ancestors: “To determine if you are eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, contact the tribe, or tribes, you […]

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The National Library of Ireland is investigating a situation regarding a cache of more than 400,000 records released by a UK genealogy company infringes on its legal rights to the microfilms behind the records. Ancestry.com.uk published more than 40 million Irish birth, marriage and death records. According to the Irish Times, the files consist of […]

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Sandy on September 23rd, 2011

Slot canyons can be found in many parts of the world, mainly in areas with low rainfall. Some of the most well-known slot canyons can be found in the Southwestern United States, in the Pyrenees bordering France and Spain, the Sierra de Guara in northern Spain and, as headlined in this post, in the Blue […]

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Sandy on September 22nd, 2011

Most of us realize that the Internet has changed family history research and a recent article in Desert News online describes how the next five years will accelerate the process making it more affordable and rewarding. The article “Family history in the future” was written by Paul Allen the famed co-founder and CEO of Ancestry.com […]

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Sandy on September 20th, 2011

 On September 19, 1881, President James Garfield died, after surviving for nearly three months, from a close range gunshot wound inflicted by Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled job seeker. This was the final success of several previous attempts to shoot the President and Guiteau finally managed mortally wound the President with a pearl-handled pistol as he […]

Continue reading about The 1881 assassination of President Garfield