Project

The 1940 census has caused quite a stir in the genealogy and family history community. I’ve written about it several times with progress updates and I thought it has just about been covered by everyone.Wait up! there’s more. The fact that 1940 census has had amazing coverage in national publications is truly impressive. The best […]

Continue reading about The pre-war 1940 U.S. census is a factual gold mine for family historians

The following news release from Ancestry.com and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum World Memory Project marks the first anniversary of their partnership. There are three new collections including information on Poles, Jews, and other victims with more than 1.3 million records indexed from the museum’s archives: “WASHINGTON, DC/PROVO, UTAH, May 10, 2012 — Records […]

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Sandy on May 2nd, 2012

Kathryn Rudy, a lecturer in the School of Art History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, has analyzed some 15th and early 16th-century European prayer books. The point of the study was to learn the reading habits of people who lived in medieval times and turned out to be a kind of forensic analysis […]

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The following information regarding the indexing of 1940 census was posted by Ancestry.coma: “What a difference a week makes. Since the National Archives released the 1940 Census to us last Monday, we’ve been hard at work to get every one of the 3.8 million 1940 Census images online. And while we were at it, we […]

Continue reading about 1940 Census: Ancestry.com has Nevada and Delaware indexed and online

Thanks to a partnership between the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and Google, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest known biblical manuscripts, are now available online in high-resolution format. The manuscripts, so fragile that they can’t be exposed to direct light, were discovered between 1947 and 1956 in caves along the shores of the Dean Sea, and […]

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Most of us have used Wikipedia, “the world’s largest and most popular encyclopedia” as a launching pad for research on every subject under the sun. Much to my surprise, I discovered that Wikipedia is part of a much larger organization called Wikimedia. So, what is Wikimedia? “The Wikimedia Foundation,  Inc. is a nonprofit charitable organization […]

Continue reading about Wikimedia resources plus new links to NARA’s online catalog

The World Memory Project was created by The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com, to allow the public free online access to records so that families and victims of the  can discover what happened to their loved ones as a result of one of the worst events in the history of the world. This […]

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Stirling Castle, once the home of Kings and Queens of Scotland, and one of the country’s favorite tourist spots, has recently completed a project to recreate colorful oak carvings in the Royal Palace, of King James V, within the castle. The project cost  £12 million Pounds Sterling  ($19,108,882.86 USD). The original ceiling, which once held […]

Continue reading about Magnificent “Stirling Heads” project completed in the royal palace of James V at Stirling Castle in Scotland

As a current member of findmypast.com, I’m always happy to pass along any information that will help make a worthwhile project successful: “The Federation of Family History Societies is carrying out a new and exciting transcription project to help trace missing ancestors, in partnership with findmypast.co.uk: the Lost Ancestors project. The FFHS would like to […]

Continue reading about Help wanted: The Federation of Family History Societies (FFHS) new project with findmypast.co.uk