Scotland

According to an official report, rising sea levels are threatening the existence of Orkney’s island’s famous Stone Age village of Skara Brae. A draft management plan for the protection of the Stone Age site chronicles coastal erosion as “a threat to the long-term survival” of the subterranean village. The report, compiled by Unesco, Historic Scotland, […]

Continue reading about Stone Age village of Skara Brae threatened by rising sea

Sandy on November 26th, 2012

Deceased Online  has added 13 cemeteries and burial grounds to the Scottish Memorial Inscriptions collection now available. These are  listed below together with location and earliest readable year. Site Name Earliest Readable Year New Calton Burial Ground, Edinburgh 1746 Invergarry Cemetery, Highlands 1957 Cromdale and Advie, Morayshire 1768 Old Monklands Cemetery 1632 Biggar Churchyard and […]

Continue reading about More Scottish monument inscriptions records go online

Scotland’s University of Glasgow has announced an 18 month project to produce the first ever extensive database of Scotland’s loved poet Robert Burns manuscripts, which could hold great significance for Burns scholars across Scotland. The Centre (center) for Robert Burns Studies is in collaboration with BurnsScotland to examine, digitize and store all Burns papers. Papers […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s Glasgow University to create first-ever comprehensive database of poet Robert Burns’ manuscripts

I’ll start by saying I know that the tap water in Scotland does taste different from the tap water in the United States and many other countries that I’ve visited through the years. There’s nothing like it. And, since I spent my formative years in Scotland I know this is true. I never needed a […]

Continue reading about The 1816 first edition of The Dundee Courier cleaned up for the future using Scottish tap water

If you’re looking for another resource to help you locate your Scottish ancestors the National Library of Scotland (NLS) has over 700 directories digitized, which cover most of Scotland and date from 1773 to 1911. They are also a valuable resource for the years not covered by the census which started in 1841 and carried […]

Continue reading about Post Office Directories 1773-1911 online at the National Library of Scotland

Handwritten letters from the first President of the United States have gone on display at the National Library of Scotland. The following is a press release from the National Library of Scotland. The press release is as follows:  “The road to American independence is being mapped out at the National Library of Scotland (NLS) in […]

Continue reading about Letters from George Washington declaring American Independence on display at the National Library of Scotland

ScotlandsPeople has posted the following announcement:  “We have changed the pricing and payment method for purchasing Wills & Testaments documents on the ScotlandsPeople website. Instead of purchasing a Will & Testament through a separate transaction, these documents can now be viewed using ScotlandsPeople credits. As an introductory offer we have also reduced the cost from £5 GBP […]

Continue reading about ScotlandsPeople has cut prices for buying wills and testaments

Two priceless Catholic collections originally housed in the Blairs Seminary outside of Aberdeen, Scotland, are being returned to the area after 54 years to be housed this time at the University of Aberdeen. This is a big event given the dark history of the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland. In fact, the archives cover some […]

Continue reading about Priceless Catholic church collections to be returned to north-east Scotland after more than 50 years

Sandy on May 2nd, 2012

Kathryn Rudy, a lecturer in the School of Art History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, has analyzed some 15th and early 16th-century European prayer books. The point of the study was to learn the reading habits of people who lived in medieval times and turned out to be a kind of forensic analysis […]

Continue reading about Dirty books reveal medieval reading habits

From crofts to castles you’ll  find a  fascinating snapshot of Scotland during the First World War and a major new family history resource as the Valuation Rolls of Scotland go online for the first time. The news release is as follows: “A detailed picture of wartime Scotland is revealed today with the release of details from […]

Continue reading about Scottish Valuation Rolls go online at Scotlands People

Sandy on February 27th, 2012

My cousin who lives in Australia emailed me an amazing link to the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Queen Street, Edinburgh, Scotland. The gallery which originally opened in 1889 was closed from 2009 to 2011 for a major renovation. This refurbishment included the improvement of a frieze that goes around the Main Hall of the […]

Continue reading about Portrait of a Nation

The Tax valuation records for the Royal Burgh of Perthshire, Scotland to from the mid-17th century to the end of the 19th century are now online at Ancestry.co.uk. You can find 350 years of cess (land tax), stent and valuation rolls online The valuation rolls which run from 1885-1988 contain more information than the cess […]

Continue reading about Ancestry UK now has Scotland’s Perthshire tax valuation records online

On, January 25th every year Scots all over the world gather to celebrate the birth date of Robert Burns (25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796).  My cousin shares the same birthday as the Bard—Happy Birthday T.B. Robert Burns, born in Alloway, Ayreshire, Scotland, is also known as the Ploughman Poet.  His popularity back then (and […]

Continue reading about In celebration of Scotland’s poet Robert Burns birthday–The Bard

The fact that the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso,  is visiting Scotland speaks of a whole new world and a very exciting one for the pupils from all Edinburgh schools because they are going to have the Dalai Lama’s speech broadcast in their classrooms during his visit to the Capital. The enthusiasm can probably be […]

Continue reading about Dalai Lama to visit Edinburgh Scotland, speech will be broadcast to all city school children

An Antarctic search and rescue party discovered the tent of Captain Robert Scott and his two companions on November 12, 1912. They found the body of Scott wedged between those of his team members with the flaps of his sleeping bag and his coat open.  Lt. Henry Bowers and Dr. Edward Wilson lay covered in […]

Continue reading about Centennial of Captain Robert Scott’s ‘Terra Nova’ expedition to South Pole

Sandy on December 31st, 2011

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards:

Continue reading about Happy New Year 2012

St. Andrews is the Patron Saint of Scotland and although widely celebrated every year on November 30th in Scotland every year since the 6th century, St. Andrew’s Day isn’t recognized as a public holiday. There are about 40 million people throughout the world who claim Scottish descent so, as you can well imagine, there’s a […]

Continue reading about Happy St. Andrew’s Day! To 40 million who claim Scottish descent…

Sandy on October 30th, 2011

An interesting newsflash from ScotlandsPeople: “The census street index books for the main towns and cities in Scotland have been digitised for each of the open census years. These books can make it easier to find the registration district and enumeration book details for an address. The streets are arranged alphabetically and the bookmarks allow […]

Continue reading about ScotlandsPeople publishes census street index books

Sandy on October 25th, 2011

Here we go again. The English claim that they invented the game of soccer (called football in the UK) in 1848 when students at Cambridge University formulated the first set of rules. Not so fast England. According to the UKs Daily Record newspaper experts at the Scottish Foodball Museum at Hampden (Hampden Park near Glasgow […]

Continue reading about Scots invented soccer in the1400′s

Archaeologists have discovered a 1000-year old Viking ship holding the body of a chieftain with his shield on his chest along with his sword and spear by his side. This is the first undisturbed Viking ship burial found on the British mainland. The 16ft-long grave on the west Scotland coast was found at the Ardnamurchan […]

Continue reading about 1000 year-old Viking chieftain’s burial ship excavated in Scotland

Here’s the latest from Deceased Online: “After conducting research and finding the cemetery, churchyard or burial ground where an ancestor is buried, many family historians are frustrated that they cannot find the plot or even a rough location for their ancestor’s last resting place. And on a cold, wet Tuesday afternoon in February there is […]

Continue reading about Maps of cemeteries and burial grounds in Angus, Scotland

Sandy on September 12th, 2011

The following is a news flash from Deceased Online:  “Deceased Online has a large stand at the Scottish Association of Family History Societies (SAFHS) annual conference, Adam House, Chambers Street, Edinburgh. You can meet some of our dedicated Scottish team on 25th June where we’ll be unveiling 400,000 Scottish burial and cremation records new to […]

Continue reading about 400,000 more Scottish records from Deceased Online

Because of the changing needs of its customers, the National Library of Scotland (NLS) has plans in the works to update and develop services and functions for the 21st century. As one of the major research libraries in Europe, Scotland NLS is the only legal deposit library that has a copy anything published in the […]

Continue reading about National Library of Scotland Bill Program for Government 2011-2012

On 16 April 1746, about 6 miles from Inverness, Scotland, the  Battle of Culloden Moor was fought. This  was the last battle fought on Scottish soil and was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite (Jacobus is Latin for James) rebellion led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie), against the English Duke of […]

Continue reading about The Battle of Culloden Moor 1746: The last battle ever to be fought on Scottish soil

Early plans have been made public in Edinburgh, Scotland, for a new festival of Scottish history during the month of November of this year. The event is being organized by Ian Harrower and comedian Susan Morrison who plan a ten-day festival involving the city’s museums, libraries, archives, local cafes, bars and shopping centers. The festival […]

Continue reading about Scottish history to be celebrated with a new festival in November

At the beginning of the 19th century the Industrial Revolution had a strong foothold in the Scottish city of Glasgow with the manufacture of cotton and textiles, chemicals, glass, paper and soap. People from the Highlands in the north moved to the area in the 1820s and, later in the 1840s, immigrants arrived from Ireland […]

Continue reading about Victorian Glasgow, Scotland, the “Second City of the Empire”

Chris Paton says: “Ancestral Scotland (www.ancestralscotland.com) is offering 30 free ScotlandsPeople credits, worth £7, to overseas residents in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The credits can be used at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk to view Scottish vital and census records (about 4 digitised records and two LDS 1881 census transcriptions views – wills and Arms not included).” Click […]

Continue reading about Claim your free credits for ScotlandsPeople research

Sandy on August 4th, 2011

If you’ve ever visited Scotland you’ll remember that just about every shop with a focus on tourism has shortbread on its shelves. Shortbread is often given as a Christmas gift but it is a definite feature of Scotland’s New Year festivities. A Scottish New Year (Hogmanay) custom is to eat shortbread on New Year’s Eve. […]

Continue reading about Traditional Scottish Shortbread

The Royal Museum of Scotland has finally reopened to the public after a £47 million (pounds Sterling) transformation.  It’s a moment thousands of people from the capital city of Edinburgh (pronounced Edinburra) and many visitors from around the world have been waiting for. The  light-filled Victorian building with its soaring Grand Gallery was cherished for […]

Continue reading about Revamped Royal Museum of Scotland opens to the public after three years

Staff at the ScotlandsPeople center said in a news update that they were excited to find an entry in the 1841 Census for South Uist (an island that lies off the west coast of Scotland) confirming that many people had emigrated from that Island to Cape Breton in Nova Scotia. It’s unusual to find comments […]

Continue reading about Another interesting find in the 1841 Scottish Census

Scotland’s Loch Ness monster was first written about in Adamnan’s Life of Columba, in which the missionary described how St. Columba persuaded a fierce sea creature to close its jaws and go in peace instead of devouring a  fellow monk. The first newspaper account of a sighting of the monster was not until 1933,when the […]

Continue reading about The Loch Ness monster first appeared in Adamnan’s Life of Columba

The British Royal Family has come a long way in the past two generations, especially Queen Elizabeth II (and 1st of Scotland) who was likely thrust into a new reality when she agreed to the divorce of Prince Charles and that of her children Prince Andrew and Princess Anne. Not to mention the behavioral patterns […]

Continue reading about Royal household saw Prince Philip as an outsider for going to ‘crank’ school

Deceased online says “A further 105,000 burial records for Aberdeen City have been added to the database. This is in addition to nearly 25,000 burial records for Scotland’s third largest city so this will increase the data size to almost 130,000. The new data is for St Peter’s Cemetery and Churchyard for the period 1830 […]

Continue reading about Deceased online has added 105,000 records for Aberdeen, Scotland

There’s going to be a six-month long party to commemoration the 150th anniversary of the laying the foundation stone of the Wallace Monument atop the Abbey Craig, which is actually located in the village of Causewayhead—part of historic Stirling, home to Scottish kings and queens. As the story goes, a committee was set up to […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s spectacular Wallace Monument to celebrate its 150th birthday

The establishment of Christianity in Scotland may have begun with St. Ninian around the end of the 4th century, but the strongest roots are in the island of Iona, off the west coast of Scotland, close to the Island of Mull. It’s just three miles long and one mile wide. Although insignificant in size, Iona […]

Continue reading about Iona Abbey one of the oldest and most important religious centers in Western Europe

Sandy on April 5th, 2011

The 1911 Scottish census is available as of today April 5, 2011. The images of the books are in full color and for the first time including particulars of marriage, the number of children born from the marriage, the occupation and nationality of the person listed on the census. People with special needs were enumerated as […]

Continue reading about 1911 Scottish Census is available today!

Sandy on April 4th, 2011

I might be a wee bit biased here because I’m Scottish born and spent my formative years in Scotland in an area steeped in history. When I lived in New York I actually met very few Scots, but now that I’ve moved south they’re everywhere. And, because I’m a family history enthusiast, I see Scottish […]

Continue reading about Why Scottish History Matters

Here’s a reminder from Scotland’s People on the release of the 1911 Scottish census: “The 1911 census will be available by 11:00 BST on Tuesday 5 April. Images of the enumeration books will be in full colour and for the first time the enumeration includes the particulars of the marriage, the number of children born […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s People to release the 1911 Census on Tuesday, April, 5.

Sandy on March 13th, 2011

Glenn Lyon is the longest glen in Scotland and is rich in history. The most famous tale of the area is actually an enormous hoax regarding the village of Fortingall, which lies at the entrance to this beautiful highland glen, suggesting that the village was the birth place of Pontius Pilate. In modern times Pilate […]

Continue reading about Pontius Pilate’s Scottish roots: Fact or fiction?

I’ve written about the merger of the National Archives of Scotland and the General Register Office for Scotland. This is to remind you that as of April 1, the merger will be completed: “From  1 April 2011 the name of the merged NAS-GROS organisation will be the National Records of Scotland (NRS) The strapline  for the new […]

Continue reading about A new name for the merged National Archives of Scotland and General Register Office for Scotland

The following information was posted on the findmypast.co.uk blog today January 20, 2011. It’s a reminder of what was added in 2010 and what’s planned for 2011: “ What’s planned for 2011 on findmypast.co.uk?

Continue reading about Findmypast.co.uk to expand their collection to include Scottish Censuses 1841-1901

I wanted to write about the Fortingall Yew, not only because some of my ancestors at one time lived and worked the area, but also because people have asked about it. It’s one of eight pictures that rotate on my blog and each time you visit SpittalStreet.com, or click on another page in the blog, […]

Continue reading about Scotland’s Fortingall Yew is 2000–5000 years old is the oldest tree in Europe

Elizabeth Roads of Edinburgh (pronounced Edinburra) is the first woman ever, after a 35-year career at the heraldry office forScotland, to be appointed herald at the Court of  the  Lord Lyon. The English equivalent, the College of Arms, has never had a female herald. The individual we call a “herald” today is not the trumpet-blowing […]

Continue reading about First female to be appointed a herald by Scottish centuries old institution