Research

The following is an announcement from The Foundation for the National Archives: “WASHINGTON, April 18, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Foundation for the National Archives announces the publication of the Genealogy Tool Kit: Getting Started on Your Family History at the National Archives, written by National Archives genealogy archives specialist John P. Deeben. This 160-page step-by-step guide […]

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Sandy on April 17th, 2012

It doesn’t take much for most of us to remember the deadline for filing our taxes, here in the U.S., is upon us and to remember that we had a reprieve this year.  April 15, was Sunday and April 16 was designated as Emancipation Day in the District of Columbia. Today is it. Since we are […]

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Ancestry.com has posted the following information from its DNA testing group: “Ancestry.com DNA has recently updated a Y-chromosome DNA test marker name and its allele value to comply with a recently released industry-wide recommendation by the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG). One of the markers in our Y-chromosome DNA test has changed names from “Y-GATA […]

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Grow Your Own Family Tree has published an interesting article that I’ve published in it’s entirety. In doing so I’d like to give a heads-up to Alan Stewart’s factual website: “The Irish Family History Foundation (IFHF) has introduced a charge for viewing search results as well as details of records. Up to now, searching databases and […]

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The following information regarding the indexing of 1940 census was posted by Ancestry.coma: “What a difference a week makes. Since the National Archives released the 1940 Census to us last Monday, we’ve been hard at work to get every one of the 3.8 million 1940 Census images online. And while we were at it, we […]

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The British National Archives is planning the launch of their new website Discovery at the end of June 2012.  Having  found that searching the site and finding cogent information has been a challenge with the old system, this is music to my ‘eyes’. Discovery will replace the current Catalogue site and offers additional features, which […]

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FamilySearch.org has, only a few days ago, added just over 34 million new records online for the following countries: Brazil Canada Chile Columbia Czech Republic England France Germany Ireland Mexico Norway Peru Portugal Puerto Rico Scotland United States Wales. You can search this amazing newly digitized collection as well as a startling 2.5 billion other records […]

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Sandy on April 2nd, 2012

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has announced that the 1940 census will be available on April 2, 2012 and will be online at 9:00 a.m. (Eastern). This is an official website of NARA in partnership with Archives.com. There are 3.8 images available from door-to-door record taking of 132.2 million Americans. They hand-written images […]

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Sandy on March 30th, 2012

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the release of the 1940 on April 2 at 9:00 a.m. The only place you’ll find the entire online census is 1940census.archives.gov published in conjunction with genealogy company Archives.com. To help you get started, if you’d like to download a free guide on how to read the […]

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The following is an interesting and useful press release I received from Ancestry.com: “Families Can Connect to the Bay State’s Historical Past Through Centuries of Birth, Marriage and Death Records Which Are Now Available Online For the First Time PROVO, UT, March 20, 2012 — Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that […]

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Sandy on March 19th, 2012

You may have read my recent post on this blog MyHeritage the world’s largest family genealogy network now offers DNA testing regarding the business move at MyHeritage to integrate their DNA database with the Family Tree DNA and a customer base of 62 million users. This means an expansion into new markets for the benefit of […]

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The Dublin probate records and marriage license index is now available on Ancestry.co.uk as follows:  “The vast majority of records in this database are index entries extracted from wills, letters of administration, acts of probate, marriage licences, and other records within the Diocese of Dublin. These indexes were included as appendices to two volumes (the […]

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Sandy on March 16th, 2012

Crista Cowan writing on the Ancestry.com blog offers some useful research tips  for people with a little or a lot of Irish in them as follows: “One in eight Americans claim Irish ancestry according to an American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008. That works out to about 36 million people. […]

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The British National Archives has revised and made available for online research, the Manorial Documents Register for Gloucestershire, England. The records still have legal relevance today, safeguarding rights and defining privileges. They give wonderful insight into the lives of ordinary people in the Middle Ages. Records have been identified as far afield as Utah in […]

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If there is one thing that has made a definite impression on me during the last few years of indulging in my interest in history and family history research is that nothing is ever what it seems—well, maybe sometimes it is. I’ve known since I was a teenager that some Scottish history as written by […]

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We’re all aware that privacy has become increasingly important and during these days of the Internet where a disturbing amount of information is available online—whether accurate or not and usually not. Today, Ancestry.com is taking extra measures to make sure that your data online at Ancestry is protected. To this end they have published a […]

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The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has announced that the 1940 census will be available on April 2, 2012 and will be online at 9:00 a.m. (Eastern). This is an official website of NARA in partnership with Archives.com. The link to the site will be: 1940Census.archives.gov Click on the video below to watch the […]

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Sandy on February 21st, 2012

Alan Stewart’s Grow Your Own Family Tree says: “The Ulster Historical Foundation (UHF) has sent information about new online baptism records and other information. The UHF has sent the following information: Belfast baptisms The first batch of new family records for 2012 are now online. The UHF has added over 12,000 baptism records between 1900 and 1924 […]

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GenealogyInTime has an interesting article highlighting some Google search tips. You may have read my article on the trouble at Google with privacy laws and their recent privacy change, which will negatively impact your genealogy research. As you’ve probably heard by now that the information from Google+, Chrome,and Gmail is now being used to affect […]

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Okay, so were now in the second week of 2012 and your inbox has probably been filled with ideas for potential goals for the next twelve months. If you’re like the majority of people, administrative and clerical tasks are considered mundane chores in comparison with all the interesting research you do to find who or […]

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Here’s a shout-out to 23andMe for not only making their information more interesting for genealogists this past year but also for their interesting research in personal genetics. They have an improved relative finder tool and have made groundbreaking research discoveries, thanks to members contributions in their study of the genetics of Parkinson’s Disease. It will […]

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The University of St Andrews, founded in 1413, is Scotland’s first university and the third oldest in the English-speaking world. Talented researchers at St Andrews University, have officially launched a new online catalog of books published between the invention of print and the end of the 16th century. The work is the result of over […]

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Sandy on November 10th, 2011

As you’ll see from the following news release from findmypast, England’s county of Cheshire is famous for more than the delicious cheese: “CHESHIRE REVEALED AS A WONDERLAND OF UNUSUAL FINDS AS NEW LOCAL RECORDS GO ONLINE Lewis Carroll’s baptism found in Daresbury,11 July 1832 Earthquake hit Cheshire on 18 March 1612 Ancestors of James Bond […]

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I’d like to share yesterday’s post by Diane L. Richard on the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Blog. As I’ve mentioned many times on this blog NGS is a tremendous resource for anyone interested in family history research.  This particular blog post is about JSTOR, which is a service provided by a non-profit organization called  ITHAKA. […]

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According to an article in the Irish Times written by science editor Dick Ahlstrom, geneticists have teamed up to attempt to root out what it means to be truly Irish. The plan is to map families to their ancestral homes and focus on subtle genetic differences between hailing from Bantry as opposed to Ballinasloe. Details […]

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Being a member of The National Genealogical Association (NGS) is a real learning experience and a fountainhead  of information for anyone interested in family history research and genealogy.  A few days ago NGS  announced the appointment of  Teresa Koch-Bostic of Mineola, New York, to the Board of Directors. Terry is a professional genealogist who specializes […]

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Sandy on October 14th, 2011

UK family history site Genes Reunited have added the following Parish records to their growing record collection: “ Today sees the launch of over 35 million baptism, marriage and burial records for England and Wales dating back to 1538. Parish records are an important source for family historians allowing them to trace their ancestors back further […]

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The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) has recently launched a beautiful website dedicated to Native American ancestry titled Trace Indian Ancestry offering helpful tips and information on researching the genealogy of your Native American ancestors: “To determine if you are eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, contact the tribe, or tribes, you […]

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Sandy on September 10th, 2011

It’s not only journalism students who are taught to answer those, who, what, when, where, why, and how, questions used when analyzing the fruits of our research.  These questions can be applied to most subjects and certainly includes the evidence obtained from your genealogical sources. And, while it’s true in all instances that evidence varies […]

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As a reminder, iOS is Apple’s mobile operating system originally developed for the iPhone it has been developed to support other Apple devices such as iPad, iPod touch and Apple TV. It’s not available for Android. That said, this blog post is about the latest App for iOS the Wolfram Genealogy and History Research Assistant […]

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When you make the decision to research your family tree you may want to ponder a while before you proceed, just to make sure that you’ll be able to accept what you uncover. People normally share stories about the good things of life or sad stories with happy endings, leaving out the shocking realities that […]

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If you’ve been searching for an ancestor in the right place only to discover that you were looking in the wrong county, The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries could prove to be a great help. How often have you searched for an ancestor only to discover that although you were searching in the right place […]

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Sandy on June 15th, 2011

Why I would think that backroom politics happened during the Tudor and Stuart Early Modern period beats me. The UK National Archives has made available online documents exposing backroom politics from 1509-1714 for academic research as follows: “The largest set of government documents from the Early Modern period is now available online for academic research. […]

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Ian Tester of findmypast says: “Hello – I’m Ian Tester, the Product Manager for findmypast, and I wanted to let you know about a neat little project we’re in the middle of to make your experience of searching records a little better. You may have noticed recently that small blue stars have started appearing next […]

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Deceased online says “A further 105,000 burial records for Aberdeen City have been added to the database. This is in addition to nearly 25,000 burial records for Scotland’s third largest city so this will increase the data size to almost 130,000. The new data is for St Peter’s Cemetery and Churchyard for the period 1830 […]

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I’ve just found a terrific website called Connected Histories I’d like to share that brings together 11 major digital resources related to early modern and nineteenth century Britain (1500-1900), with a single search that allows the sophisticated searching of names places and dates, and the ability to save, connect and even share resources within your […]

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Sandy on April 10th, 2011

Beware! this is my personal opinion. The following list of tips from World Vital Records is one of the best I’ve seen for online research with reminders to back-up your work, save originals, and print out. They’ve kept it simple, unlike many who give good advice, but the lists are way too convoluted with many […]

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The following is a communication from the National Genealogical Society: ‘The NGS 2011 Family History Conference will be held 11–14 May 2011 at the Charleston Area Convention Center, 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston, SC 29418. More than seventy-five nationally recognized speakers will provide over 180 lectures on a wide variety of topics including research in South […]

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