Research

Origins.net offers access to exclusive British and Irish record collections dating back to the 13th century . As stated in their most recent newsletter, Origins has some of the most complete and accurate data on the Internet. The latest addition to the National Wills Index is the Lancashire Wills Index (1457-1748 & 1793-1812) and Surrey […]

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Sandy on September 16th, 2012

The last day for members of the public to stop by the Georgia State Archives will be on October 31, 2012. Georgia Secretary of state Brian Kemp announced on Thursday of this week that the state archives will be closed to general public walk-ins. This makes Georgia the only state without a place for the […]

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CastleGarden.org is a free resource and a great resource, not only for family historians and genealogists, but also for educators, students, and the interested public. It’s an educational project of The Battery Conservancy, offering access to an amazing database of information on 11 million immigrants from 1820–1892, the year Ellis Island opened. Over 100 million […]

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The 33rd Annual Texas Hispanic Genealogical and Historical Conference: Los Caminos del Rio is schedule to take place on South Padre Island, Texas, from October 11-14 and from the Agenda promises to be a great event. The event will feature informative speakers, tours, sightseeing and plenty of networking functions. The conference is held in a […]

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Sandy on August 10th, 2012

Findmypast.co.uk now has a large collection of prison ship records that include details about the prisoners as to the crime they committed and reports from their gaoler (jailer) as follows: “You can now search records for 8,900 prisoners held captive on prison ships, or hulks, on findmypast.co.uk Hulks were ships used as floating prisons – […]

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The following is a news release from Ancestry.com: “Research Connects First African-American President to First African Slave in the American Colonies PROVO, UTAH – July 30, 2012 – A research team from Ancestry.com (NASDAQ:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, has concluded that President Barack Obama is the 11thgreat-grandson of John Punch, the first […]

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“Looking for relatives in Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Utah? We’ve just released fully-searchable indexes for all 12 states. And 26 other states are ready to search. And remember, if the state you’re waiting for isn’t indexed yet, you can still look through 1940 […]

Continue reading about 1940 Census update: 38 states & territories indexed at Ancestry.com

Sandy on July 26th, 2012

Wartime leader Sir Winston Churchill was one of the greatest leaders of the 20th Century. Not only are his books eloquently written they are also interesting and notably readable. At the end of World War II, Winston Churchill was forced to resign as British prime minister following the Conservative party’s electoral defeat by the Labor […]

Continue reading about Winston Churchill resigns July 26, 1945

Sandy on July 25th, 2012

Thanks to the Manchester and Lancashire Family History Society who provided the information, Findmypast.co.uk (subscription or pay-as-you-go) has newly published the following two sets of WWI records: Oldham Employers’ Roll of Honour 1914-1920 Search records for more than 1,900 men who had enlisted in His Majesty’s Armed Forces and who were employed by companies in […]

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A newly revamped and user friendly website will soon be online from the Library and Archives of Canada. It’s one of the first federal sites to conform to the new Government of Canada design. The news release is as follows: “A new gateway for finding out about Canada’s heritage will soon be opening up online: […]

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A collection of records comprising 128,000 images of the Church of England parish baptisms, marriages, banns and burials called The Canterbury Collection is now available at Findmypast as follows: “We are pleased to announce the launch of the Canterbury Collection on findmypast.co.uk The collection comprises 128,000 images of Church of England parish baptisms, marriages, banns […]

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As most of us know New York City is the Big Apple of the Northeast. This wasn’t always the case. About 500  years ago (1500 and 1530) when Europeans were starting to visit the New World, a new settlement the size of Manhattan was established in Canada on the North Shore of Lake Ontario in […]

Continue reading about ‘Mantle’ Site, ancient Manhattan sized settlement found on Lake Ontario shore.

Don’t forget you can research online free of charge on FamilySearch.org. The latest additions to their 1940 Census Index Project is as follows:  “FamilySearch is excited to announce the addition of Minnesota and Rhode Island to the list of completed and searchable states in the 1940 US Census Index Project. To date we have indexed 84.35% of the entire […]

Continue reading about FamilySearch 1940 Census Index Project adds Minnesota and Rhode Island to search-by-name

Sandy on July 9th, 2012

One hundred and thirty-five years ago the All England Croquet and Lawn Tennis Club began its first lawn tennis tournament at Wimbledon, England. Although  a total of  22 people registered to play in the Gentlemen’s Singles tournament only 21 amateurs competed on the July 9, 1877 the first day of the tournament. The prize was […]

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If you’re looking for another resource to help you locate your Scottish ancestors the National Library of Scotland (NLS) has over 700 directories digitized, which cover most of Scotland and date from 1773 to 1911. They are also a valuable resource for the years not covered by the census which started in 1841 and carried […]

Continue reading about Post Office Directories 1773-1911 online at the National Library of Scotland

The following is a news release from Ancestry.com clearly illustrating the continued popularity of genealogy and family history research:   “PROVO, Utah, July 2, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com (Nasdaq:ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, has added its two-millionth active current subscriber. The milestone recently was reached when Yvonne Ocheltree, of Collierville, Tenn., […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com reaches a big milestone with two million active current subscribers

Origins.net is offering free access to the Prerogative  Court of York Wills and Administration as follows: “Prior to the establishment of a government run system for probate in 1858, there existed over 300 church courts where wills could be proved. One of the most important of these was the Prerogative Court of the Archbishop of York, […]

Continue reading about Celebrate July 4th with free access to the Prerogative Court of York Wills and Administration

Ancestry.com has added fully indexed online records on the 1940 census for the following six states: Colorado Ohio Pennsylvania Tennesee Vermont Virginia Completion of these indexes now provides search availability of over 39 million records in ten states and the District of Columbia

Continue reading about Six more states now searchable by name in the 1940 census on Ancestry

On July 1st each year, Canadians celebrate Canada Day. On July 1,  1867, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Province of Canada were united as a single country. The union was an outcome of the Constitution Act, which granted Canada a large measure of independence from England. Over the course of a century, Canada gradually […]

Continue reading about Canadian genealogy records can be searched for free through July 2

Sandy on June 28th, 2012

Findmypast has published 4,625 new parish records for Yorkshire, England: “Any of you with Yorkshire roots will want to search these records to see if they hold new information to add to your family tree. The Ryedale Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records, in association with the Federation of Family History Societies. See […]

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Popular family history and genealogy research website MyHeritage has a new search engine called SuperSearch, now in Beta, specifically to help researchers locate historical records. SuperSearch has been in development since early 2011 and MyHeritage says that it’s one of the most comprehensive products they’ve ever developed. It’s being touted as an exciting moment for […]

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New indexed records and digital images have been added to the FamilySearch.org database as follows: “FamilySearch published new, free records online for Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, England, Georgia, Indonesia, Italy, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. The 1940 US Census Community Project continues to progress […]

Continue reading about New records and images added at FamilySearch for Austria, Belgium, China, Philippines, and the U.S.

ScotlandsPeople has posted the following announcement:  “We have changed the pricing and payment method for purchasing Wills & Testaments documents on the ScotlandsPeople website. Instead of purchasing a Will & Testament through a separate transaction, these documents can now be viewed using ScotlandsPeople credits. As an introductory offer we have also reduced the cost from £5 GBP […]

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Findmypast.co.uk has just published 25,000 new records as follows: “We’ve just added more than 25,000 new Royal Household records to our collection: Establishment Lists for Master of the Household’s Department 1835-1924: 7,158 records Establishment Lists for the Royal Mews 1717-1924: 18,281 records The new records represent an addition to the Royal Household records we published earlier this […]

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Findmypast.co.uk has just published about 70,000 new parish records for Sheffield, England, as follows: “We’ve just published almost 70,000 new parish records for Sheffield on findmypast.co.uk The records span the vast period 1767 to 1986 and will be essential to anyone with ancestors from Sheffield. The Sheffield & District Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records, […]

Continue reading about 70,000 newly Sheffield parish records added to Brightsolid’s Findmypast

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has recently published an updated Open Government Plan for 2012-2014 designed to guide their efforts “in transparency, participation, and collaboration”. Although I can’t agree with the transparency, participation, and collaboration mantra for all government organizations, I believe that NARA always puts its best foot forward. Unlike some other […]

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Sandy on June 15th, 2012

Here’s a timely reminder from Ancestry about free access  to War of 1812 records at Fold3: “On June 18, 1812, the United States declared war on Great Britain officially launching the War of 1812. In the 200 years since, it has become a forgotten war, perhaps best remembered by school children as when The Star-Spangled Bannerwas written. […]

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Sandy on June 15th, 2012

Prisoner of War records for WWI and WWII are now available for research at Findmypast as follows: “Search for your ancestors in new WWI and WWII Prisoner of War records published today on findmypast.co.uk These records hold vital information about men taken prisoner of war during both World Wars. Naval and Military Press provided findmypast.co.uk […]

Continue reading about WWII and WWII Prisoner of War records online

The American Revolution Center, a non-partisan organization, owns an amazing collection of manuscripts, rare books, paintings, sculpture, textiles and weapons has now unveiled plans to build The Museum of the American Revolution, where the collection will be displayed as a living memorial. The collection is currently highlighted on their website listed below. The most recent […]

Continue reading about Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell and now The Museum of the American Revolution unveiled in Philadelphia

Sandy on June 12th, 2012

FamilySearch.org says: “One of the most often used and impressive features ofFamilySearch.org is the massive collection of genealogy records. FamilySearch has the largest collection of genealogical collections in the world with billions of records available to the public free of charge. FamilySearch has recently released two new videos that discuss this massive collection of genealogical records. The […]

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Sandy on June 11th, 2012

It’s amazing what fear of the unknown can conjure up. About to be put up for auction in Britain is an 1890s vampire-slaying kit described as “almost complete and in good condition” and expected to fetch up to $2,000. The vampire-slaying tools are housed in a blue velvet lined mahogany box with the inner cover […]

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Arlington National Cemetery will soon be the first national burial site to go digital via a smartphone app due to be on the market in the fall. With the power of GPS technology visitors will be able to more easily find loved ones buried in the cemetery. Also included is an online component which will […]

Continue reading about A new high-tech App to help visitors pinpoint graves at Arlington Cemetery

Sandy on June 8th, 2012

A lot of us miss seeing and listening to brutally frank comments from Simon Cowell on American Idol. Let’s face it, the show hasn’t been quite the same since he picked up his marbles and moved on. Simon Cowell, one of the richest individuals in the world of entertainment, is the fourth post in Roy […]

Continue reading about Interesting roots: Simon Cowell’s family tree

The DNA Consultants Blog is a great source of inspiration and information and yesterday’s post is an interesting read. Long before the days of DNA testing scientists, Thomas Jefferson and Constantine Rafinesque, demonstrated the genetic similarity between native Americans and Turkic peoples of the Altai region of southern Siberia. I thought the comment at the […]

Continue reading about Native Americans and Turkic people of southern Siberia share common ancestors

More than 7,500 new parish records for North West Kent are available at  findmypast.co.uk as follows: “Anyone with Kent ancestors will be keen to search the records for new details to add to their family tree. The North West Kent Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records, in association with the Federation of Family […]

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Shares of Ancestry.com rose today after a news report that the company is looking for a buyer. I’m not surprised—this is probably the best time to consider selling. According to the consistently reliable Bloomberg Ancestry.com “is weighing a sale and is working with Frank Quattrone’s Qatalyst Partners LLC to find buyers.” Although Ancestry is declining […]

Continue reading about Ancestry stock rose today amid reports that it may be for sale

It’s amazing to know that 13.5 million people lived in New York in 1940. It was the country’s biggest state at that time and the census pages are chock full of fascinating folks. Ancestry.com has now just launched the 1940 U.S. Federal Census Index for the Empire State, which now joins the District of Columbia, […]

Continue reading about New York 1940 census now searchable by name at Ancestry.com plus some recognizable names

The Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree has gained in popularity during  the past four years. This year the conference is scheduled to take place in Burbank, from Friday, June 8th through Sunday, June 10th. There are two Pre-events scheduled on Thursday June 7, one Family History Writers Conference and two, the Tech-Track. They look like terrific events […]

Continue reading about Free SCGS Jamboree sessions streamed free of charge June 9 and 10

FamilySearch.org has reached a milestone with their 1940 Census project. To date 51.88% of the census has been indexed. It doesn’t mean that 50% of the census has a searchable index. Unfortunately end users won’t see that for a while. It has taken 2 months to reach the current status thanks to the legion of […]

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Fold3 is a subscription website that provides convenient access to US military records, including the stories, photos, and personal documents of the men and women who served. It’s a very useful site for Historians, Family Historians, Researchers, Teachers and much more. For my readers who live outside the U.S. the Fold3 names is derived from […]

Continue reading about Fold3 opens War of 1812 records for free until June 30th

The Scots have a rare humor when it comes to death and if you’ve heard some to the irreverent Scottish jokes about the subject you’d understand. Don’t get wrong my generation also had a healthy respect for the dead. We always enjoyed those visits to the cemetery on Sunday’s, which usually included a walk around […]

Continue reading about Ten source documents family historians and genealogists need for death records

The following press release from Ancestry.com gives details of U.S. Marine Corps activities during World War II and the Korean War. Many iconic celebrities are part of the collection, including: Ted Williams, Bea Arthur, accused JFK assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, Steve McQueen, F. Lee Bailey, Gene Hackman, Dan Rather, Jim Lehrer, Harvey Keitel, Ed McMahon […]

Continue reading about Military history of Ted Williams, Lee Harvey Oswald, Bea Arthur and more…

Sandy on June 1st, 2012

If you’ve ever wondered if any family member worked in the Royal Household or, you’ve heard someone in the know talk about it, Findmypast.co has added royal staff records to their ever growing database. The following news release includes a link where you search free of charge, but transcripts and scanned images of the original […]

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With a name like “Big Ben” one might think we’re talking about a North American grizzly bear. Big Ben is actually a famous clock on top of 320-foot-high St. Stephen’s tower. Those classic pictures of the British Houses of Parliament in London wouldn’t be the same without that famous tower-clock. If you’d been around to […]

Continue reading about Big Ben goes into operation in London 153 years ago today

Findmypast Ireland has made a second batch of records available from the Irish Petty Sessions books as follows: “Today we launch online the second batch of records from the Petty Sessions order books (1850-1910), one of the greatest untapped resources for those tracing their Irish roots. The original Petty Sessions records are held at the […]

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Sandy on May 30th, 2012

The first million dollar allocation as part of a plan to restore historical monuments around the world is being distributed by American Express in conjunction with The World Monument Fund. The plan is to provide million dollar restoration to six historic landmarks located in Brazil, Mexico, India, New Zealand, Japan and the United Kingdom. Respected […]

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I’ve  found the International Genealogical Index (IGI) available at FamilysSearch.org very useful in the past. It has been a mix of community indexed sources and community contributed records. Apparently this mix meant that the records weren’t equally reliable. The problem is in the process of being resolved with the creation of two separate collections searchable […]

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Sandy on May 29th, 2012

Family Search has a lot to offer and it’s free. There’s a new feature called My Source Box. It’s a useful new place to bookmark a source record and organize them into folders. People with access to the Family Tree can locate a record and add it to the source box for addition to the […]

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It would be hard to miss the promotion by FamilySearch.org of BillionGraves.com which is owned and operated by AppTime. Family Historians and Genealogists will love the constantly expanding database of records and images from cemeteries around the world. Digitized images of each gravestone will be tagged with GPS coordinates to make finding your ancestors an […]

Continue reading about BillionGraves.com makes finding your ancestors graves easy with mobile phone app

If you’re ancestors hailed from the counties of Suffolk and Kent in England you’ll be interested to know that Findmypast.co.uk has published more than 180,000 new parish records for Suffolk and North West Kent as follows: “The Suffolk Family History Society and North West Kent Family History Society provided findmypast.co.uk with these records, in association with the […]

Continue reading about England’s Suffolk and North West Kent parish records recently added to Findmypast

I’m sure the venue for next year’s National Genealogical Society’s in Las Vegas will be a popular one. The press release is as follows: “Arlington, VA, 17 May 2012. The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announced at their Family History Conference in Cincinnati last week that the 2013 NGS Family History Conference, Building New Bridges, will be […]

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Sandy on May 21st, 2012

I’ve just read an interesting article posted online by the Irish Times regarding Y-DNA with which I agree. There’s a lot of sales patter and technical jargon out there, but the principle behind genealogical Y-DNA testing is simple and logical. The Y-DNA chromosome is passed along intact from father to son. A random mutation is […]

Continue reading about The realities of DNA testing

The British National Archives has made Olympic and Paralympic documents and images available online for the 19th 20th and 21st centuries. This is a first. The new site called The Olympic Record has a timeline, which enables researchers to brows material from summer Olympics from the Athens games in 1896 to the Beijing games in 2008. […]

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On May 11, 1812, Spencer Perceval, Britain’s prime minister was shot to death in the lobby of the House of Commons by John Bellingham, a demented businessman. Bellingham who was enraged at his failure to get government compensation for war debts incurred in Russia immediately gave himself up to the authorities.  Though deemed insane, he […]

Continue reading about The assassination of British Prime Minister, Spencer Perceval

Sandy on May 9th, 2012

GenDetective is a genealogy software from RumbleSoft that’s different from most commercial databases on the market today.  It has been described as “a tool that analyzes your genealogical data to produce research recommendations based on missing or incomplete data”.  The software is planned to enable the genealogist to hone his/her research and actually points out additional […]

Continue reading about RumbleSoft Releases GenDetective Version 1.5

Ancestry.com has released a database containing membership cards with details on women who joined the Cadet Nurse Corps created during WWII as follows: “Historical Background After the United States entered World War II, the military’s needs quickly brought on a nursing shortage. To address the need, federal funding, administered by the Public Health Service, began […]

Continue reading about World War II Cadet Nursing Corps Card Files, 1942-1948 online at Ancestry.com

The old saying look before you leap applies to all information posted on the web and this even applies to the latest offering from the world’s most popular genealogy site. It’s interesting to see that Ancestry has named their Best Practices board of scientific advisors in the following news release: “PROVO, Utah, May 3, 2012 […]

Continue reading about Ancestry.com launches new affordable DNA test analyzing over 700,000 marker locations

The following is an announcement from the National Archives and Records Administration regarding a new Microfilm Research Room: “A new Microfilm Research Room is scheduled to open on Monday, May 21, 2012, in the Robert M. Warner Research Center in the National Archives Building, Washington, DC. It will house 27 researcher carrels, 5 public use […]

Continue reading about New Microfilm Research Room set to open at the National Archives on May 21

The great military leader of the American Revolution George Washington was inaugurated as the first president of the United States on April 30, 1789, in New York.  He was unanimously chosen by all 69 electors in February 1789. In March of that year the new United States constitution officially took effect and, in April, Washington […]

Continue reading about The first presidential inauguration in New York April 30 1789

New York is an amazing city (an understatement). The newly released collection of 870 archived images actually includes a rare crime scene photographs courtesy of the city Department of Records. Reality at its worst but, you’ll also view spectacular photographs of stately bridges and street scenes that truly capture the essence of New York. The […]

Continue reading about Experience the reality of New York City life as 870,000 archived photos go online

Sandy on April 24th, 2012

The subscription or pay-per-view website Findmypast.co.uk  has recently published Boer War records as follows: “We have updated our Boer War collection with almost 10,000 new records. The major inclusions in this update are: The complete Queen’s South Africa medal roll for the Coldstream Guards, Irish Guards, 1st battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers and Rundles Scouts The […]

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Here’s a reminder from Family Tree Magazine about the very popular annual Southern California Genealogy Jamboree:   “If you live on the West Coast, you may already be familiar with the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree. You may have already registered for this year’s event. If not, you’re probably thinking, “Why am I getting this mailing for […]

Continue reading about Southern California Genealogy Jamboree early discount ends April 30

Wills are a wonderful source of information for family historians and genealogy researchers. They provide an amazing peep into your ancestor’s world. The information found in wills usually includes details, such as, where the person who died lived and the name of the executor who is the person responsible for carrying out the wishes of […]

Continue reading about Researching wills at the UK National Archives including last testaments of the famous

If you’re researching your family history, or just an enthusiastic NASCAR racing (especially a Jr. Nation) fan, you’ll be more than interested to know that Dale Earnhardt Jr. has discovered an interest in his own genealogy. I couldn’t help smiling when I read the article written by Jim Utter of the Charlotte Observer, because Dale […]

Continue reading about Famous NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Junior connects to his past

There’s an entry dated April 19 on the Ancestry.com blog about the indexing of the 1940 census. The purpose of the article is to answer the question many have been asking as to why their state is not listed yet. I did mention in a previous blog post that I didn’t expect to see the […]

Continue reading about Why it’s taking so long for Ancestry.com to index the 1940 Census