Records

The Lawson McGhee Library in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, commemorates its 125th anniversary this month and throughout October. The festivities begin by embracing the future in a very big way. There’s been a lot published recently about the waning  importance of public libraries as bastions of knowledge due to the Internet the digitization of books, and […]

Continue reading about Innovative 125-year old Knoxville Tennessee library embraces the future as well as the past…

As a child I loved A.A. Milne’s Winnie the Pooh especially “The House at Pooh Corner”. I also loved the smell of those books with their shiny paper (I don’t know if this was significant, but I’m okay). Today is Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday and to commemorate his author A. A. Milne, Findmypast.co.uk has […]

Continue reading about AA Milne in Findmypast records on Winnie the Pooh’s 85th birthday

Sandy on October 14th, 2011

“You can now search 10,529 records of WWII Escapers & Evaders on findmypast.co.uk These records are individual reports for allied service personnel about their experiences of escaping from prisoner of war camps or evading capture in Central Europe throughout WWII. Each entry will tell you the following key information about your ancestor: name, rank, number, […]

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Sandy on October 14th, 2011

UK family history site Genes Reunited have added the following Parish records to their growing record collection: “ Today sees the launch of over 35 million baptism, marriage and burial records for England and Wales dating back to 1538. Parish records are an important source for family historians allowing them to trace their ancestors back further […]

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Here’s the latest from Deceased Online: “After conducting research and finding the cemetery, churchyard or burial ground where an ancestor is buried, many family historians are frustrated that they cannot find the plot or even a rough location for their ancestor’s last resting place. And on a cold, wet Tuesday afternoon in February there is […]

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Sandy on October 7th, 2011

Findmypast UK says: “We have just published more than 730,000 new Berkshire parish records on findmypast.co.uk These new records will be a great help to anyone trying to trace their Berkshire ancestors. Berkshire Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records. Further details of this release are as follows: Type of records Number of records Date range […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Here’s some information from Ancestry.com about today’s release of Family Tree Maker 2012, which provides you with a description of the improvements made in this latest upgrade. If you’d like to purchase it,  you can click on the graphic above and it’ll take you to where you need to go… “Ancestry.com announced the release of […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

The following information was posted by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States: “The National Archives just joined iTunes U, a dedicated area within the iTunes Store giving users public access to thousands of free lectures, videos, books and podcasts from learning institutions all over the world.  If you already have iTunes on your […]

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Sandy on September 29th, 2011

Ancestry.com says: “This week was a happy dance week for those of us with Irish roots.  Ancestry.com has posted indexes to Irish Civil Registrations which began in 1864 for births,  marriages, and deaths (1845 for non-Catholic marriages). In addition there is an index to births and baptisms that dates back to 1620, extracted from a variety of records. Three other collections that […]

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The following information is the latest from the Library and Archives of Canada (LAC) with thanks to Dick Eastman’s EOGN blog for pointing this one out: “Today, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) commemorates the 170th anniversary of the Canada Gazette by making accessible the digitized back issues, from 1841 to 1997, on its website dedicated to this […]

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Thanks to a partnership between the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and Google, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest known biblical manuscripts, are now available online in high-resolution format. The manuscripts, so fragile that they can’t be exposed to direct light, were discovered between 1947 and 1956 in caves along the shores of the Dean Sea, and […]

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Here’s the latest release of records from Findmypast.co.uk: “MANCHESTER ‘BAD BOYS’ REVEALED IN CITY ARCHIVE RECORDS RELEASED ONLINE Manchester prison and workhouse records included Charges include: indecent relations with a pig, and driving a contagious cow along a highway Victorian law and order likely to have punished today’s rioters more severely First execution listed at […]

Continue reading about Findmypast.co.uk publishes 1.3 million Manchester family history records, including prison and school registers

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) has recently launched a beautiful website dedicated to Native American ancestry titled Trace Indian Ancestry offering helpful tips and information on researching the genealogy of your Native American ancestors: “To determine if you are eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, contact the tribe, or tribes, you […]

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The National Library of Ireland is investigating a situation regarding a cache of more than 400,000 records released by a UK genealogy company infringes on its legal rights to the microfilms behind the records. Ancestry.com.uk published more than 40 million Irish birth, marriage and death records. According to the Irish Times, the files consist of […]

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Sandy on September 20th, 2011

 On September 19, 1881, President James Garfield died, after surviving for nearly three months, from a close range gunshot wound inflicted by Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled job seeker. This was the final success of several previous attempts to shoot the President and Guiteau finally managed mortally wound the President with a pearl-handled pistol as he […]

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FamilySearch.org says: “FamilySearch.org added millions of new records this week including 11 new records collections. More than six million Hungary Catholic Church records were added, as well as four million Mexico civil registration records. Looking for records from China? Over a million new Chinese genealogies from 1500–1900 are now available for viewing. Begin searching for free at FamilySearch.org. Searchable records on FamilySearch.org are […]

Continue reading about Records from China, Hungary, Mexico and U.S. Collections added on FamilySearch.orgH

Sandy on September 16th, 2011

Search for free in honor of Mexican Independence Day.  Paul Rawlins on Ancestry.com blog says: “One thing I learned as we launched the 1930 Mexico Census online is that Mexico is much more of a melting pot than I realized. Mexico’s 1930 national census (“El Quinto Censo General de Población y Vivienda 1930, México”) is called the […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

If you’ve been gathering your family history records over the years you will by now recognize the importance of records preservation. With this problem in mind, I suggest that you read a paper written by Gary T. Wright which is available on the FamilySearch.org website. It’s excellent and answers some of my own questions. Since […]

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Sandy on September 12th, 2011

The following is a news flash from Deceased Online:  “Deceased Online has a large stand at the Scottish Association of Family History Societies (SAFHS) annual conference, Adam House, Chambers Street, Edinburgh. You can meet some of our dedicated Scottish team on 25th June where we’ll be unveiling 400,000 Scottish burial and cremation records new to […]

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Because of the changing needs of its customers, the National Library of Scotland (NLS) has plans in the works to update and develop services and functions for the 21st century. As one of the major research libraries in Europe, Scotland NLS is the only legal deposit library that has a copy anything published in the […]

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Sandy on September 7th, 2011

Another reminder from the National Genealogical Society (NGS): “This is such an exciting project for genealogists that we want to remind you about it. As the War of 1812 pensions are being digitized (see previous posts below and check out this FGS page) they are freely available to all at the Fold3 (previously Footnote) website. Currently about 69,000 […]

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“For immediate release  AYE AYE CAPTAIN – MERCHANT NAVY ARCHIVES REVEAL PHOTOS OF UK’S FORGOTTEN ‘FOURTH SERVICE’ Churchill’s ‘fourth service’ who helped to make Britain ‘Great’ Fascinating photos of British merchant mariners from 100 years ago A ‘floating United Nations’, women and men, young boys, ‘donkeymen’ and manicurists, as well as personal descriptions such as […]

Continue reading about 1 million Merchant Navy Seamen records published by findmypast today – many include photos!

Sandy on August 31st, 2011

FamilySearch.org has added the following records to it’s enormous database: “Austria, Mexico, Peru, U.S. Each Add Over a Million Records FamilySearch.org added over six million records to its free online database this week. The new collections include seigniorial records from Austria; civil registrations from Chihuahua, Mexico; and probate records from Kentucky, U.S. Also added this week […]

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Sandy on August 30th, 2011

Alan Stewart of Grow Your Own Family Tree publishes a lot of great information on his blog  and the latest is as follows: “TheGenealogist.co.uk has now added a large collection of new Australian records to its Diamond Premium subscription. The records add convict lists, census, general musters, ledger returns and the First Fleet, which was the name given […]

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Sandy on August 19th, 2011

The following is an announcement released yesterday, Thursday, August 18,  from Footnote.com, which has now been renamed Fold3. Going forward Fold3 will focus on producing the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available: “Today we announced our intention to create the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available on […]

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Sandy on August 18th, 2011

Ancestry.com press release says: “PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011)- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April […]

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The following is the most up-to-date information about digital convict records to be published by the UK National Archives. The records are to be transcribed, digitized and published online by Brightsolid. There’s a link to the Brightsolid website which were you can read some interesting facts about the company:  “The National Archives’ crime, courts and […]

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Here’s some interesting news from FindMyPast.co.uk about a fundamental change to be made to the way the site is organized. The changes should make it a lot easier for you to find and search the millions of new records being added to their database every month: “Findmypast has grown an awful lot since we last […]

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A couple of days ago FamilySearch.org announced that their new FamilySearch Film Ordering System is available in the U.S. Northwest/West Area. This is in addition to other areas that have current access of the system.  The announcement also lists which areas will be available soon including Australia, New Zealand and Belgium: “This announcement is to […]

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Sandy on August 8th, 2011

From the UK National Archives: “To celebrate the centenary of the 1911 census, The National Archives is holding a one-day conference, Celebrating the Census, on 1 October. Places are limited and are available on a first come first served basis, so book early to guarantee your place. You could also win two tickets for the conference […]

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Chris Paton says: “Ancestral Scotland (www.ancestralscotland.com) is offering 30 free ScotlandsPeople credits, worth £7, to overseas residents in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The credits can be used at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk to view Scottish vital and census records (about 4 digitised records and two LDS 1881 census transcriptions views – wills and Arms not included).” Click […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

FamilySearch.org says: “Records of the Swedish American Churches are a great source for genealogical information and especially for helping to establish the place of origin in Sweden. Many of the Swedish-American church records kept in American are of the same high quality found as the records of Sweden. Sweden had a State Church (1527 to […]

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Sandy on August 3rd, 2011

I saw this post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and wanted to pass it along his reference to intimate details that people share on Facebook all the while they protest sharing census information: “They may not mind sharing their most intimate details up on Facebook, but the majority of Australians want their census records destroyed for […]

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Sandy on July 31st, 2011

The British National Archives has launched a new library catalog named Koha after a Maori custom that translates to gift or donation. If, like me, you have ancestors from the UK you’ll find it very helpful to learn different aspects of history and the social norms of the times your ancestors lived. The announcement is […]

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Staff at the ScotlandsPeople center said in a news update that they were excited to find an entry in the 1841 Census for South Uist (an island that lies off the west coast of Scotland) confirming that many people had emigrated from that Island to Cape Breton in Nova Scotia. It’s unusual to find comments […]

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Sandy on July 14th, 2011

The following is an announcement from Findmypast.co.uk: “We are very proud to announce the launch of four sets of nineteenth and twentieth century military records to help enrich your family history. The records provide useful detail including attestation and leaving dates, achievements made in service and soldiers’ physical appearence. And, certainly in the case of the […]

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According to an article in the Guysborough Journal  the Guysborough Historical Society (GHS) has opened a new research center in thebasement of the Old Courthouse Museum. It’s available for use by visitors and locals for genealogical research. Easy and safe access to museum archives, books and records is available year-round. The GHS also hopes that […]

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The National Archives has launched the new Discovery service, a search facility that will help you find, understand and their records. The service will eventually replace the Catalogue and incorporate paid-for services such as DocumentsOnline. “The Discovery service enables you to filter search results by subject, date and collection, and also introduces map-based searching. Millions of […]

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Sandy on July 6th, 2011

MyHeritige.com has posted information today about a new offering called Family Goals which permits families to split the bill on Premium and PremiumPlus subscriptions. This enables family members to chip in to cover the costs thus making family history research more affordable and, at the same time, encourage the wider family to become more connected […]

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Sandy on June 29th, 2011

Grow Your Own Family Tree says: “One of the most comprehensive records of the Irish 1916 Easter Rising has been released in a fully searchable structured index for the first time. The Sinn Féin Rebellion Handbook was published by the Irish Times in 1917 and provides a fascinating insight into one of the most important […]

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Sandy on June 29th, 2011

I’ve seen many books on the origins and function of Freemasonry but started to think about it on a more personal level after re-reading my grandfather’s obituary, which included the fact that he was a member of two Masonic lodges. After making a couple of inquiries I was informed that because of the secrecy involved […]

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Sandy on June 27th, 2011

The following post appeared on the Family Search blog. The FamilySearch.org website provides a continuing learning experience in genealogy and it’s free: “Those of Irish ancestry are well aware of Ireland’s turbulent, troubled history and costly fight for independence. Adding to Ireland’s painful saga was the bloody Irish Civil War fought between1922-1923. One of the […]

Continue reading about Irish Probate Records

Sandy on June 24th, 2011

Findmypast.co.uk has just released a huge index and images of  WO96 militia records for 1806-1915. The records are a valuable resource for genealogy research.  See below: “We’ve just published over half a million Militia Service Records, covering 1806 to 1915, in association with The National Archives and in partnership with FamilySearch. This is the first time these records […]

Continue reading about Britain’s everyday military heroes!

As reported in the UPI.com article today, a congressional subcommittee was informed that 59 boxes of records about people buried in Arlington National Cemetery have been discovered in an unsecured Virginia storage locker. The records contained the names and social security numbers of the deceased, but officials believe the security risk is low. The boxes […]

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Sandy on June 23rd, 2011

The East India Company was created as a Royal Charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I (1533 – 1603) . It has been said that without it the world would not be the same today. It changed the world’s tastes, it’s thinking and it’s people by creating new communities, trading places, and shaped countries and established […]

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Sandy on June 22nd, 2011

FindMyPast.co.uk says: “Adding to our British Army Service Records 1760-1915 collection, we have just published over 500,000 soliders’ records in our Militia service records 1806-1915. These records offer a rich source of information to the family historian, especially because attestation papers form a major part of this collection. Attestation refers to the papers drawn up upon […]

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If, like me, you’ve been researching on FamilySearch.org for several years and have been accustomed to finding things on the old site and are struggling with the new interface, you’ll be happy to know that you can now search for historical records using batch numbers from the International Genealogical Index (IGI). What’s a Batch Number? […]

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Ian Tester of findmypast says: “Hello – I’m Ian Tester, the Product Manager for findmypast, and I wanted to let you know about a neat little project we’re in the middle of to make your experience of searching records a little better. You may have noticed recently that small blue stars have started appearing next […]

Continue reading about Saving your records – what’s new, what’s coming at Findmypast

Sandy on June 3rd, 2011

As of Monday, June 6th, when you make copies in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) research rooms in the Washington, area they will be printed on Windsor Blue paper. This is being done to help delineate which papers were copied on NARA equipment or printed at one of the public use PC printers […]

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FindMyPast.co.uk says: “We have just published 42,291 new London Probate Index records on findmypast.co.uk Most of the records are from 1750 to 1858 – although we have around 70 records outside that date range – and they may prove very useful in providing more detail about London ancestors. The records come from the London Probate Index […]

Continue reading about FindMyPast had added more than 42,000 new London Probate Index records

As reported in a Boston Phoenix article, Google informed its partners that its News Archive project would stop accepting, scanning and indexing microfilm and other archival material from newspapers. Google has instead decided to focus its energies on “newer projects that help the industry, such as Google One Pass, a platform that enables publishers to […]

Continue reading about Google abandons master-plan to archive the world’s newspapers

With the advent of the amazing and increasingly useful online genealogical resources, family historians have come to realize how important it is to keep up with the latest in technology. It’s with this in mind that I’m posting this very interesting news release from Ancestry.com: “PROVO, Utah, May 18, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com Inc. […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com to Present at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch 2011 Technology Conference

Findmypast.co.uk has a new and improved death records search–see below: “Easily find records of your ancestors’ deaths using findmypast.co.uk’s powerful new death records search Following the transformation of our births and marriages, we have revolutionised how you search for your ancestors’ death records. When you search, you will be presented with a list of individual names – […]

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The National Archives Science Working Group has just released a publication developed with a team of archivists, records managers, data managers and scientists in Federal agencies is designed to help Federal agency CIOs, IT program staff and records officers understand what procedures are in place now and what policies and process procedures need to be […]

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I’d like to point you to a website called African Origins. It contains information about the migration history of Africans who were forcibly carried on slave ships. This important site will bring to light the history of millions of Africans captured and sold into slavery during suppression of the transatlantic slave trade during the 19th century. […]

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Sandy on May 12th, 2011

When a loved one dies we often realize too late that a lot of memories have been irrevocably lost and we spend a lot of time wondering why we didn’t ask questions. Becoming interested in genealogy is a real eye opener because it helps us to discover the real people who contributed to making you, […]

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On May 5, NARA and five national and international research organizations met in Washington DC to launch a new international research portal for records related to Nazi-era cultural properties. The purpose of the project is to extend public access to the records through a single internet portal. This includes access to descriptions and digitized copies […]

Continue reading about Global catalogue of Nazi-looted art records published online for family researchers and historians

Sandy on April 29th, 2011

Dutch explorers found Australia in the early 1600s, but decided against settling because the land was too dry and inhospitable. After losing the American colonies the British were anxious to find another place to ship convicts and established the state of New South Wales as a penal colony. In 1788, nine ships of convicts along […]

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Sandy on April 11th, 2011

FindMyPast.com.uk says: “We have just published two new sets of military records on findmypast.co.uk: Royal Navy Officers Medal Roll 1914-1920 and New Zealand WWI Soldiers. Below is further information about these records and the valuable details about your ancestors you could discover. Royal Navy Officers Medal Roll 1914-1920 These records comprise a transcript of the complete WWI […]

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Sandy on April 10th, 2011

Beware! this is my personal opinion. The following list of tips from World Vital Records is one of the best I’ve seen for online research with reminders to back-up your work, save originals, and print out. They’ve kept it simple, unlike many who give good advice, but the lists are way too convoluted with many […]

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I never forget that I owe my knowledge of and acquaintance with my ancestors for the most part to FamilySearch.org.  And, I still believe that their organization is the best place for beginners to start their search and learn how it all works. I’d like to remind you of their wonderful free classes and vast […]

Continue reading about Family Search adds 14 Million New Records from Belgium, Canada, Chile, England, Netherlands, Slovakia, South Africa, and the U.S.

“The 26th release of files from the Security Service MI5 reveals secret plans including assassination plots and use of poisons after the Second World War. This release contains 180 files, bringing the total of Secret Service files at The National Archives to 4,725. Many of the files are available at DocumentsOnline. You can download them for […]

Continue reading about MI5 releases and 180 files to the UK National Archives including assassination plots and use of poisons

Sandy on April 5th, 2011

The 1911 Scottish census is available as of today April 5, 2011. The images of the books are in full color and for the first time including particulars of marriage, the number of children born from the marriage, the occupation and nationality of the person listed on the census. People with special needs were enumerated as […]

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The following copied from the National Archives and Records Administration website to help spread the word  about a media conference scheduled by the NARA to take place on April 12. The discussion is one on how technology could improve access to government information for all. It’s  free and open to the public but registration is required. […]

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FindMyPast.co.uk has added more records to their database as follows: “You can now search for your ancestors in 1,447,671 new baptism, marriage and burial records for Hampshire on findmypast.co.uk This substantial new release of records will really benefit those with Hampshire roots. The table below provides the details about these new records: Type of records Number […]

Continue reading about FindMyPast has added over 1.4 million Hampshire, England, parish records